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2

There are a few things that could be at issue: Lower limit screw might need to be opened up. You could try opening it all the way up, and then experiment with tightening it just to the point where you have shifting problems, then back it out slightly. Of course, that won't help if it's not the cause. Crud in the cable housing might be preventing the cable ...


7

As Nathan and Weiwen point out - it is possible for the limit screws to drift over time. They have offered great solutions for preventing the drift. Is it common? Not in my experience. I've seen it happen but what usually happens is the derailleur gets banged around while parking the bike or in a crash shifting its position relative to the cluster or chain ...


14

They absolutely can vibrate loose. Derailleurs vary in how good they are at resisting it. Ones with no plastic retention element and where the screws turn with almost no resistance are the worst about it, which includes many old ones as well as some very low-end ones. Many old derailleurs have also used springs under each screw shoulder to prevent loosening. ...


5

I suspect that it would be very unusual for a limit screw to drift. It is true that if bolts loosen, vibration is one possible cause, and bicycles are inevitably subject to vibrations unless they're track bikes (but if they are, then they have many fewer screws and bolts). Nevertheless, I have only had one limit screw (the B-tension screw on a Shimano R8000 ...


2

You should only need to adjust the limit screws if the derailleur can’t move to the highest or lowest position because it runs into the limit screws. In your case the barrel adjuster for cable tension should be all you need. If you can’t get shifting up and down to work properly it’s usually because you have too much cable friction. This could be due to ...


3

Presuming this combination of shifter/cable/cassette/rear mech used to work fine together, then something has changed. I'd start by lifting the bike, and make sure you can actuate the rear mech by pulling on some exposed inner wire while slowly hand-pedalling. You might need an assistant, a workstand, or some cord to suspend the bike a little. The symptoms ...


2

Also, financially it may be cheaper to replace the rear wheel rather than rebuilding your existing (steel?) rim onto a suitable hub. Then realising that you got a 622 mm wheel when it might have been 630 mm, so you need new tyres. And it looks odd with a 630 front wheel+tyre so that needs replacing as well. Now the brake arms won't reach the rims, so you ...


4

A crank like that is easy to turn into a 1x because 110bcd 1x rings are readily available. You will need a new bottom bracket and the one you have is probably asymmetrical. The easy way of making a modern off the shelf BB work with an asymmetrical crank is use a 73mm one even though your shell will be 68mm, and use 4mm of spacer under the drive side cup (2.5 ...


1

8 speed chain works just fine with the jockey wheels on the 10 speed edition of the 105 RD. On my 20" 1x folding bike, I tried 7 speed freewheel (14-28T) and also 7 speed cassette (11-28T). I replaced the 44T crankset w. a 46T. The first 46T crankset i got, did not fit an 8 speed chain at all. I use an HG40 chain w. 102L and a 10 spd 105 ss rear ...


1

I came across one combination that allows a 700% range, within reasonable specs deviations of commercially available parts: 36/26 chainrings and a 9/46 cassette (detailed in this question) — it could work in either 11 or 12 speed. But it's not what I did in practice: the implication of such combination would require to use components that only exist from one ...


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