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1

I'm currently running a RD-M3000 (which seem to match the specs of the RD-M3100) with a 11-42 cassette 9-speed (Advent). The original cassette was a 11/36. So a few comments about this experience: no goatlink necessary to make it work, you have to adjust the B-screw, which means putting the derailleur cage further away from the cassette. Gear changes are ...


4

Any 8 speed derailleur should work fine - the higher the "grade" the better made they are. However the incremental difference is slight, and simply "not mashed" could be all you need as long as it performed satisfactorilly beforehand. Another way to view it is that the same part has a cost of $x, and a fancier unit has cost $y, but you ...


2

The question you should be asking is: does a 9 speed cassette work with your shifter? I think it's quite rare to find non-freehub rear hubs for 9 speed systems. Thus, I suspect you may have a 7 speed (or less) system. These systems have shifters with less positions than 9, and besides the cassette sprocket spacing is different, so no, your shifter most ...


5

tl;dr it's the plastic disc between the spokes and cassette. Best fix is to just remove it. As Swifty said, the problem is that the freewheel isn't running properly free, i.e. the cassette keeps turning with the wheel even though the chainwheels aren't pulling. This has happened to bikes of mine for two different reasons in the past: A really old, badly ...


9

It looks to me like at the moment you stop the crank, the chain goes slack at the 'bottom' (normally the top) between the cassette and the chainring. The chain keeps on moving in the normal direction even though you stopped the crank. This effectively shortens the chain by pulling it through the derailleur, causing the derailleur to rapidly/violently take up ...


1

This sounds like the classic case of inner cable tension is wrong. If you can see bare wire down beside the downtube, try tugging that with your hand and see the rear derailleur move. Set the shifter to what should be the "easiest/slowest" gear, which is probably the highest number. Then with the rear wheel off the ground, hald-pedal your cranks ...


1

Friction shifters are infinitely adjustable - by definition they don't have stops or detents for each gear position. If they did, they'd be called "indexed" So there are only three attributes your friction shifters need to run effectively Total range - the lever must be able to pull enough cable to actuate the mechanism across the whole cassette. ...


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