7

Here is a picture of instructions for a tool similar to yours. This picture shows putting a screwdriver in the holes to drive out the crown race. Since yours are threaded I'd put a bolt in each hole and hammer on that. Not a fan of hammering screwdrivers. Here's another similar tool close up to indicate orientation.


2

Probably not, and it doesn't look like it. Integrated crown races on road bikes are usually found on all-carbon forks and they were also nascent then if they existed at all. Also, the part indicated by the arrow looks an awful lot like the split of a crown race that slides on: If it's not a slip on type and is simply a difficult to remove one with no ...


2

Yes, it should. Grease all the contact surfaces.


1

Here are posted instructions from a review of a similar tool: The key to using this is not to overdo it. Just tighten the tool slowly and evenly enough to get the edges under the crown race then turn the fork around and tap the tool as shown in the video. Tighten the tool a little more and again turn upside down and tap a little more. Little by little and ...


1

The Cane Creek 40 system uses cartridge bearings. The crown race of this bearing system is generally to support cartridge bearing, ie: it doesn't actually have bearing balls "racing" on it. Those are contained between the 2 halves of the cartridge bearing. What this means is that one can use a split crown race without interfering with the bearing ...


1

My gut instinct says no grease. Point one, The Park tool manual makes no mention of applying grease to the fork. Second point is that generally you don't want grease in continuous contact with carbon fiber. Third point is that by lubricating the interface you risk the inner race spinning on the fork. The idea is for the fork and inner race to move at the ...


1

It seems like the fork has an integrated crown race. Should it be greased before assembly and pre-loading? Current headsets have a conical or spherical seat for the cartridge bearings. The purpose of this seat is to absorb shocks that the bearing would be unable to otherwise absorb. This absorption requires the seat to be greased. With no grease, it won't ...


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