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17

A good safe biking distance is the distance that one can enjoy the bike ride to work, get there a few minutes early to clean up or shower and after work enjoy another bike ride home and still spare some time to spend with family/ loved ones/have a life besides work and the commute. I limit my bike commute to about an hour each way.


11

A google reverse image search tells me it's a Martone Sweetzer (US) or Real (European version). http://www.martonecycling.eu/product-EU-5-25-Womens_Real From certain features of the frame (the bend in the top tube etc.) I'd say that's the same bike, but that your picture is of a slightly customised version with a different saddle and grips.


10

Many BMX levers are hinged, so they don't require messing with the grip. These can be had for either short pull (canti/caliper/u-brake) or long pull (v-brake/mechanical disc), so make sure to get the right pull. They're intended for one or two finger use. Various basic "touring" levers, of the stamped sheet metal variety, also go on and off without removing ...


9

Short answer: whoever is describing it. There are a bunch of dictionary definitions around that all centre on the "lying down" part, which doesn't help when there are recumbents with quite upright seating positions: as well as (semi?) recumbents with quite small backrests and seats off upright bikes: At the other extreme, of course, you have the virtually ...


6

Your 26" tires sit on wheel rims, whose diameter is probably 559 mm. 24" tires will not fit onto these rims; to use 24" "junior" tires you actually need smaller wheels, of a 507 mm diameter. These smaller wheels require a different frame. Smaller rims require a different frame mainly because hardware related to the wheel which is mounted to the larger frame ...


6

This bicycle is a Micargi Mustang. See this Google search. An an image from this website:


6

There are many factors that go into determining the performance of a tyre. The material and thread count (TPI) of the carcass, the rubber compound, thickness and tread pattern. Tubed vs tubeless, and many different varieties of puncture protection layers. Unfortunately as a consumer (especially with lesser known brands) its virtually impossible to be sure ...


6

Whether the cruiser style bike is suitable for the 'mountain bike trails' you are riding on really depends on exactly what those trails are like. The cruiser has pretty big tires so it should be able to handle rough surfaces just fine. If you are riding those trails and it feels OK, then it's OK. Cheap bikes from big-box stores with Shimano 'Tourney' level ...


5

You will have no problem with the brake levers. The force you apply to the levers is between your fingers on the lever and the palm of your hand on the bar grip, so the angle of your hand with respect to you body does not matter very much. If you want to convince yourself, sit on your bike, turn the handlebars slightly so the bar is at an angle less than 90°...


4

Just had a little Google for it (town bike cruiser green) and found it it on Pinterest. The bike is a "Chubby's Custom Green Stretch Cruiser" price is $324.99. Website is www.chubbysbikes.com


4

It would depend on a lot of things, such as terrain, weather, traffic etc. If you are not sure, simply ride a few kilometers and you would be in a position to guess. Safety hazards increase as you get tired, it will affect your judgment and reaction speed. You can get a guess on that by doing some trial riding. One thing that is for sure is that the more ...


4

You want stainless spokes and aluminum rims. As suggested in the comments you can check the rims with a magnet – and also by appearance steel rims will probably be shiny. But steel rims are kind of rare, most likely you'll have aluminum on any reasonably priced bike. For the spokes it may be hard to tell with a magnet. I think the easiest way to tell would ...


4

Ok there are a number of questions in there. 1) 29" vs 26": that's not a question of which would hold your weight better or worse. 29" rolls a bit better, especially over rough ground, so if that's important to you, then go for 29". A bike with a very small frame for a short person, will work better with smaller wheels - i.e. 26" - but at 5'7" I reckon ...


4

Start with the easier things before busting out the spanners! Check the bike over. Low pressure tyres are very hard to ride, so add air with a pump. Look for anything wrong, that's anything rubbing or otherwise out of line. Walk the bike around and make sure it coasts okay. Rotate the pedal crank while lifting the rear wheel off the ground and make sure it ...


4

There's a small chance you don't have as much hand/arm strength as you used to. A coaster brake provides a way to slow while leaving your arms free to focus on steering. That said, a coaster brake is a rear brake only. The best stopping happens with the front brake, so ideally you'd have both, a coaster for the rear and a hand brake lever for the front.


