32

A mountain bike will never really be a road bike. The geometry and construction of the frame is different. Mountain bike frames are designed for a different posture and are often designed for a suspension fork, as well as generally being beefier. You can set up a mountain bike with slick tires and drop bars if you want. I've tried this before and the ride ...


15

The first thing to consider is tires.You'll want to mount the smoothest skinniest tires at the highest pressure that your wheels will accomodate.The knobbies add alot of rolling resistance. You'll know after the first ride if you need to make changes to the gearing.The most effective change would be to swap the the big chainring.The 42 tooth is pretty much ...


15

Yes a regular bicycle can be adapted as a draisine or a railbike as we call them (to use on abandoned railways with the tracks in place)? California, USA is big into this sort of thing. There are more books on the subject than websites to be sure of. Although there are so many styles of railbikes out there, it would be quite difficult to know what would ...


15

Converting between drop and flat bars is generally a huge amount of hassle. As you say, there are all kinds of incompatibility issues around brakes and shifters, and the geometry of the frame is designed with particular bars in mind, because changing the bars makes a big difference to riding position. There's no point spending £1400 on a bike and then ...


12

The debate of Presta or Schrader is mostly religious and often based on poorly misunderstood facts or historical differences. Rim Width. In the 21st century, the problem is less about the strength of the rim and more to do with fitting the tire beads and valve into a narrow rim. If the rim is wide enough to accept a Schrader and mount the tire, its strong ...


10

$50 - $100 isn't going to get you much in parts, especially any that would be an "upgrade" from your current setup. If you're riding your bike often, it's possible that you'll spend an amount approaching that this year on new tubes and/or tires when you get a flat or wear your tires out. My suggestion would be to ride this bike and enjoy it. You'll get your ...


9

On my Hard Rock Pro I've changed tyres to Marathon Plus, upgraded crankset to a lighter one with bigger outer ring, better chain and faster/lighter rear cassette, wider contoured grips, squeezed a full rear mudguard around my disc brake and fitted a front mudguard...I'm now told that I shouldn't be running 60-70psi because stock MTB wheels can't take it, so ...


9

Yeah, so long as you're more looking at simple recreation/commuting and not expecting to set any speed/distanced records, you can do a fair job of conversion. First get smoother, higher pressure tires, ideally a bit narrower than your current ones. You do not have to switch to 700C rims, though your choices with 26" rims will be somewhat limited. Next, ...


9

The desired conversion is possible, but maybe Trek won't do it as a "default" service. You could consider going to the local bike shop and trade some of the bike parts (specially the gearing system) for a coaster brake wheel. If your bike is like the one in the photo, you need to replace the rear hub, and get rid of the cogset, the derailer and the twist-...


9

Adapters like this do exist, e.g. http://www.danscomp.com/489051.php?cat=PARTS or http://www.bentechbikes.com/vbrakes.htm (Edit: Links are now dead, but they were basically the same as the one in the photo below. Sourcing one might be even harder now though.) In fact I used one on my old folding bike - but you can see it looks a bit of a mess, and when I ...


9

If you want to have a real cargo bike, e.g. an "inverse Bullit-style" the challenge will be structural integrity of your frame: you can't easily cut the 2nd diamond of your frame without risking to break the frame. However, I don't see a problem with removing your back saddle, cutting/removing the back cranks and building a sturdy plywood/mdf cargo hold ...


8

You may or may not be able to make that conversion with your existing brake/frame combination. Your brakes will have to reach farther because a 700c wheel is a smidge smaller than a 27 inch wheel. Depending on your setup, that may be possible. I'd recommend borrowing a 700c wheelset from someone to see if you can line it all up. If it all lines up, great. ...


7

Without being able to get a larger frame, your brothers suggestions are about the best you'll be able to do. Do you feel too compact on the bike (arms/hands feel close to your knees when pedaling)? pushing the seat back and longer stem will allow you to stretch out. You can purchase a longer seat post if needed, they even make offset seat posts that would ...


7

I performed such experiment sometime. This is what i did: Changed my wheelset for one made of light narrow rims and the smallest 26" tires I could get at the moment. Those where 1.9 or something similar and they where almost "slicks". The tires were inflated to their maximum labeled presure, 65 psi. I kept the brake system, it was v-brake. Just adjusted the ...


7

I don't see much point in "improving" the bike until you decide what improvements you need. About the only thing I can think of that you might want to change right off is the tires, if they're heavily lugged (which I can't tell from the description) and you prefer road to off-road riding. And, of course, you may find that a different seat would suit you ...


