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This doesn’t explain my problem - my rear cluster (vintage bike, dished rear wheel) turns freely. When I backpedal, the chain comes off my chainring at it's bottom. A slack chain at the top is irrelevant, and it doesn’t look slack anyway. Apart from new chains and rear cogs on the cluster (cassette in modern speak), the only thing I have changed in 50 years ...


1

The 7700 is higher quality when new than a new Claris derailleur . In particular jockey wheels are sealed bearing and more durable than those on cheap r/ds sold today. http://www.disraeligears.co.uk/Site/Shimano_Dura-Ace_derailleur_7700_GS.html A new rd might be better than a worn out old one with worn out jockey wheels (which you can replace), but ...


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7700 was a 9-speed groupset. at that time, the cable-pull ratio was standardized, such that any 6- to 9-speed shifter, including your Claris, should work perfectly. If your shifting is only "so-so," I might look for alternative explanations. so, as far as performance is concerned, they should both work equally well. it's hard to even say what would ...


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Yes, you can use the Shimano 9 speed MTB derailleur with the 9 speed Ultegra 6500 shifters. This is because on older MTB groups up to 9 speed and road groups up to 10 speed Shimano used the same actuation ratio (ratio of length of cable pulled to cage movement). The total capacity of the derailleur is a measure of how much chain slack it can handle and ...


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All nine speed Shimano shifters index with all pre-ten-speed Shimano MTB derailleurs. All nine speed long cage MTB derailleurs with long (SGS) cages will have total capacity sufficient to run any cassette they can clear with a double in front. 36t large cog cassettes came out late in 9-speed mountain's life. Only a very few Shimano 9 MTB derailleurs are ...


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You already got great answers here is some other good reading. http://blog.artscyclery.com/science-behind-the-magic/science-behind-the-magic-drivetrain-compatibility/


1

Shimano 8 speed derailleurs and Shimano 8 speed shifters are always compatible. So yes, you can use the 8 speed M310 shifter with your 8 speed derailleur.


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One can take a long, L shaped Allen key, placing a flat side on the flat aspect of the large chainwheel's teeth. Use the top, right side of the chainwheel and have the long part of the key facing back toward the front der. Rotate the chainwheel/Allen key back so the Allen key's long part will move across the flat, forward aspect of the derailleur's outer ...


1

Cost aside, a carbon framebuilder or repairer could likely figure out a good way of doing it. If tire clearance considerations allow, a simple way would be removing the existing hanger and building up the needed area to 31.8 or 34.9, then doing a hanger adapter. (If by some chance it's both a round tube and a standard diameter, you might not even need to ...


4

It depends on the derailleur. Most or perhaps all Shimano FDs intend to have you use the top forward part of the outside cage as your reference surface. Where the logo is. Their published procedures show this. This is especially true of the knuckle type road models of the last few years. SRAM Yaw FDs have you use the marked lines down the center of the cage ...


0

Various instructions of front derailers with clamp want me to ensure that the derailer cage is parallel to the chainrings. What is the preferred way to do this? Visually, by eyesight. Don't worry though if you don't get it perfectly straight. A front derailleur in my touring bike is visibly unaligned. The plates are not parallel to chainrings. I clearly see ...


1

I'd initially suspect improper cable routing as other answers have stated. By the way, there is no such thing as adjusting the cable tension. The only tension on the cable comes from the derailleur spring and the cable does not stretch. The cable length relative to the housing is what matters as that affects the derailleur indexing. See https://www.parktool....


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If you feel confident you've eliminated cable friction, incorrect routing, limit screws, and the b-tension screw as possibilities, that leaves hanger alignment, poor clutch function, and physical damage to the derailleur as possible contributing factors. Looks aside, putting an alignment tool on the hanger would ideally be the first step. Contemporary ...


1

It sounds like the cable is not routed correctly, putting force on the cable where it was not intended and thus adding more friction than normal. This would explain why the cable moves freely when there is no tension on it, and why it gets harder when you shift to bigger cogs. Run down the cable from the shifter to the derailleur to see if the routing is ...


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