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4

I am 99% sure the dent in the fork blade is damage, and probably part of the problem you're seeing. The way you set up the two sections of allthread in the dropouts is smart, and is similar to the way dropouts are aligned. You could try to set the dropouts into alignment with the setup you've got, or bring the bike to a shop that has proper alignment tools, ...


0

I'm going to throw this out there as even under close zoom, I can't tell for sure, but.... It's the crank arm that has busted leaving a chunk of itself still attached to the BB spindle (which is perhaps an Octalink or Isis interface. It appears to be round). Based on the photo showing misshapen, silver chunk I think that it is probably aluminum alloy which ...


4

As Criggie says, bottom bracket has to be replaced. Axles in cartridge type bottom brackets cannot be removed or replaced. They are held in by pressed in bearings. I can see it's a square taper axle type the axles on Octalink and other splined types have a greater diameter). Those are common and not hugely expensive. Different model cranks need different ...


6

You've broken your bottom bracket's axle. There is no way to safely reattach, so you're up for a replacement bottom bracket. Ideally you'd install a cartridge BB that duplicates what you have. The crank arm (in your hand) is probably okay to reuse, though have a good clean and a close inspection before doing so. Dings are fine, chips maybe, and cracks are ...


2

Have you thought about a bike cover or bicycle wheel covers ? This seems the most logical form of protection for little outlay, the most effective method would be to move the bike out of reach of the cats but if that’s not possible then a cover of some sort may suffice. If the cover isn’t suitable or the cats destroy it, you could easily make a bike stand ...


1

Do the cats do it while people are around? Then a spray bottle of water can be used to deter them at the instant they start. Yes, its slightly mean to the cats, but once they learn then the problem goes away. Or store the bikes in a room with a closed door, keep the door closed.


1

I think your idea "some sort of removable, thick rubber coating (perhaps a second, larger pair of tires cut to fit over mounting)" would probably work. I would store the bike upside down and use old mountain bike tires. If that fails, perhaps try inexpensive hard plastic tubing used for underground sprinkler systems, about 1.5 inch diameter. With ...


1

I would peel the rim tape off, and then carefully file off the high spots. Then stop and reassess and if it seems okay I'd use emery cloth to smooth it out completely. If the pits feel too deep, you might fill them with JB Weld or similar. You need a smooth surface for the tube to rest on. If you reuse the rim tape, consider flipping it 180 degrees to ...


4

In the photo it looks like you have damaged the rim tape, not the actual rim. You should be able to replace it without touching the rest. The tape on photo says tubeless ready: if you are planning to go tubeless you should replace it with similar one, but if you plan to use tubes, any high pressure tape will work.


0

I've been looking at tourers recently and they tend to have 36 spoke wheels (as does my hybrid on the back after I broke my original rim). A touring bicycle needs a durable wheel, something that is repairable with lightweight equipment carried with you if it fails, and something that is likely to not fail in the first place. What I don't understand is why ...


-8

I am not bothered with the cutting of the foam if it is just cosmetic but obviously I would need to know that the helmet is not compromised before I can use it. Every single helmet built barely to spec is compromised. If you consider the bicycle as a rod whose weight is evenly distributed, when the bicycle falls with tire contact point as the pivot point, ...


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