7

Yes, a battery holder and switch from radio shack would accomplish this. Most dynamos are 6vac and can be replaced with 4xAAs or the 5vdc from a USB pack. You can ignore the issue about polarity as the dyno lights that I've worked are either incandescent and don't care or are LED but have built in blocking diodes and don't care. Whether you would want to do ...


6

The first thing to note is "Does the 8 speed hub clear the dropouts ?" You may be able to spread the frame if steel. Since you're likely going from a 120mm to 130 mm (which is 2 sizes - 120->126->130), you should be cold setting it. The second question would be "Can the brakes reach the rim?" Unfortunately, to my knowledge, nobody makes a 5 speed ...


6

You need a bunch of things. left hand shifter, or a left hand replacement brifter if your bike has integrated shifters front derailleur mechanism with a band-on (aka bolt-on) clamp mechanism and diameter of the same size as your seat tube new inner gear cable and cable housing for the front mech a pair of cranks that have the same length, and same size ...


6

Depends what you mean by city bike and road bike. If you mean converting a bike with flat bars to one with drop bars there are issues. Flat bar bike frames are typically longer than drop bar frames, because flat bars place the rider's hands closer to the head-tube than drop bar hoods or drops hand positions do. Also, compatibility of brakes, levers/shifters ...


6

Tadpole-style trikes with one wheel in back are quite easy to electrify. You can either use a rear hub motor or a bottom bracket motor. Given the high startup torque requirements with rickshaws and thus the desirability of low gearing and a range of gears, I’d recommend a bottom bracket motor such as a Bafang BB - the only concern is if there’s enough ...


5

Can you turn you MTB into a good, road worthy machine? Short answer: Sure, why not? If you intend to do any road racing,forget about it, HOWEVER, if having a quick and sturdy bike for commuting, weekend terrorizing, or even the occasional century is what your after, then definitely go for it! I did! First and foremost, skinny tires are a must. There are ...


5

The first thing you should be looking into is gearing to ensure that an internally geared hub will work for you! The more you pay, the more gear range you get out of a hub, but even the nicest internally geared hubs don't match the spread of standard mountain bike gearing. If you've decided that an Alfine 11 hub is for you then to answer your questions in ...


5

No, it is not a good idea. You'd be spending more than the bike is worth even for a basic internal gear hub (even assuming you got the wheel rebuilt for free using the existing rim and spokes, if possible), let alone buying a rear wheel with an IGH built in. You do need a chain tensioning pulley or horizontal dropouts, which while can be built more robustly ...


5

You probably don't need to purchase a new crankset. You can remove the the rings you don't need and simply add a new ring. You'll need to know the distance of the bolt holes of your current chainrings/crank. This is known as the BCD (bolt circle diameter) and you can usually find it stamped on the chainring. Common sizes include 130mm, 110mm, 94mm, etc. ...


5

Yes. The best way to do it is to use a White Industries ENO Eccentric Hub (I don't care that I'm giving a product recommendation here because this is the only product that's ever done what it does), the alternative being using a magic ratio setup. The other part of it is getting set up with the proper chainline up front.


5

Without any additional knowledge on the bike, my advice would be don't drill into the down tube. You run the risk of making it structurally unsound. That being said, some bikes with downtube shifters have a hole drilled in the downtube with a rod going between the mounts and maybe some epoxy using something like this: Some other options are: Find a ...


5

You have to consider compatibility between the shifter/brake lever units and: Rear derailleur Front derailleur Brake caliper Rear derailleur should be fine, Shimano uses the same cable pull ratio for everything 9 speed an below. Front derailleur is probably OK, although I'm not familiar with Shimano's schemes for front derailleur cable pull ratio. Brakes ...


5

You have other options as well if you get on with the bike but not so well with the bars. I bought a new primary bike a couple of years ago - it was a steel tourer with similar specs to the Sutra, and I'd only spent a couple of hours total on drop bars before. I believe fit on a gravel/adventure road bike to be closer to a touring fit than a race fit - ...


5

Can I even put in a solid axle in this wheel/hub? Probably not. The axles of QR hubs are generally not designed to be removed and replaced with a through-axle. Some hubs are designed for both retention systems and can be converted. This does not look like one of them. I've never seen a rim brake hub with a through axle.


4

You will probably need to drop your brake calipers. I did this on my 1981 Raleigh. Despite fitting long-reach Tektro R559 calipers, the back wheel looked like this: There might have been another millimetre by fiddling, but not the difference I needed. Please ignore the dodgy-looking cracked tyre sidewalls... they where only for testing. Here's the drop-...


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