18

You have a zero cost solution, which is to keep the front derailleur but remove the cable (and shifter if you like). Then use the FD limit screws to fix it in the right position to act as a chain guide. You don't need a 1x chainring, in fact using one with a 7 speed chain is probably less than ideal, so you're actually better off sticking with an existing ...


15

Fifteen years ago the answer was a simple "Yes". Today's 10, 11, and 12 speed chains are not designed to be reassembled this way, and in fact, will reliably break or fail where you reuse the rivet. For these new narrow chains, simply use a replacement rivet on Shimano, or master link on SRAM or other. For older bikes, or chains designed for 9 or fewer rear ...


10

If the chainrings are in good order, I would recommend servicing the front derailleur and continue to run it as 3x. The reason is that front dérailleurs rust quickly but are often chrome plated and it’s actually easy to remove the rust. If the derailleur is temperamental it is typically solved by replacing the shifter inner cable ($1 on eBay) and ...


8

Shimano lists the FD-R7000 front derailleur as compatible with the FC-5800 crankset in their products compatibility information, but the R7000 crankset wont be compatible with the old derailleur.


6

Neither system is better than the other. In some situations, 1x is better, in others, 2x is better. As cassette range expands, effectively because the largest cog is getting bigger, the advantageous of 2x (or 3x) are decreasing. (SRAM just released a 1x12 with a 10-50 cassette, which is probably the nail in the coffin of 2x in the top end gear sets on MTBs). ...


6

An 11-speed chain will mesh with and be driven by a ring designated 8-speed without issue, barring corner case exceptions. (There's nothing necessarily stopping manufacturers from cheating or being sloppy with keeping everything that's nominally 3/32 cross-compatible even with parts of disparate eras/types as in this example, but it's not an issue one sees ...


6

Sounds like you have a bit too much cable tension in your new configuration. Usually cable tension is tuned with the barrel adjuster you mentioned, but if you cannot get the tension low enough with it, you'll need to loosen the bolt that attaches the cable to the derailleur, give the cable just a bit more slack and try again.


6

'E type' is a front derailleur attachment standard. Some frames provide an E type mounting point directly, some require a 'back plate' that provides the mount point that is clamped by the bb cup. As far as I can tell, some back plates are clamped by the cup and have no other provision to prevent rotation. There is not very much fore or aft force on the ...


5

Front derailleur is not a particularly important component to optimise, in my opinion, since it only touches the chain when being operated (assuming it is correctly set up so the chain doesn't rub). I doubt Shimano sells any derailleurs that don't "do the job" of shifting gears, so at worst the shifting in the front will be a bit worse and the components ...


5

with a bigger chainring you may simply need to install the front mech higher up the seat tube.. The outer part of the 'cage', if correctly positioned should be just a couple of millimetres above the biggest chainring when you change up.. Not sure this answers your question but i hope so...!


5

Easy and cheap option - remove FD (change chain ring by hand if needed). Put it back on for summer riding. More expensive - Go to a full 1x - cost is the only limiting factor As its disk brakes, you could install a 27.5" rear wheel with a small change to bike geometry (this will help if chain stay clearance is too small on 29" rim). In all honesty, I ...


5

According to Shimano front derailleur specs here all road triple front derailleurs support max 50 tooth and have 20 tooth capacity (max difference between largest and smallest rings). The general consensus on this site is that Shimano is quite conservative in it's specifications so overstepping the max chainring and capacity by 2 teeth will probably work ...


4

The front derailleur doesn't care what the rear derailleur is and vice versa. The front derailleur is matched with the front chainring sizes, number of chainrings, mounting type of the front derailleur (a property of the frame) and the front shifter. The rear derailleur is matched to the shifter (for indexing; the shifter is matched to the cassette), and ...


4

This link says the frame has the necessary cable stops for a front shifter and front derailleur. You'll need a new crankset (you can find 9 speed+ triples or doubles pretty cheap these days). This may require a new bottom bracket as well, depending on which crankset you choose (I'd guess whats on there is just standard square taper) and the chainline ...


4

Those are the seat tube diameters that the derailleur will fit onto. Bicycle seat tubes vary in size for a range of reasons (which is also why we have different size seatposts). In this case it looks as though one derailleur is giving you a list of three sizes that work, the other is giving a range. I suspect they're equivalent, since the maximum and ...


