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27

V-brakes can be hateful and make a lot of sound if they're improperly adjusted- sometimes they're noisy even when they're properly adjusted, especially on braking surfaces that are not machined. You can usually alleviate this with one or more of the following methods. First and foremost, make sure your pads are properly adjusted. This is better demonstrated ...


13

return the bike to Cannondale as there is a welding fault in the area north of the front part of the frame If true, that bike is probably not safe to ride. If the shop showed you where the problem is, posting a picture of that area would probably be useful. For what it's worth, if the shop that sold you the bicycle says it has an unsafe frame, I'd tend to ...


10

Square taper cranks are easily damaged if they a ridden loose. You may find that the only fix is to replace the crank. If after tightening to the correct torque they continue to loosen, they must be replaced. Over tightening, while tempting, is not the correct solution and will lead to maintenace problems down the track. (Essentially someone will have to ...


7

You need to isolate this noise to identify the cause. Its great that you can duplicate the noise without having to ride. Try these suggestions to help narrow down the cause. squeeze the rear of the front wheel and the downtube together with your hand. This will replicate some of the stopping forces on your headset. We know the brakes show the problem ...


7

As others have said the bike may not be safe to ride. A frame failure when riding can cause a nasty crash. Don;t ride it. You must return the bike. It's faulty and dangerous. I think there are some issues with what Evans cycles have told you to do though. I think you are saying they told you to work with Canondale directly to return the bike and get a ...


6

Turns out it was the rear skewer of all things causing the creaking! It seemed like it was from the bottom bracket area because it was in sync with my pedalling but I put a dab of grease near the contact points of the skewers and the noise is gone. So if anyone else is having similar problems, check your skewers first because it's a lot easier than taking ...


5

If the noise appears when you create more torque it's almost certainly bottom bracket or crank related. You can get creaks in the rear wheel but they tend to manifest in lower gears because that's when the torque on the rear hub is highest. Cannondales are fairly notorious for creaking in the bottom bracket. The problem is that the bearing cups are slightly ...


5

Locktite blue (also known as 243), or other similar thread lock liquids may eliminate the bottom bracket threads coming loose. Another method to stop creaks between the BB and the frame is to use plumbers teflon tape. Just one or two wraps on the BB threads before installation will keep the bottom bracket from backing out and fill voids to eliminate ...


4

Creaking when only in the saddle - I would check the saddle? A drop of oil into the where the saddle rails fix to the seat can alleviate. But if you are sure it is not this - then perhaps try isolating the noise by using the bike on a static trainer and pedalling. If you remove the chain from engaging with the chainset - it would isolate the noise to the ...


4

I've got the same problem on (what I believe is) a 2013 3.1. I was going to try replacing/upgrading the bottom bracket myself soon, hoping to smooth out the ride. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find the size online so I'll need to take it out and inspect before I can order a replacement, hopefully this goes smoothly. Either way, I'll update with my ...


4

Often, dirt gets between the seat post and seat tube. Remove the seat post. Clean the post. Clean inside the seat tube. Grease the post and re-install. Hopefully the noise will be gone. You say the post is close to the max mark. For a little added safety, longer seat posts are available.


4

Don't ride before servicing thos-e pedals. A poorly greased or loose pedal will ruin the thread of the crank or may even cause breakage of the pedal axle. A correctly tightened but non-greased pedal thread may cause the threads to fuse. You should remove both pedals, clean the threads and the crank arms, apply grease and thread them back in. In case you own ...


4

Park Tool offers the RC-1 specific press fit BB retaining compound. As I understand it expands slightly when cured to take up space between bearings and slightly oversize frame cups.


4

So, thanks for your input guys. I solved it by dismantling the headset and fork and re-greasing all the bearings and where they are seated after a thorough clean. the 'upper' bearing below the headset had a little rust and was bone dry. After the greasing it is now buttery smooth and silent.


