8

Thats just the adhesive from the old rim tape. Get a cloth and some rubbing alcohol and rub away, and it should look brand new.


7

I went ahead with the rotary tool (Dremel) and general cutting disc. I cut two grooves side by side in the top spacer and prized one of them open with a flat screwdriver. Once the aluminium is thin enough, it will snap open with a little click, so it isn't necessary to cut all the way through. I carefully cut a little deeper each pass and tested with the ...


6

Based on Swifty's suggestion, I will make this a formal answer. In summary, I would (carefully!) use a high-speed rotary cutter to deeply incise the spacers and pry them open. Note that it's probably simpler if you have a router attachment and a suitable bit for cutting metal; most of the rest of this still applies, but making the required cut is much ...


6

Presumably you're talking about a Profile or one of the other BMX hubs with ti hop-up bolts available. Yes, there is no issue. Were a bolt loose and able to rub dynamically against the frame, they could in theory chew it up because they'll probably be way harder. But if you're riding around with loose axle bolts you'll have other much more imminent problems.


5

Use fenders with good coverage! They will keep most of the dirty spray water off your bike. You'll be surprised how much less oiling your chain needs with proper fenders. Proper fenders means: a front fender with a mud flap that reaches within a few centimeters of the road a rear fender that starts some centimeters below the chain stays, so that water ...


4

Eventually got an aluminium seat-post out of an old steel Peugeot road-bike frame. It had been in for a couple of decades, never moved and was completely 'welded' in place. Tried penetrating oil, freezing spray, rotating in a vice, twisting with big mole-grips, etc - nothing worked. Eventually, cut the seat-post about an inch above the frame and tried the ...


4

Aluminum alloy 2014 is often used in the aircraft industry for structural support beams and the auto industry for truck frames. See metallurgy reference. It outta be just fine for a chainring. Alloy 2014 T6 has a Tensile strength (ability to resist stretching forces) of about 483 MPa which is comparable to structural steel and much higher than 6061 T6 ...


3

It’s not bad, it’s cosmetic only. It’s just surface corrosion that’s got under the clear coat. Do you live in area where salt is used on the roads? Perhaps the previous owner was not good about cleaning under the bottom bracket shell. You can halt this by making sure to thoroughly clean the bike regularly and use something like WD40 in vulnerable area to ...


3

Why have my crank arms started corroding? In the content of the post concern about corrosion between the pedal and crank is discussed. Summary: The crank arm has been abraded allowing the aluminum to corrode (oxidize). The pedal and crank connection is corroding due to exposure to water or a water/salt combination. The issue in the orange circle is ...


3

There is no real corrosion resistance difference among the three . 7 year atmospheric exposure ( Kure Beach NC) shows slightly less weight loss for 6061; BUT , because it is difficult to measure corrosion in Al because of pitting, the tensile strength loss ( of thin material) is measured. 2014 and 7075 lost zero % while 6061 lost 0.007 %. So no practical ...


3

Looks like filiform corrosion to me, which is a typical form of corrosion found on lacquered aluminium (and other metals). In my opinion, the scratches are too organic looking to be just scrachtes (with a layer of oxide forming in the scratch of the lacquer). It is indeed a superficial form of corrosion. This type of corrosion starts at a scratch or other ...


3

Store your bike in a dry place if possible. This is probably the most important thing - even if you ride every day, your bike spends more time parked than it does on the road. Clean and oil the chain regularly. If it's squeaking or showing rust, you're not doing it often enough. If you have loose bearings anywhere on your bike (hubs, pedals, bottom bracket, ...


3

The caustic soda works well, but if you cut off the seatpost and put a cork in it,you can pour the solution in from the BB shell and it's less messy


3

What worker for me was acetylene blow torch and heating the seat tube not the seat post. It will damage the paint and you really need to be careful to not overheat it. Go slow and steady move it little by little. lol. If you try with force most likely you will end with damaged frame. Just never use force if it's badly stuck. I have seen a lot of frames that ...


