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The gears just do not switch reliably under the load. You may end up with the previous gear remaining all hill up or, also not unusual, with the chain dropped. Don't known, likely it also bad for the bicycle but makes no sense to ride this way even if it would not. Depending on the load and if you are switching up or down this may be more or less problematic ...


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Related - switching gears in an Internal Gear Hub (aka an IGH) under load causes the gearbox to not switch immediately. I have had situations with a Shimano Alfine 11 where pedalling hard, and changing gear in either direction meant the gearbox stayed in the same gear. When going up a hill and trying to change to a lower/easier gear, it just wouldn't until ...


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You are much better off learning to ease the load before switching gears! Assuming you have the widespread derailleur kind (as opposed to in-hub gears)... 1. Front derailleur, switch under heavy load: Large ring to small ring: Nothing bad will happen. The chain will rub against the derailleur which will wear out a bit and the switch will just not happen ...


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Expanding on a comment I made on Gregory's answer: I agree fully that it's better not to shift under load. However, modern drivetrains are much less sensitive to shifts under load than older ones. You will have noisier rear shifts. For front downshifts, I believe there's a small chance you can drop your front chainring; as Vladimir stated, on some frames you ...


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I have heard several times the wisdom that you should not switch gears while pedalling hard ("under load"). It is true that an optimal gear shift works by easing the load, shifting while rotating the pedals with practically zero load, and resuming the load after the shift has happened. With practice, it is possible to time the shifting in such a ...


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in my experience it is better to shift gears with no load on the chain. So there is no rattle. My bike is over 9 years old and is in good working order.


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The answer heavily depends on the groupset construction/generation and personal perception of what is "bad", among other factors. Below are a few aspects that I am aware of. Switching gears in the traditional bicycle drivetrain assumes there is a momentarily side load on the chain, twisting it and forcing it to jump/fall from one cog to another. ...


10

You can quite easily get your chain dropped. If you were standing and pushing hard in a climb you could even fall. If the chain drops to a bad place, it can damage your frame near your bottom bracket or it can damage your spokes or similar.


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When you are pedalling hard, you are putting a lot of "force" into the chain, which is transmitted to/from the chain via the mechanical contact between chain and gear teeth. If you are putting a lot of force and you shift, there are some brief moment when all your force is applied torsionally to one tooth only, by a chain that is not alignated but ...


1

I'll approach the question by taking the listed parameters and offering some thoughts as to time/cost/ money. Overall, building up a working bicycle from a bare--or nearly so--frame is extremely satisfying experience interspersed with periods of frustration, disappointment and sometimes boredom when a project drags on too long (& who's to say what that ...


4

I've finished a bike to nearly your exact specifications. I came into a Trek navigator 300 frame that I've converted as my "Grocery Touring" bike. Although I've taken curbed bikes and fixed them up for friends as a hobby, building a bike from scratch is much more rewarding and can be cost effective with some patience. I got impatient with ...


8

This is the classic "how long is a piece of string" question, where almost any answer is valid. At one end you have a frame. And enough skills and time to assemble a bike, along with the desire/need. If you can source every part you need from your spares boxes, then the cost is nothing more than your time. On the other end if all you have is a ...


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