4

Spare wheels make the creaking go away. Given that, check the wheels that creak thoroughly. Look for loose spokes and cracks in the rims, especially for cracks around the spoke holes. Several years ago I had exactly the same problem - creaks while riding on a specific front wheel that I couldn't locate. The creaks finally stopped when the rim cracked ...


3

It's hard to tell if it will be OK, and it will depend on how heavy you are and how much pedaling torque you can produce. The main problem you are going to face is not the reduction in area of the taper surface, but that the puller will have pushed the edges of the gouged area up, so that the crank will not fit quite properly on the spindle taper. Because ...


3

My frame is cracked. There's a small crack that's forming on the bottom of the down tube, about half an inch away from the head tube weld. I noticed it because the paint on that spot came off (due to flexing I suppose). The noises are becoming more pronounced. I guess I'll try to get it welded, and if that doesn't work I'll just replace the frame.


3

Also make sure the washers are set correctly.


3

Most probably, the seatpost just needs to be cleaned (dust gets in) AND/OR tightened a little bit. Don't overdo it, it's best to stay within the 5-6 Nm range so as not to bust your seatpost ring or seat tube. Greasing the seatpost might also help. I wouldn't recommend any actual grease for this (messy, tends to get the seatpost stuck after a year of riding), ...


3

I had a similar issue- creaking w downstroke on both sides. Tried greasing pedals cranks seat clamp- no change. Pulled seat post and end was shiny from rubbing in tube. Greased post and blissful quiet.


3

In my experience, when tightening the quick release only temporarily solves the problem, try putting a little grease between the rear derailleur hanger and the dropout. Often it is the seat post but ruled that out since you said it gets louder when sprinting out of the saddle. Good luck!


3

It's hard to give a complete answer without having some internal diameter (ID) measurements from the shell. You want to know whether you're dealing with ovalisation, too small of an ID, or what. If it is an ovalisation type problem ("ovalisation" may be somewhat of a misnomer because if so it was probably made that way as opposed to being an acquired problem)...


3

I found the culprit(most likely): it was the cogs digging into the freehub body, as seen in the post here. I imagine the cassette lockring wasn't tight enough. The recommended torque is 50Nm but since I don't have a torque wrench that big, I've tightened it how tight I believed was enough, last time I removed the cassette. At the time of removing the ...


3

Possibility 1: Take the clamping system apart and clean the parts. Then reassemble with the metal to metal contact surfaces properly greased. Possibility 2: Replace the saddle with one of better quality as the most probable cause for creaking could be the saddle itself, especially where the rails are lodged in the shell. If you want to go a step further and ...


3

Try a light drop of a wet lube perhaps one that you put on a bike chain at the points of contact on the saddle rails. That helped on some SPD pedals and my cleat that made a squeak every now and again as I rode. Hope that helps.


3

The most common cause of this with XD cassettes is simple under-torquing of the "lockring"/locking sleeve/whatever you want to call it. SRAM's number is 40Nm. The sleeve turns with quite a bit of resistance inside the rest of the casssette on XD cassettes, which can lead to not having it actually tightened on right as the friction is eating up ...


3

Solved. rear derailleur hanger is the culprit.


2

I'll tell you my scenario and what worked for me. I'll list, in chronological order, all the changes I made, because in the end it might have been a combination of changes which fixed the problem and not the final step alone. The bike: a steel hybrid bicycle with v-brakes; single walled rim, with black anodization; new brake pads. Rim condition: the ...


2

Remove your cranks, clean the spindle ends with alcohol (but don't get it on the bearings), then reassemble and torque the bolts to max specified torque with a torque wrench. The issue is very slight contamination between the two parts, leaving a gap for infinitesimal movement. You could also try torquing it first, before disassembly. It must be very tight.


2

More than likely the crank arm is not sitting on the BB spindle correctly, very common! See if you can define where the creak originates, if it is from the chainset side, the following will apply; Perhaps slightly dirty when installed, both the spindle and the corresponding contact surface of the crank arm or chainset must be clean then greased on ...


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