31

TL:DR Get the CX Bike, you'll love it! You get three bikes in one, without trading in any noticeable performance on the road. This answer is subjective and based on personal experience, you have been warned: I have a CX bike that is used as a do-it-all bike, and I love it. For almost all aspects that concern any non-professional cyclist a CX is as good, or ...


14

If you have the budget for only one more bicycle you cannot go wrong with a cyclocross bike, you will be able to race CX in the fall (typically after triathlon season) and you can get some fenders and slick tires for road rides in winter/spring and take the fenders off when the weather turns nice for Triathlon season. You can get clip on aero bars if you ...


13

You certainly can use a cyclocross bike for almost everything and cyclocross bikes also make a fantastic winter trainer or touring bike. Key Differences between a cyclcoross and road bike Longer seat stays and chain stays lead to an increased wheelbase when compared to a road bike which can have a nagetive effect on cornering at speed.Cyclocross framesets ...


12

Try stopping with one foot down, leaning the bike over and leaving your dominant leg on the pedal with the pedal forward and up ready for a power stroke. By leaning the bike over you can get lots of clearance. I can often even remain on the saddle. When you're ready to go, push off with your non-dominant leg (which is touching the ground) and give a strong ...


12

Depends on your road bike, but for the most part no. Reasons against Many road bikes are limited to tire width of 25 or 28mm. Because cycle cross is off-road you need to find tires with knobbies. This really isn't possible for such small tire sizes as most knobby tires available start at around 32mm or large. Even if you could find knobby tires this small,...


11

Cyclocross bikes will have a slightly different geometry. More like a relaxed road geometry with a higher bottom bracket than a road bike typically. You'll be stretched out a bit less and more upright. Cross frames also will have wider tire clearances for 32mm to 35mm tires, but it varies by model as some can fit 38mm to 45mm tires. Traditionally, brakes ...


11

Short answer: No. Long Answer: I would not use carbon rims for commuting for several reasons: They make the bike look more shiny than you want, attracting all kinds of unwanted attention. I ride my commuter bike in any weather without too much maintenance. Should the carbon rim fail at some point, I at least won't notice a hairline crack until the wheel ...


11

If you are going to use your bike mostly for commuting, I would like to suggest you go for cyclocross. The reasons are: Motorist Hazard: There are always ignorant motorist who think they can save a lot of time by ignoring checking blind spots, appropriate speed at junction, quickly overtake without leaving sufficient space for cyclist. The less time you ...


11

The Crossrip line isn't quite a cyclocross bike; its designed somewhere between a commuter bike and a cyclocross bike (more relaxed and heavier than most cyclocross bikes; also, rack+fender mounts). FWIW, I do know people who have used the Crossrip for light touring and a day to day basis and were happy. But if you'll be happy is a highly personal decision. ...


10

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


9

Unfortunately there's no magic formula. A lot depends on your age and training base going into the race season. There are two things you need to balance: Intervals/speed workout. Burnout/injuries. You will see the fastest gain in the shortest time doing intervals, but you also put yourself at the greatest risk for injury/burnout. Given that you're ...


9

It sounds like what you want is a gravel or adventure bike. There is not a distinct category, and different manufacturers use different names, but the basic attributes you are looking for are: Road bike style frame, ISO 622 rims, drop bars Clearance for up to about 40mm tires Disc, linear pull (V) or cantilever brakes Slacker steering geometry More relaxed ...


8

A CX bike is stable, strong, and will take wider tires. It is a great road and commute bicycle. It is built to race in city parks. It has a comfortable riding position. Just put touring tires on it (I like 35mm). I don't mean to advertise a bike but if you look at a high end CX like Moots the even say use as light touring. Rout You are not going to ...


8

Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


8

DT Swiss publishes the exact document you are looking for: Manuals page / RIMS / Tire Pressure/Dimension (PDF) The document specifies the maximum usable tire pressure based on rim and tire width. More narrow tires allow for higher pressures. For example, the rims in the question (XR 400, inner width 18 mm) are compatible with tires ranging from 23 mm width ...