4

You may be able to adjust the friction. Adjusting the tension in the cable probably won't help. This is a bit of a known issue with some combinations: https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/1069395-shimano-rd-5701-hard-shift-friction-shifters.html http://forums.roadbikereview.com/components-wrenching/shimano-friction-shifter-adjustment-183941.html ...


4

Put a larger tire on the front and don't worry about running a larger tire on the rear. Back when North Shore BC riding was just starting to take off (i.e., 1990s) we often did this setup as we were equipment limited. At the time the "thinking" was that it was bizarre ride a tire bigger than a 2.0 anything but a dedicated race downhill bike. So we would ...


4

I have the same model front derailleur and have experienced the same issue. It is unlikely that the bike is bending enough under pedalling force to cause this (unless the frame is broken or cracked). More likely it is a problem with the front derailleur, and the extra chain tension from pedalling hard exacerbates it. Now, obviously if there is damage such ...


4

With doubles this sort of setup can usually be made to work reasonably well. There's at least one bike I know of on the market with the exact setup you describe, the 2019 Salsa Fargo Tiagra, and it does work. Putting a triple STI on a mountain front triple crank and derailleur is where it gets bad.


4

Shimano prides itself on seamless shifting and it's specs are quite conservative to preserve that reputation. With a little sensible caution and a chain catcher you should be able to replace the 26 with a 22. 22/36 is a big drop. If you are just going to replace a single chainring, I'd suggest a 24 rather than 22. When cogs are that small, even 2 teeth is a ...


4

Yes, but.... If your shifter is a 2 position brifter (ie an STI lever) then it will only be in the right place on one chainring. The second position may be acceptable, or it may be off enough to create clatter. The third chainring will be unavailable to you completely. If your shifter is a friction shifter, then the entire set of chainrings will be ...


4

Yes, it's doable. You'll have terrible gear ratio range but you realize this and don't mind. Either find a double-wide chainring that fits the crank, or leave the middle ring in place. You may need shorter chainring bolts as the existing ones have to be long enough to go through the middle and large rings. You can remove the shifter but leave the front ...


3

The rotational position and height not being exactly right would cause this. Shimano now has a more specific procedure then in the past to establish them, which you can see starting on page 5 of the dealer manual. If following the procedure in their manual to a T doesn't work, the other thing you may be looking at is a situation such as Lennard Zinn ...


3

I wouldn't feel too bad about getting the wrong FD here. This is a very easy mistake when ordering a bunch of stuff for an unbuilt bike. Maybe there was a spec sheet available somewhere that advised against low clamp for your frame, or maybe not. You shouldn't run that FD because, suspension clearance and any other issues aside, you've mounted it as low as ...


3

As the mnemonic goes: "Lefty loosey - righty tighty" The indicated way to turn is always relative to the object the screw / the thread is fixed to. Examples: If you turn the barrel on th rear derailleur towards the wheel, it's loosening. It tightens away from the bike. The same goes for your STI: in this case loosening is towards the bar, tighening ...


3

Cable tension Limit Screws Derailleur position/angle These are the only things that actually affect your shifting mechanically. If those are all proper, something is broken/misaligned/shredded.


3

Having had exactly the same problem I tracked it down to the shifter, and as a previous contributor stated it is the manufacturer’s grease that gets sticky and stops smooth operation. There is a ratchet mechanism in place with a small metal pawl which has a weak spring. The sticky grease stops the pawl (little metal square which engages notches or steps in ...


3

More gears are not necessarily better. Adding a second (or third (or fourth!)) chainring gives more gears, but a lot of them overlap or fit between existing gear ratios. Focusing on the top half of this image Adding a 24 tooth grannie chainring gave that MTB 2 additional gear ratios lower than what the 32 tooth ring could offer, for the same cassette. ...


3

Recumbent / trikes tend to use mountain-bike shifting equipment because they need the extra gear range. While there is a difference in cable pull between road and mountain sets, front shifters on the whole tend to be much less picky than rear shifters about chain width because essentially the limit for front shifting has stayed at 3 chainrings (aside from @...


3

You can buy a braze on derailleur of the type you need and get a Braze on to 28.6 adapter. Alternately, you can get a derailleur with a larger size and get a shim. Either will be perfectly functional. Very few Mountain Bikes have 28.6 downtubes anymore so the likelihood of finding a 28.6 seems pretty low.


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