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1

With a new bike, the likeliest explanation for excessive chain noise is the indexing of the gears being a bit off. This is easily remedied by manipulating the barrel adjuster at the shifter. This is a round, barrel shaped piece of the shifter at the point where the cable exits the shifter. Clockwise turning of the adjuster results in lower cable tension and ...


6

If you do it with an 11-speed chain on your 7-speed cassette, the rear shifting will be laggy, although once it's on a gear it will work. The better way to do it is keep using a 7/8-speed chain, and space out the front chainrings a little to avoid rub and involuntary pickup. What I do that just works most of the time is use a Wheels Mfg 0.6mm chainring ...


5

The part with the red arrow needs to be turned - as Daniel R Hicks has said righty-loosy instead of righty-tighty Your bottom bracket appears to be a variation on the Thompson bottom bracket. The Thompson bottom bracket uses adjustable spindle cones and cups pressed into the bottom bracket shell like the Ashtabula bottom bracket. Unlike the Ashtabula ...


0

Looking it up, this appears to be a 24mm FSA Mega Exo crank that presumably uses square-edged splines of some sort. If so, the first thing to look at is the spline interface on the drive side cranks. Cranks of this sort have very little tolerance to damage to the splined interface. Any rounding, mashing, distortion, etc, and the crank is toast. Usually, ...


1

As discussed in comments, the part in question was not crank bolt but dust cap. The standard dust cap thread is 22x1mm, but often they are plastic parts that are just pressed in or even more commonly, part of the crank bolt.


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