10

You are undertightening the crank bolts on initial installation. 44Nm or 33 ft-lb work well as generic values for square taper cranks. A basic large beam-type torque wrench works well for crank bolts. If you aren't able to get one, it's safe for basic square taper cranks to reef like mad with something like a 12" ratchet or breaker bar. You'll be ...


4

No, cranks are not generally always interchangeable, but you probably can transplant the crank from the broken bike. First, do both bikes have 6, 7 or 8 sprockets in the rear cluster? If so, they use the same chain width and the spacing between the chainrings will be the same. Same deal if they both have 9 sprockets. (As you mention the chainrings are ...


4

You probably foremost need a neww chain and you will also need a new cassette. What you are linking are chainsets. You can normally just buy new chainrings for your existing crankset. As others mention in the comments, check first, whether the aluminium thing we see in the photograph in the top-right corner is a bolt that can be released with a hex key or ...


4

I would say that changing the crankset by 2 teeth is not worth the money it costs. At least try to only change the chainrings first. Cassettes are much cheaper so it is more natural to start there. However, your current derailleur has the minimum size of the largest cog 40, exactly as you proposed. It won't do much. So thinkink about also increasing the ...


4

If your bike came with those ring sizes, it probably has one of the trekking type front derailleurs. Find its model number on the back side of the cage and look up its specs to corroborate. Using this type of FD with a 40, 42, 44 etc will create excess gap with the cage that may result in chain drop and/or mediocre shifting. To avoid this, switch to a non-...


4

To start with, forget the math of the gear calculators. You can use those later.... If you are spinning out - is you cadence at 90-100 when spun out? If not, leave the chain rings and work on spinning technique. Changing the chain rings will help only for the times you are spinning out. If you spinning out for a only a short percentage of the time, it may ...


3

It is likely you're under-tightening the crank arm bolt. There's a bodge way to estimate torque when securing a fastener. 45 Nm is very roughly the torque applied by ~4.5 kilograms at a lever length of 1 metre. So 13.5 kilograms at the end of a 300 mm ratchet, 18 kg on 250mm, or 22.5 kg on a 200 mm lever. Measure your lever, and find a suitable weight in ...


3

Changing the chainrings simply changes how fast or slow you can pedal. A 5.5% larger chainring (e.g. changing from 36 to 38 teeth) allows you to keep pedalling at a 5.5% higher speed. Of course this assumes that you are limited by how fast you can spin the pedals (and not by your fitness or road/trail conditions). Going for a cassette with a narrower gear ...


2

Without more info about the specifics of your crank set it's hard to answer exactly what size you need, but yes, they can be replaced. You will want to know the bolt pattern and bolt circle diameter. What brand is the crank set? Shimano? Maybe add a picture. Depending on the condition of the chain and cassette, it may be wise to consider replacing those too.


2

Possible? Yes. Worthwhile? Probably. You would need to buy a new rear derailleur, the cassette and the crankset (you may reuse the cranks with a new front cog, the tricky part is to get a good chain line, similar to the one you have now with the middle front cog) and of course a new chain. Rear Hub is fine, it can accomodate a relatively cheap Sunrace 11-...


2

Likely yes, but it depends on the details. Since your chainrings are not removable, you likely have a lower-end mountain triple crankset; having 48 teeth on the largest ring is consistent with this. 1) The main consideration is what type of crankset you have. You most likely have a "3-piece". That has two removable crankarms (drive (chainring) side and non-...


2

As long as they both use the same interface (likely square taper in your case) and are from the same bike type (road vs MTB; MTB cranks are usually spaced wider), it should work. It will not be unsafe to use. Worst comes to worst, you try it and see if the shifting functions properly or not.


2

Besides the horizontal spacing between rings (determined by the number of gears the crank is designed to work with on the rear wheel), you also need to compare the bottom bracket compatibility. First, the type (square taper, octalink, hollowtech, etc), then the dimensions (especially for square taper, different cranks are designed for different length BB ...


2

The formulas are a bit rubbish sadly. Based on those, my crank length should be 200mm and that's simply not available. Feel free to disregard those as "average-sized person fairy tales" On the other hand, I do run 165mm cranks on my recumbent without issue. They're hard to find but do exist. You can also get a machinist or engineering shop to drill ...


2

160mm crank is abnormally short. This doesn't mean that you shouldn't but as Axemasta mentions, you should have a bike fit before deciding what crank arm length you should have. Plus you've not given any details about your bike or it's size. There are so many variables involved in knee pain, it would be foolish for anyone to suggest your first course of ...


2

Whoever wrote their product specs was probably confused, because "BB86.5" isn't really a thing. You have an FSA 386EVO crank. All the bikes in this series seem to have come with them. You probably have a BB386EVO shell. If not that, then it's probably a BB86 shell. This would require a fancy adapter bottom bracket to work with those cranks, which ...


1

The first thing I'd do is contact Tern and see if they can supply a replacement. That's the easier way to make sure you get a compatible crank. I don't think it's possible to buy Prowheel components directly (at least they didn't show up in a couple of online bike retailers I tried) so you need to find a compatible replacement. From the Tern Verge D9 web ...


1

It is inevitable than with more radial load, bearings will have lesser lifespan. The only alleviation to this is to get good quality bearings. If you notice a decrease in your bearings' lifespan, check if you've fitted your bottom bracket properly and specc'd everything to more or less proper torques indicated. If bearings fail regardless, there may be ...


1

They look to be compatible. The website says they'll work with any road DUB BB, which you have. Changing the spider shouldn't be too difficult as long as you follow the video. You can also find more info on the SRAM Service website. For example, here's the spider and chainring installation guide. Here's the DUB BB compatibility manual: DUBâ„¢ MTB and Road ...


1

If you have a 3x shifter the 2x derailleur might work, but very likely not as well as a proper 3x one. The cage is likely not deep enough to reach between the largest and smallest rings. You imply that the derailleur is installed on the bike, how did it get there? Is this a used bike you bought or did you have the derailleur replaced? If you have an Alivio ...


1

Yes, it will work, but not optimally. According to the bible: "Double" front derailers will work with triples, but if the middle ring is much smaller than the big ring, they will be balky shifting up from the small to the middle chainring. Several options: Drop the smallest chainring. You won't need it anyway. I have done this and I'm happy with the ...


1

SRAM Apex 1x crank supports 44, 43 and 40 tooth rings. To get to 32 teeth you'd need a mountain bike specific crank rather than a gravel groupset crank I think. Whichever crank you select should have appropriate chainline. Presumably you have a through axle, 142mm spacing rear hub. There are plenty of MTB cranks that provide proper chainline for that. Apex ...


1

I have a 38/48T crank setup and 11-30T cassette on my custom-built Surly Long Haul Trucker. Originally the 38/48T crank set was a triple (28/38/48T), but I removed the smallest chainring, not foreseeing any use for it, and adjusted the front derailleur to not drop the chain from the 38T chainring to the removed chainring. Most of the time, I use the 48T ...


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