17

You have a zero cost solution, which is to keep the front derailleur but remove the cable (and shifter if you like). Then use the FD limit screws to fix it in the right position to act as a chain guide. You don't need a 1x chainring, in fact using one with a 7 speed chain is probably less than ideal, so you're actually better off sticking with an existing ...


15

Fifteen years ago the answer was a simple "Yes". Today's 10, 11, and 12 speed chains are not designed to be reassembled this way, and in fact, will reliably break or fail where you reuse the rivet. For these new narrow chains, simply use a replacement rivet on Shimano, or master link on SRAM or other. For older bikes, or chains designed for 9 or fewer rear ...


14

I sell that bike at work. The road/mountain FD mismatch functions very badly. We've had to replace the front derailleurs with road models. The total throw of a road shifter isn't enough for it to shift well and not have rub anywhere. It's terrible. It can be made to kinda sorta work if you accept rub in the lowest gear. But, that shouldn't be acceptable. And ...


12

The reason why shifting is arranged this way: Shifting to a larger chainring at the front gives a higher gear ratio, shifting to a larger sprocket at the rear gives a lower gear ratio. Shifting to larger chainring/sprocket requires positive pulling force from the shifter whereas shifting to smaller chainring/sprocket can be done with derailleur spring ...


10

This is the way most (99.999%) of bikes work. If you really want to change it - I advise against such a move, the only option would be hunt out a (fortunately) now defunct "Rapid Rise" or "Low Normal" rear derailleur. I was unfortunate enough to install one on a MTB in the early 2000's. I still suffer a from of PTSD recalling the decade ...


9

If the chainrings are in good order, I would recommend servicing the front derailleur and continue to run it as 3x. The reason is that front dérailleurs rust quickly but are often chrome plated and it’s actually easy to remove the rust. If the derailleur is temperamental it is typically solved by replacing the shifter inner cable ($1 on eBay) and ...


9

That's the high "trim" position. Most Shimano front road derailleurs have four positions: low, low trim, high, and high trim. If your derailleur is properly adjusted, after you shift the front derailleur to the low-gear position, it will have a position somewhat outboard that can be reached by pushing the brake lever somewhere between 1/4 and 1/2 ...


8

Shimano lists the FD-R7000 front derailleur as compatible with the FC-5800 crankset in their products compatibility information, but the R7000 crankset wont be compatible with the old derailleur.


8

Yes you can, no you should not. Since it is a new bike assembled by the shop, I strongly recommend you let them fix it. And it must be for free (more correct: you already paid for it, they did not delivery an adequate service). You are inexperienced. There is a very slim chance the derailleur is defective (for example the chain guides are weirdly bent after ...


7

Put a larger tire on the front and don't worry about running a larger tire on the rear. Back when North Shore BC riding was just starting to take off (i.e., 1990s) we often did this setup as we were equipment limited. At the time the "thinking" was that it was bizarre ride a tire bigger than a 2.0 anything but a dedicated race downhill bike. So we would ...


7

11 speed GRX 810 and 600 are compatible with 9000, 8000, 7000, 6800, 5800 etc. 11 speed road groups - so it obviously uses the 11 speed cable pull ratio. 10 speed GRX 400 is compatible with the Tiagra 4700 10 speed road group only, so it uses the ‘11 speed’ cable pull ratio as well. Shimano is nice enough to publish very comprehensive (if complicated) ...


7

Shift into the lowest (innermost) gear. This removes the cable tension as much as possible without undoing the pinch bolt and removing the cable Loosen the bolt that clamps the derailleur to the seat tube, rotate the clamp so the the cage is it's parallel to the chain rings, then re-tighten. Make sure you do not move the derailleur up or down the seat tube. ...


7

The little riveted points you mention are pivots, there are a bunch of them. What you can do is spray a little lubricant in each pivoting part of the derailleur, then physically move it side to side by hand a number of times and it should loosen up. Pull it towards you and then push it back, 10, 20, 30 times. It might take a bit of force to start with and ...


6

Neither system is better than the other. In some situations, 1x is better, in others, 2x is better. As cassette range expands, effectively because the largest cog is getting bigger, the advantageous of 2x (or 3x) are decreasing. (SRAM just released a 1x12 with a 10-50 cassette, which is probably the nail in the coffin of 2x in the top end gear sets on MTBs). ...


6

Easy and cheap option - remove FD (change chain ring by hand if needed). Put it back on for summer riding. More expensive - Go to a full 1x - cost is the only limiting factor As its disk brakes, you could install a 27.5" rear wheel with a small change to bike geometry (this will help if chain stay clearance is too small on 29" rim). In all honesty, I ...


