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2

The side that you say has been rubbed silver by friction is like that on a new ring (I've got two, bought from SJS cycles). From what I can tell from other posts it's intended to stop water and crud getting into the bearing. That would suggest that the non-silver side, the ridged side, should go next to the bearing because this is like an oil seal (although ...


0

Looks like it was ridden while the bolts were not tight enough. Possibly only hand tight. I've seen similar wear several times. Only takes a few miles of riding to incur the initial damage and then the left arm will not seat correctly again. Your bb is probably ok along with the crank spindle. I would look into replacing only the left side arm. Mark


4

The marks on the splines look about normal. It's hard to tell absolutely from the pics. You're looking for any sign of deformation or rounding, which occurs if the pinch bolts are loose while riding. Always make sure the pinch bolts are nice and tight, 14Nm or about as much as you would ever put through a long-handled 5mm L-wrench. You need to be able to ...


2

In Shimano cranks the plastic bolt is hand tightened prior to tightening the pinch bolts to 'preload' the bearings and take up play. When the plastic bolt is tightened the crank arms press on the inner bearing races only which is what takes up the play. If you remove the left crank arm and take away the preload you will feel a some play in the bearings. I'...


1

Retaining the 9 speed crank will likely cause front shifting issues. 11 speed chains are narrower so chainrings have to be slightly closer together on 11 speed cranksets. Shimano's documentation does not list any compatibility between 9 and 11 speed components. The general rule often quoted on this site is that you can get away with a 1 speed difference but ...


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In short, yes but not well. The distance between the chainrings in a Sora crankset is different than the Ultegra crankset. So if you have an Ultegra shifter and front mech, you may experience some issues (chain rub, delayed shifting etc). So it will work, but not as well as it should. An alternative is to get a 105 crankset, or other crankset of similar ...


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This is "older" advise that used to be gospel but these days has been engineered to be less of an issue. The chainrings and cassettes are constructed in opposite directions. That is the big chainring is on the outside, and the big cog in the rear cassette is on the inside nearest the midline of the bike. Upshot, when your chain is on "big-big" meaning the ...


1

I believe there can be an issue with play in GXP cranks. The play in the bearings is taken up by the non drive side crank arm sliding up along the splined taper as the bolt is done up and compressing the wave washer in the drive side. The bolt can be tightened up to the correct torque but there is still lateral play. Definitely check you have the spacers ...


3

To add to abdnChap's answer, I have encountered a crank arm that had an opening that was too small for my crank puller. This resulted in the puller pushing against the crank arm, rather than the axle.


4

There's a few factors that can lead to this problem and range from tool and crank material quality to user error. If you have a tool made from a weak metal or is manufactured badly (ie diameter is wrong), the threads on the tool can easily be ripped off. Similarly, if the cranks are made from a weak metal, then the threads on the arm can strip off. User ...


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