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3

I am a 39 year old who also commutes via a fixed gear bicycle. It will take time to get used to riding like that. I was in to cycling for years before I bought my first fixed gear. I hated it for the first 3 weeks, because the feeling is much different and it can be a lot of extra work. If you want to stick with this, I’d suggest waiting until spring when ...


4

As a serious multi decade rider with two bike clubs I will say that it is both. It is partly you because you are out of shape but that will fix itself if you ride regularly. It is more the bike. You got the WRONG bike for what you want to do. Even a clunky bike with 3 speeds would have been better than that single gear racing bike you bought. Far better ...


6

I will just add that when I was your age I resumed commuting by bike after a hiatus of a couple of years. I was riding from Astoria, Queens, New York, to downtown Manhattan, a distance of just over 9 miles each way by my most frequent route over the Williamsburg bridge. I had moved to New York a couple of years before from Amsterdam, so I was no longer ...


10

Both. You really, really, really don't want a bike without gears. In the city you'll rarely ride at the optimal speed for that transmission; instead you need to stop and start frequently and adapt to flow with the traffic which is much easier if you can switch gears. Try to sell yours as long as you can advertise it as "practically unused" and buy ...


10

Despite their already being multiple good answers I am going to post this because I think each answer has good points but it is useful to have them in one place. I agree with everyone who said a single speed bike is a significant source of your problems. Even a three speed internal hub would have been much better for you. As your fitness improves you will ...


13

4.1 miles, mostly flat, are on paper doable by any human with two legs in about 90 minutes. Walking. A bicycle? it should be at least 1/3 quicker (although I would expect it to be 3 or 4 times faster than walking). Even a super-heavy dutch bike will allow you to cruise at 8-10 miles per hour, so the distance should take you about half an hour. So it is the ...


19

Great effort on both the write-up and the commitment to start riding again. Try and separate the issues: Your route was suboptimal due to trusting google Getting off and walking a bike is surprisingly tiring your speed is quite fast for someone who is just coming back to riding after a multi-decade long break You were under time pressure to avoid being late,...


63

Was going to comment, but I'll make this an answer - it's the bike, not you. No, I really do mean it's the bike..... The bike as a fixie with 48/19 gearing is suitable for a cycle fit 20-something year old hipster with great knees now and a good health insurance plan for future orthopedic consultations. Installing the freewheel helps make it more versatile, ...


3

Jay a couple things to think about: It is good you are getting back into riding. I was in a similar position where I got back in to riding after taking a break and thought how hard can 13 miles be. Well the short of it was harder than I expected. So with that said you probably are using muscles you have not in a while and it will take some time to build up ...


5

This size frame seems pretty small for your height. I would think a small or medium (50/54 cm, according to Cinelli) would be the right size for you. But that wouldn't account for the problems you experienced. It does mean that getting into an efficient, comfortable position will be harder. When you find it hard to turn the pedals over, is that because you'...


11

This is an updated form of my answer, partially in response to the other answers. It is you, not the bike. The bike may be a bit of a tough, perhaps over-ambitious choice, but it is in principle ok for the task. Many of the other answers argued that a singlespeed drop-bar bike is fundamentally not suited for a city commute. I disagree. Such a bike can be ...


2

Yes, it's your DNA Case in point, a housemate of mine cycled everywhere - he had a good bike and we lived in a hilly area. His friend who was not a regular cyclist came to visit and borrowed an average bike. They decide to go on a tour of the area. I happened to watch as they set off. By the end of the street, the visitor was way ahead without even appearing ...


13

Daniel, what is your actual question? Us strangers on the internet cannot tell you if you are genetically gifted, you must test your biology yourself. I guess the best you can expect from this community is to suggest such tests to you: VO2 max red blood cell count levels of hepatic gluconeogenesis hematocrit level Community members, please add to and edit ...


2

It might be, but it's not end all be all. Why do I think so? I'm in a bit similar situation, in that I can hang on to group rides that average around 35 km/h and ride up hors categorie rated climbs with standard 39-53 crankset. It's not training in my childhood, because I was a bookish kid, dropped out of PE class as soon as I could and got the equivalent of ...


2

It's almost all down to training. Many people don't ride regularly, even when they own a top bike and racing gear, while other ride to work daily. An untrained rider probably does averages between 15km/h and 20km/h, daily commuters average at least 20km/h in the city, more when there are no traffic lights to stop at. As such, it's common for daily commuters ...


10

Get a power meter or borrow a bike with one. Bicycling is all about power in relation to your body weight and aerodynamics. Measuring your watts per kg will answer your question. Don’t just measure your maximum power (sprint) but measure at least a 20 minute effort. There are a lot of reasons why seemingly fit riders might ride slow: Easy training ride, ...


16

If you really want to find out, look for a local time trial route and see what people can do on that. There's also an advantage coming up behind someone - not so much the aero advantage as you have to get close for that, but the knowledge that there's someone to catch up with - your head goes into race mode, even just a little, but theirs doesn't. Some ...


5

Daniel I can understand what you are trying to say. I have an entry level road bike (2019 Trek Domane SL5, No aero wheels/bars), usually ride in basketball shorts, and a cheap T-shirt while being able to hit 25 MPH or more. Here is me with my basketball shorts on a normal ride not trying to do anything different for the camera (Full disclosure I have the ...


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