38

That's similar to my old commute (a bit further but flatter), and I didn't cycle regularly when I started. The Google estimate is probably reasonable for the second time you do it, though may not reflect rush hour traffic. The first time will probably take longer due to unfamiliarity (a trip when it doesn't matter if you're late is helpful) and eventually ...


13

Yes, you can ride that distance daily. You might find it hard at first but it should definitely be doable. I can't say if the Google estimate is any good - it will depend on how fast you ride and delays at intersections and road crossings. Try riding the route on a weekend to get an idea of how hard you find it and how long it takes. Then try at regular ...


10

There are a bunch of bikes sold in the UK that are specifically designed for the cycle-to-work scheme: they have good specs for commuting, are priced to come in under the £1000 limit, etc. A number of online vendors stock these. So that would be a good place to start. Or find someone selling one of those bikes used. The additional weight of a steel bike is ...


9

I am wondering if it's possible to commute daily by bike. Easily. I used to do almost 60 km round-trip daily. Well, it'll be easy after a while. If you're not used to riding every day, it'll be pretty difficult at first. Google predicts it takes 52 minutes (one-way). Do you think it's an accurate prediction? That depends on you. 17 km in 52 minutes ...


9

Medefietser hier. I live in the Netherlands, too, and I work 13 km from home. It's doable, and it will get better with practice. When I started using the bike instead of the car I needed about 1 hour for the single trip, now I can pull it out in 35 minutes. Google prediction is more on the well-used-to-it side. Few advices: the first weeks will be ...


9

Given your budget you'll be looking at aluminum or steel framed bikes, but that's fine. There are many choices of steel or aluminum drop-bar bikes available. The first thing I would think about is how much gear do you need to carry when commuting? Can you carry everything you need in a backpack or will you need panniers or other on-bike luggage? mass is ...


5

Yes this is achieveable. To expand on other's points: Mix up your route, if possible. Riding the same roads over and over gets a bit old. Add 5 minutes and go a little out of your way for some variation. You might even discover a better route. The good days are great. The bad days, less so. If you have no alternative to get home, then imagine riding ...


5

One point which hasn't been mentioned here is maintenance. A bike used for a non-trivial daily commute, especially through the winter, sometimes in wet conditions, will need a significant amount of care, both in terms of money and time. The chain and sprockets/chain rings as well as the brake pads (for rim brakes; I have no experience with disk brakes) ...


5

A steel tourer will make a great commuting bike. You will want mudguards, a pannier or two and puncture-resistant tyres. It will be a bit slower than your road bike but this won't add up to more than about 5 minutes over 13 miles especially in London. Steel is usually a little bit heavier than aluminium at a given price point but has a better ride.


4

Assuming you have an alternative mode of transportation between home and work that is acceptable to you, and that you can safely leave your bike at or near work, you could also 'split the difference': I had a colleague aged over 50 who on average cycled to or from work every day, on a route that was around 40km one way over a 600m mountain (600m gain and ...


4

Yes If the roads are bike-friendly, then it sounds like what you are trying to achieve is definitely possible. If you don't want to have a hard time of it and have to shower at either end, you could even just get an ebike that would do most of the work for you. It isn't cheating if you aren't racing; you are just trying to get to work.


4

TL;DNR - All else equal, an aluminum framed bike at the same price as a carbon bike will be a better bike. My general feeling for Carbon frames are they are overrated, or more accurately, quality modern aluminum frames is underrated. Aluminum frames cost alot less to build than the cheapest carbon, let alone a quality carbon frame. With Hydro forming, the ...


3

Welcome aboard! I am probably not the typical member of the cycling community, at least not in UK; however, I have cycled both in UK and in Denmark, where I grew up, for some 50 years, so I have some experience. I have tried many different types over the years, and it may surprise you to hear what I have settled on, for the last 25+ years: a heavy, sit-up-...


3

Good type of bike to get for commuting. Product recommendations are off-topic for Bicycles Stack Exchange, but we can offer principles to use when shopping. You have a clear purpose in mind for your bike and you have some ideas for the a type of bike to meet your need. What you have in mind is an excellent place to start, and it may be the place that you ...


3

I would say 17 kilometers is around the limit. In Denmark around Copenhagen where it might be slightly more hillier than the flatter parts of The Netherlands, it is not uncommon for people cycling 17 kilometers to and from work each day. However, for such distances, the cyclist will usually have a good fast bike (light racing bike, not an ordinary city bike),...