4

Going out on a limb, my guess is that the chain is too tight. I've seen (heard) this issue on many bikes like this. On about 98% of big box store bicycles are sold with all the bearings and the chain too tight and the tires too low on air. How tight should it be?: The chain slack on a bicycle ... is quite critical, and is regulated by moving the rear ...


4

-brakes rubbing? -quality of the tyres -quality of the bearings


3

Most likely no. That is too big of a difference in wheel sizes. The frame does not likely have enough room for the larger wheels. If you have rim brakes there would also be the problem of adjusting the brake pad position for the larger wheel. You could always go to a shop or swap wheels from another bike just to see if they will fit, but I think it is very ...


3

Forty years ago Huffy bikes were actually pretty well made, just heavy, ugly, and not very nimble. But now that everything is made in China, as cheaply as possible, it's hard to predict the quality. First off, you need to keep the tires properly inflated. This is a seemingly trivial but incredibly important (and often overlooked) maintenance item. Also ...


3

To install a front brake you will need to have a fork that will accept the brake caliper. There are three potential options for this: A standard road caliper (hole through the fork crown), cantilever/ v-brakes ( one post on either side of the fork blade) or a disc mount (bracket at the end of the fork on the non-drive side). The Masi Soulville should have ...


3

4656 is the model number. It's also the order number in the catalog. There are books for sale on Ebay that show the bicycle pages from the Sears catalogs that cover Elgin, JC Higgins, and Sears bikes from the early 30's through the mid 60's. Each page tells the year from which the pages are taken. Match the number on the bike to the cataolg number and you ...


3

Quality of tires is mainly quality of rubber. The rubber is responsible for the grip of the tire (braking and cornering) time to wear down rolling resistance The second strongest indicator for quality is the carcass. This determines things like puncture resistance behavior when cornering (you don't want to ride tires that "crawl away" in the ...


3

I would consider it scrap metal. There are a few safety concerns. While millions of us survived childhood on bikes like these they don't meet current safety standards. The single coaster brake means that if the chain broke or fell off there would be no brakes. Modern bikes have hand brake mounted along with the coaster brake. The lack of a chain guard is a ...


3

Here's a dyno7 showing where bearings are. A headset has exactly two bearings, because they preload against each other. There is no place for a third bearing. Possibilities Somehow, someone used two bearing rings and somehow interleaved them. I can't see this fitting and rolling at all. there's some form of dust cap that has popped off and looks like a ...


3

Adding photos of the two bikes might help, but I'd guess that tyre pressure and body fit/position are the two main differences. The bikes are not the same obviously, so subtle differences can sap one's power. Weight isn't that big a deal when riding on the flat - it takes a bit longer to get a heavier bike up to the same speed, but keeping it there is a ...


2

Traffic, weather, and geography would make a world of difference. On a dry day at 68°F, 10 miles would be great. If you have to take several pedestrian bridges to cross major arteries in hot, humid weather, even 1 mile could wear on you. I do 1.55 miles with pretty-much no traffic (crossing one semi-major road to get to work), but this Florida weather does ...


2

Other answers have touched on this but not explicitly. The main safety point I would say is how you ride when you're tired. If you're exhausted and can't keep a straight line up a busy hill, don't think to look over your shoulder in time etc., that's bad and getting dangerous. tiredness can really hit your judgement and reaction times. Otherwise it ...


2

As an update to this, there are now multiple versions of Citi Bikes. The ones you want (if maximizing speed is your interest) are these ones: not these ones: Note the difference in the fender—this is the easiest way to tell the difference. You can also tell them apart by the rear light: the good ones have a single light on the fender, while the bad ones ...


2

74 years old fairly new at biking (2 years)with a recent hip replacement. Been riding a Townie beach cruiser for 35 miles and I am working to reach my 50 miles goal. The Townie is fine for any distances in my opinion and you feel safer because of the easy dismount.Recently also purchased a Townie fat tire bike for long distances. In my opinion it takes a bit ...


2

This is not really a safety issue, but one of practicality and convenience. I commute a total of 6 miles each way, every day, rain-or-shine in a humid climate. The most important thing to consider is not the bike, but your clothing and amenities at your destination. I use a backpack and carry a change of clothes and my laptop (using plastic bags for ...


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