29

Although I support keeping older bikes in circulation in general, this particular bike comes with some caveats. One of my riding buddies had a very similar bike. The Vitus 979 is a bonded aluminum frame with small-diameter tubes. It was notoriously flexible when new. It was rumored that Sean Kelly, who raced on one of these, had to replace his fork after ...


19

Depends what is your goal, but personally, I'd go for the modern one. Maybe for this budget, you can find something second hand with Shimano 105, that would be also an option. The reasons are: weight is a secondary concern, unless you are in competition and are looking for 1/10th of seconds (and other parameters are similar). The weight that matters is the ...


13

Yes - after that mileage you will need both a new chain and new cassette. A new chain on the old cassette will not mesh right, and accelerate wear on the new chain. Depending how much chain elongation has accrued, you may need new chainrings too. They wear slower because more teeth are engaged in the chain. Look at the chainring and see if the scallops are ...


13

The most likely causes are cable friction and derailleur hanger misalignment. Indexing adjustment has gotten more sensitive to both as the speed count has increased. Derailleur hanger misalignment will tend to reduce the margin for error in the adjustment, and make it hard to avoid certain gears where there's some jumping or noise. When it's aligned, the ...


12

There is no good way. One could imagine ways of contriving a low-end claw-type derailleur on. Don't do that. Nexus hubs are usually reliable. In some places in the world, there are lot running around without issue. That you've had chronic issues suggests either damage, defect, or a setup issue. Some number of Nexus and Alfine bikes have made it into the ...


11

I'll weigh in as the single person in this thread who actually seems to have ridden, and owned, multiple Vituses. I love them, always have, mainly for their history, their gorgeous looks, their light weight. I ride my current one in blue daily, as a city bike, have for several years. As a relatively inexpensive mid-range frame, it handles nimbly, and the ...


11

Yea, the QR will hold it on tighter then the screws could ever dream of. If you ever need to remove the wheel though, be extra careful as the one remaining screw has a higher risk of breaking when it doesn’t have a second screw to share the load. The load is from the derailleur’s weight, chain tension, and the wiggling you might need in order to remove the ...


9

It looks to me like at the moment you stop the crank, the chain goes slack at the 'bottom' (normally the top) between the cassette and the chainring. The chain keeps on moving in the normal direction even though you stopped the crank. This effectively shortens the chain by pulling it through the derailleur, causing the derailleur to rapidly/violently take up ...


9

Your shift cables need to be replaced, like NOW. This is a very possible symptom of deteriorating cables (as in, starting to fray and eventually snap), which makes sense considering 10 and 11s brifters have a reputation for eating shift cables. Juhist has a good answer explaining the mechanism and reasoning. 30Mm is a lot of riding and the cables are well ...


8

The other posters are probably right. But, if you haven't money to burn, I would replace the chain first and see how it goes. You say you keep it clean and well lubed so damage to the front chainrings are less likely and unless you seldom change gear, the cassette may be good enough to last another chain. Have a look at the teeth to see if they look like ...


8

If I were buying a vintage frame (and assuming that it fits), I would generally be more inclined to buy a steel one. I'm not a vintage expert, but the Vitus 979 appears to be an early aluminum frame. In theory, aluminum has a finite fatigue life, whereas steel, titanium, and carbon do not (assuming equal quality control on the materials and frame ...


7

I think you will need a claw hanger adapter. The old derailleur has one that appears to be non-removable, and the new one has a 10mm bolt that expects to find a matching hole in the frame, which yours won't have. You probably want something that looks like this: There is a sunrace branded one, but it looks the same in the critical dimensions as a generic ...


6

There's more to front derailleur adjustment than limit screws and cable tension. Both the angle of the derailleur and the height need to be set properly. The angle of the derailleur being off can cause chain rub against the cage. If the rear of the cage is angled too far outward, the chain can rub against the inside of the cage when the chain is on the ...


6

I've never tried them, but some suppliers such as Wheels offer an emergency hanger which is held in place by the clamping of the quick release. while such a solution may allow you to attach any modern derailleur to your bike, it would not be easy to live with, as removing and reinstalling the rear wheel would become an ordeal. Also, the shifting on many ...