6

Use a side swing derailleur such as this one: https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/alivio-m3100/FD-M3100-M.html This eliminates the linkage behind the seat tube, giving you more clearance. It mounts via a normal band clamp. Versions are also available for E-type and direct mounts. Some of Shimano’s pics:


6

The option I took in the end worked really rather well - I upgraded the front tyre from 2.1" to 2.25" (Nobby Nic) and kept the back at 2.1" with considerably more tread (Rapid Rob) for trail centre and winter use. Handling on mud and wet roots/rocks is much improved (at the expense of heavier going on road, but I can refit the WTB Nanos for ...


6

An 11-speed chain will mesh with and be driven by a ring designated 8-speed without issue, barring corner case exceptions. (There's nothing necessarily stopping manufacturers from cheating or being sloppy with keeping everything that's nominally 3/32 cross-compatible even with parts of disparate eras/types as in this example, but it's not an issue one sees ...


6

Sounds like you have a bit too much cable tension in your new configuration. Usually cable tension is tuned with the barrel adjuster you mentioned, but if you cannot get the tension low enough with it, you'll need to loosen the bolt that attaches the cable to the derailleur, give the cable just a bit more slack and try again.


6

'E type' is a front derailleur attachment standard. Some frames provide an E type mounting point directly, some require a 'back plate' that provides the mount point that is clamped by the bb cup. As far as I can tell, some back plates are clamped by the cup and have no other provision to prevent rotation. There is not very much fore or aft force on the ...


6

This adds a small amount of detail to Andrew's answer. I generally stay in the big ring on my road bike (52-36). If I wanted to be in the big ring and the top two cogs, the chain would start rubbing the derailer cage. I would shift to the high trim position to ameliorate this. The exact cog where the chain starts rubbing the derailer cage may differ on your ...


6

There's more to front derailleur adjustment than limit screws and cable tension. Both the angle of the derailleur and the height need to be set properly. The angle of the derailleur being off can cause chain rub against the cage. If the rear of the cage is angled too far outward, the chain can rub against the inside of the cage when the chain is on the ...


5

Front derailleur is not a particularly important component to optimise, in my opinion, since it only touches the chain when being operated (assuming it is correctly set up so the chain doesn't rub). I doubt Shimano sells any derailleurs that don't "do the job" of shifting gears, so at worst the shifting in the front will be a bit worse and the components ...


5

with a bigger chainring you may simply need to install the front mech higher up the seat tube.. The outer part of the 'cage', if correctly positioned should be just a couple of millimetres above the biggest chainring when you change up.. Not sure this answers your question but i hope so...!


5

The front derailleur doesn't care what the rear derailleur is and vice versa. The front derailleur is matched with the front chainring sizes, number of chainrings, mounting type of the front derailleur (a property of the frame) and the front shifter. The rear derailleur is matched to the shifter (for indexing; the shifter is matched to the cassette), and ...


5

According to Shimano front derailleur specs here all road triple front derailleurs support max 50 tooth and have 20 tooth capacity (max difference between largest and smallest rings). The general consensus on this site is that Shimano is quite conservative in it's specifications so overstepping the max chainring and capacity by 2 teeth will probably work ...


5

Not according to the Shimano compatibility documents. Tiagra 4500 series appeared about 2006 and 105 5700 series appeared about 2010 so we need to look at the 2010-2011 archived compatibility document from here and search for 'FD-4503'. The charts say it is only compatible with Tiagra 4503 and Sora 3400 9 speed triple shifters. To confirm we can search for ...


5

Did you replace the housing as well? It sounds like the derailleur is working fine and the problem is somewhere in between the shifter and the derailleur in the housing. To fully diagnose the problem, you'll need to start at the shifter and work through each section. First test just the shifter, disconnect the cable and remove the cable from the housing. ...


5

Ben, congratulations on your new bike! Yes the behavior is normal. The large cog should have a similar setting, i.e. if you don't shift all the way to the small ring, but just click gently, it should move into an intermediate position as well. This is called "trimming" and is important to allow the chain to access all rear cogs without scratching on the ...


5

Depending on the issue and excess length you might bend the cable out of the way, you might shorten it, or you might release and reattach it. In this case the cable could be released and pulled down more, behind the clamping plate there is a little groove that the cable is not currently sitting in, see the extract below from the dealer's manual for R3000 ...


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