7

I think that one rule of thumb I saw asserted that if you replaced promptly, you could get 2-3 cassettes per chain, and 2-3 sets of chainrings per cassette. I'm not able to provide a concrete source for this right now. However, the fact is that chainrings do wear more slowly than cassettes because they have more teeth. I think very likely that your cassette ...


6

The crankset (110 BCD) is unlikely to accept a 30T chainring. It definitely isn't supported by Shimano. You need a new crank. Look at subcompact cranksets like, e.g., FSA Tempo Adventure (10/11 speed). Note that this specific one also uses a different bottom bracket.


6

If the bolt in the photo is the same as the one that’s missing, it’s to preload the bearings before tightening the pinch bolts on a HT2-style crank. If that’s the case, I’m not sure what consequences, if any, are likely from riding with just the pinch bolts and no preload bolt. I would think it’s similar to riding without a headset cap in that once the pinch ...


5

When should I replace my.... Chain? When the chain checker says your chain is over 0.5% worn. Cassettes? When you start experiencing "skipping" in your most popular sprockets. Chain rings? When you see very obvious "shark teeth" on your chain ring teeth. Yes, it is true that there are more reasons why you should replace these components, ...


4

The new crankset is fine. The only difference between an "11-speed" crankset and a "9-speed" crankset is a slight difference in chainring width; you can use a narrower chainring with a wider chain. However, it is very worrying that you had a crankarm fall off—twice. That isn't normal for a correctly set up bike. If you bought this bike ...


4

I assume your current crankset has a 110mm BCD? You could go down to 46/33 teeth. (example 33 teeth chainring: https://www.bike-components.de/en/TA/X110-Chainring-4-arm-Inner-110-mm-BCD-p46803/) The Shimano RX600 crankset puts the rings and pedals slightly more outwards. It might work with a normal road front derailleur, otherwise (officially) you need a GRX ...


4

Without any photos it's hard for us to figure out what exact bolt you need. The bolt screws into the bottom bracket (which likely has a slightly tapered spindle, hence the need for the bolt fastened to the correct torque). Based on your Bikepedia link, it seems that your bike originally had an SRAM S150 crankset, which seems in the 2011 era to use a Truvativ ...


4

Good day, i just want to update everyone that I already used the 1x12 XT Crankset with my 9speed cassette/ 9 speed chain. i haven't had any problems with it or chain drop for 1 month of using now. thank you


4

Ok, so I got this sorted! Thanks to everyone for input. Posting the solution here in case someone else is facing the same problem. The answer is inspired by @Nathan Knutson 's post. @Nathan mentioned a transparent scuff washer... And I did not remember seeing one when taking the crankset off. So I took it all apart again and specifically looked for it. There ...


3

Your crank is secured by the two pinch bolts. The bolt on the side is a preload adjustment bolt. In a corner case scenario, if somehow the pinch bolts failed or were ridden loose or the spline interface cracked, it's possible to imagine the preload bolt keeping the cranks on such that you could bring the bike to a safe stop. So saying it's completely ...


3

The next thing to look at after the things you've tried is the BB shell. The shell face-to-face dimension being out of spec could cause this, as could any distortion from welding. The two problems are usually related since BB shells start out as machined parts; the idea that some are just made too long or short is possible but mostly unrealistic. Getting it ...


3

Power meters for square taper BBs are hard to come by, and usually custom made and expensive. However, fortunately the Surly LHT has an ordinary English threaded bottom bracket. Just swap out the UN-55 for any Hollowtech 2 compatible external BB, such as the Shimano Tiagra BB-RS500 or 105 SM-BBR60. Then, get any hollowtech 2 crank, replace the left side with ...


2

I just went through the same thing. In the end, after stripping the bolt with a standard p-handle hex wrench and a pipe for leverage (with another pipe over the opposing crank for counterforce), I was able to get the bolt off with a spiral bolt extractor and an Irwin Hanson adjustable tap socket. I used a 24' breaker bar on the socket side and a 36" ...


2

To check the bearings related to the crankset, specifically, the bottom bracket bearings, one can use a few techniques. As part of my regular drive train maintenance, I check the crankset for excess lateral play by holding a crank arm while the bike is held secure and pull and push the arm several times in the sideways, perpendicular to the length of the ...


2

Two main schools of thought exist. New rings every X cassette replacements, and new cassette every Y chain replacements. This required consistent records kept up to date correctly. Nowdays this is much easier with software like Strava, provided you set up the parts on your bike. This is the more-expensive method in the short term, because you are ...


1

Completely agree with what you are saying. To say I was upset and frustrated would be an understatement. But while the work from the shop has been shoddy, I always ask for compensation and they haven't objected, giving me the helmet and lock for free (~$170). They upgraded the crank for free and they will be swapping the whole bike out when they get a new ...


1

No! No! No! A thousand times no! A worn chainring engages to a new chain (and a worn chain too). A well-worn chain does not engage to a new chainring. So in fact the converse is true: you don't want to replace chainrings when replacing the chain, but you do want to replace the chain when replacing a chainring. I have a crankset with visible shark toothing in ...


1

While Jeff has already answered very detailed about the bottom bracket, I'd like to add that often the pedal bearings break long before the BB and can cause the noises you describe. Cheap pedals have cheap bearings and they also tend to get more abuse (dirt, water, hits...) and bad forces applied to them. So if you can try another set of pedals or at least ...


1

While product recommendations are off-topic here due to their tendency to become obsolete, it's fair to say that what you're up against here is that touring triples (24-36-46 or thereabouts) of the type that LHTs come with are pretty far opposite from the type of cranks that get left-crank power meters. But, what may exist is a 110/74 or 104/64 triple direct-...


1

Unfortunately the asymmetric four bolt pattern that Shimano switched to for these cranks is a new patttern and so far there are no small inner rings available. The best advice I can give is to switch to the older five bolt style crank, for which many small rings are available. I use 26-39-50 on the previous generation of Tiagra with no trouble.


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