3

Very much so - I've done a 30 km each way commute over terrain that was half hills, half flat, for two seasons. It can be practical or not, depending on what you're comparing it to (underground is always quick, public transport I usually out-ride). Either way it was only 5-10 minutes more than a car in city traffic, and often I found myself repeatedly ...


2

Absolutely, yes! I'm riding 25km each way (in Melbourne AUS). Normally takes me less than 1 hour each way - I average speeds of 25km/h most days with strong headwinds. You might want to confirm you will have end of trip facilities (showers) at your disposal when you get to your destination. At around 10km you might start to break a little sweat even if you'...


2

I'll try to answer as best I can as I've just upgraded using the cycle to work scheme Firstly the £1000 limit has been lifted so as long as your employer has signed up to an official cycle to work scheme then the sky's the limit, or as much as you can afford to pay back monthly. Secondly bare in mind the shop owns your bike for the first 4 years, you are ...


2

I commute 15 km one way, relatively flat with a steep way up (and down when coming back) for maybe 300 m in the middle of these 15 km (which I walk pushing my bike). I would love to say that I commute everyday but it is not true, this is more 4 times a week, then a week or two without commute, or only one, then again a surge of strong will for a week or two,...


2

As others have stated, it's certainly possible. I used to do it for a couple of months. I found that: I needed more sleep/rest than before¹ I needed more food than before If I would have a 15–30 km commute for longer, I would consider to get a recumbent. I don't have personal experience with one, but it's supposed to be quite a bit easier. My main ...


2

An old MTB will have used 26" wheels (559mm rims), you want to put 700c (662mm) rims on it with smaller tires. We can work out wheel approximate diameters. Assuming tire height above the rim is about the same as its nominal width and the MTB frame will take a 50mm tire. 559/2 + 50 = 329mm 622/2 + 28 = 339mm (+10mm) The 700c tire might fit but bear in ...


1

@GregoryLeo another side-thought is gearing changes. Some assumptions - the bike is a 48/38/28 triple, with an 11-32 cassette (number of gears is irrelevant here) and I've assumed a 559-54 tyre, so ~54mm wide. 48 38 28 tooth chainring 11 113.2 89.6 66.0 12 103.8 82.1 60.5 14 88.9 70.4 51.9 16 77.8 61.6 45.4 18 69.2 ...


1

I can't speak to the durability or reliability of carbon fiber frames for commuting, but it seems to me that a bike frame should easily withstand the weight of a lock on the down tube as you describe. A water bottle in the cage being jerked around by the bumps on the road would probably generate more stress. And if the frame is that delicate, do you really ...


1

Since no-one else brought it up i will, have you considered an electric bike? 20 km is a large distance, you could make it easier for yourself. I commute about 15 km using a electric bike. I think it saves me a little time because my speed remains 20-24 km/h even if i'm tired. And it is just easier. Both these factors make that i always look forward to my ...


1

Nobody mentioned belt here, so I'm going to. A belt drive is a fantastic thing for commuting. The belt won't be putting grease on your leg, or if you're really unlucky, on your work clothes. It is supposedly less efficient than a clean chain/derailleur system but when commuting, especially when you can expect a little water and grit to accumulate, it stays ...


1

General thoughts: Personally I have to say that while 20 km mostly flat commute sound OK to me, I'm not so sure that I'd like 20 km big city commuting by bike: the first step IMHO should be to find a good route for that commute (if you haven't already). Living in a rural area, I find city biking sucks because it's so slow and tedious due to traffic lights/...


1

Some thoughts outside the box, i.e. not exactly what you asked for, but which might be an option for you anyways: My stamina/endurance isn't at the greatest yet, so I plan to stick with my road bike to practice and build up stamina, […] My current milestone goal is to be able to start cycling to work, Although it might not be the right bicycle for you on ...


1

Yes, it can be done. I had a coworker who did a 40km (roundtrip) most days. He did however drive when it snowed or otherwise was really bad weather. We did also have a dressing room with showers at work so he was able to change clothes.


1

Fenders/Mudguards are more important on a commuter bike than any other style of bike. That's because it helps keep you clean for wherever you're commuting to. So the features you're looking for in a mudguard / fender are Length - a rear mudguard should stop water and muck flinging off the back tyre from hitting you or your bags. To do that, the rear ...


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