8

You could try replacing your current pads with a set that come with double conical washers. It sounds, and looks, like this set of pads doesn't have them, but there appears to be enough space for you to install them. The washers come in pairs, one concave and one convex, with enough "slop" to allow them to sit at an angle as the pad mounting screw passes ...


8

What you need is known as a "Chain ring spanner" or a "Chain ring peg spanner". Very cheap to purchase.


7

This does not work in the specific case of a Sram CX1 rear derailleur, or the case of any other X-Horizon™ mechanisms. I purchased the CX1 derailleur and attempted with a 46/39 front chainring combo. The CX1 RD allows the front shift to occur, but has no tolerance for changes in chain length (e.g. front shifting). The change in chainring size impacts the ...


7

The reason that rims have maximum tire pressures is because the tire presses out at the bead seat. This load is carried by the "bend" in the 'U' shape of the rim. Higher pressures put more stress on the rim and, given enough pressure, will cause it to fail either at the bend or perhaps through the spoke holes if that is the weak point. With rims designed ...


7

This is a deceptively complex question because it touches on many aspects of hub design, and answering it properly would also require taking some kind of survey of what design choices have wound up getting made for the various convertible vs. dedicated size through axle hubs, particularly in terms of what bearing sizes are used. Furthermore, for practical ...


7

The frame is 100% trash. Do not attempt to use it at all. What you can do is to carefully remove everything from the frame. Discard the frame, and now you have a whole bunch of valuable parts. You can either buy a new (possibly second hand) frame, or just sell the parts to finance the purchase of another bike. There are a few parts you won't be able to ...


7

I am unsure of the equipment provisions that the UCI puts on cyclocross racing, though with that not being considered it is possible yes. A lot of people have converted older steel frames and road bikes into cyclocross bikes with great success. One thing to consider though is that the newer cyclocross frames generally have wider clearance for larger knobby ...


7

TR160-35 is the model number. They are 160mm Centerlock rotors. If your new wheels have Centerlock hubs, then you need either centerlock rotors or adaptors. If the wheels are 6-bolt, then you need 6-bolt rotors. Either way you'll want 160mm rotors and to keep it easy, I'd stick with Tektro rotors for this system.


6

Cross bikes do have a different geometry than most modern road bikes, key word being modern. Cross bikes typically have a longer wheelbase and chainstays to accomodate larger tires, in addition they usually but not always have a slightly higher bottom bracket though I know many dudes who race cross with a 7cm bb drop and that is no higher than most road ...


6

A cross bike will do a little bit of everything fairly well. A triathlon bike will only do time trials. You're also going to have more options at the $1k range with a cross bike. Slim pickins at that price point for a tri bike. Get some clip on aero bars and get a cross bike. If down the road you really get eaten up with triathlon, and get a dedicated tri ...


6

A lot of people commute on cross bikes just fine (and even prefer them to conventional road bikes). He's full of it - the amount you'd need to forget to have issues is roughly being confused enough to think you're an onion (and if you're this confused, well, you're screwed anyway!), especially at commuting speeds. There are different bicycles for different ...


6

Cyclocross courses are (generally) too smooth and relatively fast to warrant the use of suspension. Sure, it might be more comfortable, but the added weight would only slow you down and leave you behind your competitors on a typical muddy course.


6

Based on comparison with the Giant Defy Advanced line, it seems to mean that you can run an electronic drivetrain (such as Shimano Di2 parts) - you have to mount things like a battery in order for the shifters to work and what not, so the frame will need to have the wiring harnesses and battery pack mounted. This link shows the TCR line in 2012 with this ...


6

One good reason to stick with cantilever is easier wheel swaps. Last weekend races, my son flatted and we did not put spare wheels in the pits. Neutral support had spare wheels and if my son had a disc based bike he would not of been able to use them. Even if neutral support had disc wheels, with differences in rotor size they may not work for your bike. ...


6

Why should you prioritize top tube length over stand over? Because top tube length affects fit and stand over does not affect fit. When you are riding the bike stand over does not affect fit. My CX only has 1" of stand over. A big triangle is good for stiffness and shoulder carry. A tall top tube means faster transition to shoulder carry. I don't get ...


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