3

Your seat post is dead- don't bother trying to save it. I got one out by crushing the end of the seat post in a vice with the bike upside-down. Then asking two people to twist the bike frame around while I hauled on a block and tackle to raise the bike up off the seat post. The saddle was already removed and the tackle was fastened back and forth around ...


2

Return to the past. When an aluminum seat post has locked into the steel frame it can be removed with a hack saw and a another hack saw blade mounted in an end of blade handle. Use the regular hack saw, the blade is held at both ends, to cut off the seat post about a 1/2 of an inch above the frame. With a standard hack saw blade and end of blade handle ...


2

you can try to use caustic soda. It will melt down the aluminum. But you have to be very careful. Watch this video


2

The best way is not to ride your bike on rainy days at all. According to your own account, this isn't possible. So: Wipe dry the frame, bottom bracket, hubs, chain, crankset, etc. If possible, use an air blower to keep them dry. Use water-proof parts, like some hubs with a rubber ring to prevent water from getting inside them. Also using waterproof grease ...


2

I can answer this question myself, having removed the screws, measured them, ordered replacements, got the wrong size, and so on. So other people can learn the easy way! The screws (or bolts?) are M4x6 button-head. The threaded portion is actually slightly longer than the nominal 6mm on my set, closer to 7mm. But if you buy M4x8 screws you will find that ...


2

I have exactly the same 'stains' on my 2003 Centaur Ergopower levers, which I also attributed to the layer of anodization wearing off. It is not corrosion. Different thermal expansion rates of the oxide and the alloy underneath could damage the layer of anodization. Not sure if the presence of mildy acidic human sweat could accelerate the process ...


2

I don't think you can. It looks to me like the anodized surface layer has worn off, exposing the plain aluminum.


2

I worked on an aluminum seat post in a steel frame for several weeks. With all hope gone, I took it to my local repair man who had it off in less than ten minutes BUT he will not tell me how he did it, and he did not use any heat or chemicals that I know of.


2

In many other cases I'd apply heat (to the spoke) but I'd be wary of doing that here, because you could end up tempering part of the spoke, while it's still under stress. If you're unlucky that would lead to weakening. Also you don't want to get that much heat too near the carbon rims. If you can get a few spokes right off, you may be able to slacken the ...


2

Try penetrating oil or silicone spray (I might try silicone spray first before penetrating oil) spray. Spray liberally and let it soak in for 30-60 min. Get a pair of channel locks - https://amzn.to/2WOt1CA Grab the spacer tight (perhaps put a thin shop rag between it and the spacer to minimize gouging and use brake clean to remove lube from the outer part ...


1

Edit: I've incorrectly supposed the way the galvanic corrosion between chrome moly steel and an aluminum alloy happens. I incorrectly thought both metals would be corroded, however, in galvanic corrosion it is the only one of the metals that is corroded because it acts as the sacrificial anode part of the circuit. In fact, the other metal is imbued with ...


1

Once you clean the surface completely, rubbing alcohol, goo gone, or your favorite cleanser.. look at the surface. Smooth = adhesive or some other junk, nothing to worry about (most likely the case). Pitted, degraded, or another type of surface damage would mean corroded. Enjoy the new rims!!! =D


1

The last stuck seatpost I removed was also the worse I'd ever had. I kept the frame inverted and filled the seat tube from the bottom bracket with Kroil, to a level above the post. I checked it at intervals and ended up soaking it for a few months. I clamped the seatpost in a very large vice that is bolted to a heavy workbench and eventually hard twisting ...


1

I have seen this exact thing before on the surface of aluminium car mag wheels that were stored , covered up in a damp environment for up to 2 years.' It definitely seemed to be due to a reaction with water and salt. The surface had been damaged at depth and was not restorable- it seemed, without remachining the finish again by taking a small layer. It ...


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