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Since 1982 or so just about all rear derailleurs are built with a slant parallelogram design so that it glides in a diagonal line as it shifts up and down. This is supposed to keep the jockey wheel a constant distance from your cogs, which are arranged from biggest to smallest. It is a very popular design because it just works really well and the patent ...


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I think the closest you'll get is to just have a cassette comprising the biggest three cogs (which are usually joined), and then the rest of the space for the cassette filled with spacers. The photos of this hill climbing bike demonstrate it: https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:mgm6Li4DdToJ:https://cyclingtips.com/2020/08/6-2-kg-three-gears-...


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Additionally, you'd have to have at least one different cog, probably an 11 or 12 tooth outermost, because it has a differnet design to every other cog. This little cog also has the detents for the lockring to engage into, and without them the lockring could back itself out letting all the cogs flop around somewhat. This would give sketchy riding at best. ...


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It would still be a 9-speed. Each of the 9 would be 9 instances of the same speed. You can get spacers for installing a single sprocket on your freehub. Also, rvil76 makes an important point about shifting.


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Yes, it can be done. You need a BMX freewheel, chain tensioner and a selection of bike tools that will probably cost more than the parts if you can't borrow them. It used to be a common modification for keeping old MTBs running back in the days when strong legs and mechanical ability were something to brag about. The singlespeed BMX freewheel goes on the ...


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I would say : no way. The rear derailleur is not supposed to handle cogs with the same dimension. The cogs should be smaller towards the outer part of the cassette, to correspond to the movement of the RD.


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No. Primarily because most cassettes are not actually fully made of separate cogs and the top few are usually a single piece.


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TLDR: Yes, you can convert your bike to a single-speed. But as you have a free-wheel on your bike it's more complicated and expensive than a free-hub conversion. Your bike currently has a free-wheel as opposed to a free-hub. This means that hub assembly is threaded and not slide on, so instead of a conversion kit as posted by @Criggie you'll need to buy a ...


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You can do anything you want - it is your bike. To test singlespeed (and help figure out what gear ratio you want) pick a gear choice, and do your normal rides without changing. Doesn't matter if you have a hill to climb or a stiff headwind, stay in the same gear. That's all you'll be able to do in the future. And its okay to just stay there if it suits ...


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Generally, derailleur bicycles are made with vertical dropouts. It means there's no way to adjust chain tension apart from eccentric bottom bracket (but such a solution would leave less space for bottom bracket bearings, and I'm not sure if the superior external Hollowtech II bottom brackets are available as eccentric), or a chain tensioner. Usually chain ...


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There have been various pressfit shell standards (Singer, Klein, Fisher, others) that are dimensioned similiar to an ISO shell and where convesion might be possible in some sense, but they all involve special shouldered BB spindles and the whole idea takes far more expensive and elaborate tooling than the BB taps you're in need of to begin with. There are ...


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It is impossible to convert a threaded BB shell to one of the common press fit standards, e.g. PF30, BB86. I assume you have an English (aka BSA) threaded BB with a 33.6-33.9mm diameter. All the press fit standards have larger diameters for the bearing seats. Many also require wider BB shells than the BSA (which is 68mm for road bikes). Even if you could ...


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The cheapest update you can do is a bigger chainring. You have the BBSHD chainring (how many teeth? it exists up to 52 teeth), but there are alternatives: third-party compatible parts (google for "ChainRing for the BBSHD") adapters to regular BCD chainrings (I found some of them via googling "BBSHD to BCD adapter"), then you may find ...


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So you have a 7 speed bike, with presumably a cassette of 11 though 28 teeth, and a single chainring of 40/42/44 teeth. Your rear wheel will be a 26" or 559 according to modern nomeclature, and your rear tyre is probably between 1.5 and 2 inches (37-52mm) The motor will propel you faster, until either The assistance limiter kicks in, The maximum speed ...


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