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2

This is actually an easy fix, but requires some special tools. On Shimano cranks, the left hand crank arm clamps the axle. When this is installed the crank and axle are pulled together by tightening the plastic cap that threads into the axle through the crank arm. This sets the bearing pre-load and removes any axial play. From the video it looks like you ...


2

The Canyon Endurace you linked to is a road bicycle, so it might not be able to handle something like a 46/30 as the front derailleur might not be able to be set low enough and the chainline is likely different. If you could get a bike shop to allow you to try the swap, though, it might be worth it because it might work. The bike will almost certainly be ...


2

Officially, you would need to use the corresponding GRX front derailleur. This is because the GRX crank uses a wider chainline, which is the distance from the center of the bottom bracket to the midpoint of the crankset's rings (hat tip to the late Sheldon Brown for the link). Shimano road double cranks use a 43.5mm chainline (for example, the R8000 ...


3

I can't speak to GRX specifically, but one of the Old Saws of cycling is "Buy the bike you want" which means to avoid buying a bike with the immediate intention of upgrading/replacing parts. Generally speaking, a new bike will work well together - by swapping things about, that new-bike feel may diminish. Unless your LBS is really nice and credits ...


5

gshenk's post is excellent general answer, here's the specific answer for the setup on the Digger Comp. The Digger comes with an RX-600 40t crank, RD-RX812 derailleur and CS-M7000 11-42 cassette. The RD-812 derailleur is compatible with wide-range mountain bike 11 speed cassettes (which have different spacing that 11 speed road cassettes). It's not designed ...


7

It depends. For most gravel bikes it will be an easy, yet expensive, swap. A couple of gravel bikes frames are built in a way that makes shipping a front derailleur as good as impossible. There may not be enough room for the chain stays to clear a second chain ring. What is more, some frames lack mounting positions and the shape or material of the seat tube ...


4

The numbers don't tally because you're measuring wrongly, I've marked up your photo with the circle (in yellow) you should be measuring, it's more like 147mm, or whatever irl without camera perspective distortion. That's much closer to the calculated value - 88 mm adjacent = 149mm calculated BCD. Measuring guide: Terminology index - a list of bike part names ...


5

It looks like you have a crankset with non-removable chainrings. The 'bolts' you are measuring the geometry of are just screws holding the chainguard on. The chainrings appear to be pressed steel and attached at the crank axle. It's much more likely the pressed steel rings are bent than the bottom bracket axle, so replacing the entire crank is possibly all ...


3

Before buying a replacement ring I would recommend removing the crank assembly. This requires a "square taper crank tool"along with a socket and ratchet most likely 14mm. Once off the bike edit your question to include photos of both sides of the assemble. Try to determine if the crank is bent by laying the crank on a flat surface (pedal side up) ...


-4

Just copped some FSA Vero’s! I Always buy name brand when it comes to bikes. FSA offers high dollar parts, very reputable brand! Unbranded always cuts corners!


2

Upgrading the same bike right now. Using the SRAM NX group with GX crank. Just took the old bottom bracket out today. If you do that you’ll need a ISIS/octalink splined tool. Take out the drive side first as it’s metal and less likely to strip. Clean the groves with a sharp object. Drive side came out easy. Non-drive side is plastic and easily strips ...


3

You’re right on. The road shifters have different pull ratio, so you need to use a road front DR. A Sora triple front DR will likely work.


0

You'll obviously want to select the appropriate chainring size and crank arm length. Cranks have a specific chainline (the nominal distance from the chain to the mid-line of the frame). The required chainline is affected by the spacing of the rear wheel dropouts, i.e. a 148mm spaced disc brake MTB frame has a wider chainline than a 130mm spaced rim brake ...


1

The parameters involved are as follows: Your frame’s bottom bracket shell, which is BSA threaded. The spindle type, which is where you ran into trouble. Shimano specifies a 24mm diameter spindle. SRAM’s GXP is a 24mm spindle that tapers to 22mm on the left crank. I don’t know if there’s a substantive reason for this, or if it’s just to avoid any patents ...


0

Claris - https://bike.shimano.com/en-US/product/component/claris-r2000/FC-R2000.html Ultegra - https://bike.shimano.com/en-US/product/component/ultegra-6800/FC-6800.html They have the same PCD and chain line which are the two measurements that show you whether the chainrings will sit correctly. I would be surprised if they weren't compatible based on this ...