5

The time to replace a chain is when it needs replacing, not at some predetermined interval. Take it to the bike shop and have them use their chain stretch tool. From the symptoms you describe, you probably need a new one. I have never replaced a chain at 2,000 miles, and in younger days, I was I was doing 10,000 miles a year on pretty expensive equipment ...


5

I think you've described best practice for a couple of reasons. Firstly, cables will not tighten themselves, only slacken, so you provide the greatest adjustment to the bike owner; they have the full thread of the adjuster to use. Secondly, the only adjustment the owner can make in the first instance is to tighten the cable. The uninitiated rider can't ...


5

Are you trying to bring the derailleur farther outwards? If so, you need to add cable tension. Screwing out the H limit screw won’t help if there isn’t enough tension to get to the limit anyways. To check for chainring problems, derail the chain from the chainrings entirely and give the cranks a spin. If you see the chainrings wiggle side to side, then you ...


5

After hours of thinking it was indexing, I slowed down and watched the chain only to learn that it was a single stiff link in the chain. Thanks to @Warren Burton who helped me get there.


5

The main problem with a chain that is too short, is when you're in a combination of gears where the chain is too short to go around both chainring and cog. You'd have to be moving the chain from a lower to a higher-tooth count gear, so at some point in that first half-revolution, the chain will bind, the cranks will resist you, and any more force on the ...


5

Having a chain that's slightly too long or slightly too short may also worsen the quality of shifting. A chain that's too short will pull the jockey wheels a bit further away from the cog. The drivetrain manufacturer presumably designed their derailleurs with a certain optimal distance. The issue is how quickly shifting degrades as you move slightly away ...


5

tl;dr it's the plastic disc between the spokes and cassette. Best fix is to just remove it. As Swifty said, the problem is that the freewheel isn't running properly free, i.e. the cassette keeps turning with the wheel even though the chainwheels aren't pulling. This has happened to bikes of mine for two different reasons in the past: A really old, badly ...


5

The community generally seems to advocate against upgrading your bike. I'm not sure why, it often makes alot more sense than buying new and more than buying used much of the time. If your bike was originally equipped with Shimano 600 the likelyhood is that it's a good quality frame with other good components so it's probably worth upgrading if you love it. ...


5

To answer one minor unaddressed points: it's not your shifting that caused one of the screws to back out. Several of the sites I've Googled, such as this one, say that vibration is a common cause of bolts backing out like yours did. Bikes obviously experience vibration. However, most of our bolts stay put. I would guess that for whatever reason, the bolt in ...


4

A common observation is that Shimano sets conservative limits to capacities of its derailleur products. Many people, including myself, run bigger than allowed cassettes with no problems. Additionally, there are aftermarket adapters available that are designed to help exceed the nominal capacity of certain road and MTB derailleurs. Is that a common thing ...


4

Unlikely to cause any problems. A long cage R7000 (Shadow type) is rated for 28-34t cassettes. The short cage is rated for 25-30t, so going from 32t to 30t or 28t would be fine. Expect to need to make normal adjustments for the new cassette, but it should work fine. Of course it depends which precise RD you have, and since you didn't say I can't be 100% ...


4

most likely yes because a worn down chain could wear down a cassette hold the brake down and try move the crank if the chain is climbing up the teeth on the cassette you need a new chain and new cassette maybe even the chainring


4

Any 8 speed derailleur should work fine - the higher the "grade" the better made they are. However the incremental difference is slight, and simply "not mashed" could be all you need as long as it performed satisfactorilly beforehand. Another way to view it is that the same part has a cost of $x, and a fancier unit has cost $y, but you ...


4

Every internal gear hub (IGH) comes with its own shifting equipment. They are not designed to be interchangeable. Good IGH all come with a turning grip shifter nowadays, and their indexing is pretty clear. If the cable length is adjusted correctly (they have a screw for this), it's quite a worry free experience. However, IGHs are not designed to be combined ...


4

Sheldon Brown's website has a table that lists cable pull data for most modern IGH shifters. What this data won't tell you absolutely is where the tolerances lay for slightly different cable pull among shifters still being able to work. Sturmey 3-speed shifters are known to work with SRAM/Sachs hubs, and there's a modern trigger-style Sturmey 3-speed shifter ...


3

No, Microshift is usually compatible with Shimano (As far as I know, all except Advent 9 speed), but Shimano 8 speed is not compatible with Shimano 11 speed as the derailleurs have different pull ratios.


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