7

I went ahead with the rotary tool (Dremel) and general cutting disc. I cut two grooves side by side in the top spacer and prized one of them open with a flat screwdriver. Once the aluminium is thin enough, it will snap open with a little click, so it isn't necessary to cut all the way through. I carefully cut a little deeper each pass and tested with the ...


6

Based on Swifty's suggestion, I will make this a formal answer. In summary, I would (carefully!) use a high-speed rotary cutter to deeply incise the spacers and pry them open. Note that it's probably simpler if you have a router attachment and a suitable bit for cutting metal; most of the rest of this still applies, but making the required cut is much ...


3

It’s not bad, it’s cosmetic only. It’s just surface corrosion that’s got under the clear coat. Do you live in area where salt is used on the roads? Perhaps the previous owner was not good about cleaning under the bottom bracket shell. You can halt this by making sure to thoroughly clean the bike regularly and use something like WD40 in vulnerable area to ...


3

Why have my crank arms started corroding? In the content of the post concern about corrosion between the pedal and crank is discussed. Summary: The crank arm has been abraded allowing the aluminum to corrode (oxidize). The pedal and crank connection is corroding due to exposure to water or a water/salt combination. The issue in the orange circle is ...


2

Try penetrating oil or silicone spray (I might try silicone spray first before penetrating oil) spray. Spray liberally and let it soak in for 30-60 min. Get a pair of channel locks - https://amzn.to/2WOt1CA Grab the spacer tight (perhaps put a thin shop rag between it and the spacer to minimize gouging and use brake clean to remove lube from the outer part ...


2

Removing a stuck seat post takes finesse, it is like dealing with a broken off stud. you need to go slow and be careful or you will make it worse. Mechanical removal (I have done this successfully): you will need some hacksaw blades, a flashlight and optionally a large drill or possibly a unibit with an extention. 1)cut seat post off about 1" above ...


1

Edit: I've incorrectly supposed the way the galvanic corrosion between chrome moly steel and an aluminum alloy happens. I incorrectly thought both metals would be corroded, however, in galvanic corrosion it is the only one of the metals that is corroded because it acts as the sacrificial anode part of the circuit. In fact, the other metal is imbued with ...


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