8

You could replace the crank with any Shimano 2x9 crank for a square taper cartridge bottom bracket (with the same chainring sizes are crank arm length or course). If the bike is equipped with an Altus groupset then an Altus 2x9 crank would be a reasonable choice. There is a bit of an annoying wrinkle to this, different square taper crank models require ...


6

It might be possible to make a new thread using helicoil. It is a job for a good bike-shop but should be cheaper than a good pair of cranks.


2

Generally yes, its not a problem, if the cosmetics are not a problem :) You may find the Q Factor (how far apart the pedals are) changed and a pedals a little offset from center, but in reality this is unlikely to cause a big issue for most riders.


2

The left arm has no threads because that side is designed never to be separated from the spindle... From what I can find, that's an M18 thread, pitch unknown but probably M18x2.0mm or M18x1.5mm. Remove the right arm, put the spindle down through a sturdy surface with a hole no larger than 31mm so the metal part of the left arm has maximum support. Screw a ...


0

8, 9, 10 and 11 speed chains are progressively narrower to accommodate the necessary closer spacing of sprockets in the cassette. The distance between the inner plates is the same, but the width of the outer plates and rivets is different. The main difference between crank sets designed for 8, 9, 10 and 11 speed chains is the chainring spacing as you have ...


4

Percentile based formulas for crank length are trash. Femur length, health or special needs of all the joints in your leg, and the desired relationship between your saddle, knee, and pedal are all factors, as are the clearance needs of the bike, the type of riding being done, and Q. There is zero reason why a simple percent of your height would suffice. ...


1

Looks like you have an a lower end, inexpensive crank. The chain rings are riveted together, that's a construction method typically used on lower end cranks. Nothing is supposed to be removed or disassembled on such cranks. The rings moving on the splines will cause increased wear and eventually more movement. There's nothing you can really do to fix it so a ...


0

I'm going to throw this out there as even under close zoom, I can't tell for sure, but.... It's the crank arm that has busted leaving a chunk of itself still attached to the BB spindle (which is perhaps an Octalink or Isis interface. It appears to be round). Based on the photo showing misshapen, silver chunk I think that it is probably aluminum alloy which ...


5

Probably ISIS splined. That’s the only one with splines of that length with the smooth end. https://www.sheldonbrown.com/bbsize.html


2

I, too, had this problem this year when I purchased an O.E.M. CS-R7000 from a reputable eBay seller. OEM products are typically not sold with retail packaging and this was the case here. The cassette was wrapped in bubble wrap and newspaper, but the exterior package was a sort of beefed up manilla envelope and sent to me via US postal service. Upon it's ...


1

Mixing mountain (Tourney TX) and road (Sora R3000) components is tricky at best. But here the answer is easy because while the TX uses a square taper BB, the Sora crankset requires an outboard bottom bracket (cups threaded or pressed into the bikes BB shell with bearings that sit outside the shell). See Shimano's Compatibility Chart. These are completely ...


4

If you can identify the specific part number on the crank (or just by looking at pictures online), Shimano provides a great deal of information online about compatibility. For example, if you are using the current Tourney FC-TX801 crank, it uses a standard threaded square-taper bottom bracket, so any square taper crank will work. The SORA R3000 crankset you ...


4

In general, you may be able to check the bike manufacturer’s page for your bicycle. They will usually list all the components the bike is built with. However, the list may not be comprehensive, especially if the manufacturer mainly sells lower end brands. Bottom bracket standards can be confusing, because there are a number of variations. In this case, you ...


0

it seems like hand tightening should be sufficient. It isn't. You should tighten it with a wrench. You don't need a ton of torque, but it typically takes more than you can deliver with hand tightening. You want the tool well engaged, ideally bottomed out, and you often can't get there hand tightening even on a brand new crank.


0

I have a 52/39 crank set with an hg51 11/32 cassette. The rear derailleur is a Sora rd-3000 and a Sora sl4000 downtube shifter. It works perfectly. For steep hills and for speed. Had an hg51 8 speed 11/28 and changed it. Where I live there are steep hills.


3

Try removing the black finish with a small wire brush. It may be anondized and difficult to remove. Regrease both sets of threads. I always start by giving the tool a quarter turn or so to the left before proceeding to the right. Seems to line the threads up and helps prevent cross threading. In this area of the bike (cranks, bottom bracket) it's best ...


1

Thanks @Weiwen Ng I was able to find the correct ring I bought SRAM 50T x-sync chainring. Also I bought a chain SRAM CHAIN PC-X1 11 SPEED 118 LINK which fits perfect.


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