7

I think that one rule of thumb I saw asserted that if you replaced promptly, you could get 2-3 cassettes per chain, and 2-3 sets of chainrings per cassette. I'm not able to provide a concrete source for this right now. However, the fact is that chainrings do wear more slowly than cassettes because they have more teeth. I think very likely that your cassette ...


6

The crankset (110 BCD) is unlikely to accept a 30T chainring. It definitely isn't supported by Shimano. You need a new crank. Look at subcompact cranksets like, e.g., FSA Tempo Adventure (10/11 speed). Note that this specific one also uses a different bottom bracket.


6

If the bolt in the photo is the same as the one that’s missing, it’s to preload the bearings before tightening the pinch bolts on a HT2-style crank. If that’s the case, I’m not sure what consequences, if any, are likely from riding with just the pinch bolts and no preload bolt. I would think it’s similar to riding without a headset cap in that once the pinch ...


5

When should I replace my.... Chain? When the chain checker says your chain is over 0.5% worn. Cassettes? When you start experiencing "skipping" in your most popular sprockets. Chain rings? When you see very obvious "shark teeth" on your chain ring teeth. Yes, it is true that there are more reasons why you should replace these components, ...


4

The new crankset is fine. The only difference between an "11-speed" crankset and a "9-speed" crankset is a slight difference in chainring width; you can use a narrower chainring with a wider chain. However, it is very worrying that you had a crankarm fall off—twice. That isn't normal for a correctly set up bike. If you bought this bike ...


4

I assume your current crankset has a 110mm BCD? You could go down to 46/33 teeth. (example 33 teeth chainring: https://www.bike-components.de/en/TA/X110-Chainring-4-arm-Inner-110-mm-BCD-p46803/) The Shimano RX600 crankset puts the rings and pedals slightly more outwards. It might work with a normal road front derailleur, otherwise (officially) you need a GRX ...


4

Without any photos it's hard for us to figure out what exact bolt you need. The bolt screws into the bottom bracket (which likely has a slightly tapered spindle, hence the need for the bolt fastened to the correct torque). Based on your Bikepedia link, it seems that your bike originally had an SRAM S150 crankset, which seems in the 2011 era to use a Truvativ ...


3

Your crank is secured by the two pinch bolts. The bolt on the side is a preload adjustment bolt. In a corner case scenario, if somehow the pinch bolts failed or were ridden loose or the spline interface cracked, it's possible to imagine the preload bolt keeping the cranks on such that you could bring the bike to a safe stop. So saying it's completely ...


2

Two main schools of thought exist. New rings every X cassette replacements, and new cassette every Y chain replacements. This required consistent records kept up to date correctly. Nowdays this is much easier with software like Strava, provided you set up the parts on your bike. This is the more-expensive method in the short term, because you are ...


1

Completely agree with what you are saying. To say I was upset and frustrated would be an understatement. But while the work from the shop has been shoddy, I always ask for compensation and they haven't objected, giving me the helmet and lock for free (~$170). They upgraded the crank for free and they will be swapping the whole bike out when they get a new ...


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