New answers tagged

1

The compatibility info at si.shimano.com is a great resource for Shimano compatibility questions. You can also find the specification handbook (including current models on the web version and pdf archives of the handbook going back to 2004), as well as service documents by model (dealer manuals, exploded views, etc) The parameters that need to be compatible ...


3

The front wheel (of wheel set you linked to) has a 12x100 mm front axle (road thru-axle) but comes with an adaptor for 9x100 quick release axle, and the fork is made for 9x100 quick release axles. Did you install the adaptor kit correctly on the front wheel hub? If you grab the front wheel by the tire close to the top of the fork and push/pull the wheel from ...


2

It may be best just to leave the bike as is, and simply knock a hundred bucks or two off the groupset for wear when you sell it. Better than A: having to buy a bunch of other parts which will also have to be sold, B: potentially riding a janky setup for months which isn’t guaranteed to shift well nor be very reliable with all the cobbled-together parts, C: ...


2

There is no hydro STI that can do the first idea. It would need to be an old cable pull 10 but hydro, and that doesn't exist. The first obstacle with your FC-M970 in BB86 idea is even if you jank it together with spacers, the bearing contact areas of the spindle won't be in the right place. Also you'll be taking a component where one of the reasons it's so ...


-3

You noticed that quick releases are unable to hold the wheel still when braking on the front brake. Quick release forks with disc brakes should not be manufactured at all since they are a general danger. Unfortunately, such monsters are available for sale. The problem is that the disc brake directs its braking force to cause ejection of the front wheel left ...


0

Your chainring has to match the bcd/bolt-pattern or it just won't fit. No, it doesn't have to match your chain speed. I run an 11s Shimano crankset on a 10s chain but then I couldn't run a 9s crankset on a 10s chain. But I don't think you could swap a different speed chain ring onto your cranks because I don't think it would fit. Yes, you can change tooth ...


2

Will the "speed" of a single chainring make much difference? Chains typically have approximately the same internal width (with very small differences so not exactly the same). The external width of a chain however varies. So higher speed chainrings for multi-chainring systems typically have the teeth slightly offset so that the chain can't "...


2

Yes, the rear derailleur cable pull ratio, unlike the front one, is still the same. You can use any (7-)8-9 speed RD.


2

I don't read French, but it is clear that the Mavic Aksium wheel you linked to has thru axle fittings: it stated that it took a 12x100mm front axle and a 12x142mm rear. The Surly Straggler fork you linked to is for quick releases only. I believe this line: Système d'axe : réglage rapide (9 x 100 mm) Was saying that the fork used quick releases. For sure, ...


3

It is indeed HT2. The website mentions “2 piece crank construction”, which refers to this. It should be compatible assuming the arm length is the same and the Q-factor is the same.


1

I briefly stated this in comments on Adam's answer, but do be careful of where you are measuring from and to. Seatpost lengths are usually measured from the bottom of the post to the center of the clamp. Redshift's website specifies that at its maximum insertion depth will leave 90mm from the top of the seat clamp to the center of the rails. It's not clear ...


1

As Daniel R Hicks says, it depends on the seatpost. There are some seatposts that offer "passive" suspension—they have no suspension mechanism, and rely on the flexibility engineered into the seatpost's materials (always carbon fiber, AFAICT). From what I've read, these don't do much good. The suspension effect with these will depend on the amount ...


4

All common 9 speed cassettes use the same freehub body. Also, trekking bikes normally use MTB parts, so there is no problem there. The Acera line is an MTB line. The manufacturers normally only distinguish (with some exceptions) road/MTB/urban and other bikes like hybrid, trekking, gravel, cyclocross take many components from those lines with only a few ...


0

Typically one can fit a front drive designed for one speed with the rear drive designed for another speed if the difference is +/- one speed. It's best to go with the chain that's correct for the rear drive, 9 speed chain in this case. However, i question the compatibility of a nine speed chain with the 12 speed crankset, though i cannot say what symptoms ...


6

The head tube of the bike has to be designed to specific dimensions to seat a specific type of headset cup. Hence, if your head tube isn’t designed for an internal headset, you can’t simply fit an internal headset to the frame. It is completely impractical to change the head tube. It may be possible in theory, but definitely not economical, because you’d ...


1

All "normal" mountain bike cassettes should fit a standard (8/9/10/11 speed) freehub. You only run into compatibility issues with 11 speed road cassettes (they are wider) and new microspline etc. interfaces. So yes, your cassette should fit


1

One point not mentioned is the rim internal width. This directly affects what widths of tyre can be mounted. That is, a 60mm wide tyre will mount better on a wider rim than a 25mm tyre. Additionally, tubeless rims are a thing. If you want to run tubeless tyres, then a tubeless-ready rim makes sense. If you're happy running clincher tyres with tubes, then ...


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