20

There are devices that allow a bicycle to be modified to make it easier and safer to ride with one arm. Riding safely would come with practice and confidence. Trikes or recumbents mentioned in the comments offer a safe alternative also. The key modification needed for a bike is a steering damper. The damper adds resistance to steering by way of a spring ...


12

Generally speaking your off hand should be the front brake, so if you're right handed the front brake should be the left. They can be set up either way, though, especially if you're using cable-driven (non-hydraulic) brakes. Even with hydraulics you should have no problem making the right hand brake the rear. I would highly advise this, as in a panic ...


12

I would probably try a simple Roadster (or as I know them a "Dutch bike" or „Hollandrad“): internal gear hub with back-pedaling/coaster brake (ex. Shimano's 8 speed Nexus) normal brake leaver for the front stable geometry You will have to train to use the back brake, and try out a few "emergency" stops somewhere safe. These bikes aren't built to be fast ...


8

I like to share my solution for modifying the brakes on a bike for riders who were born with one hand/arm or are amputees. I was born missing four fingers on my left hand. For many years I was running two brake leavers on the right side. Even though it worked, I always found this solution somewhat inelegant from an engineering point of view. I recently got ...


8

I’ve been riding with one arm for about twenty five years without problems. I have had many bikes (mainly old bikes with the front brake removed) and a few electric bikes again with no problem. I stay on the road. My current bike is a Felt Cruiser with back-pedal rear brake, normal front brake, and twist gears. Luxury! My biggest problem is hand ...


6

I was amazed the right is the front but found this Australian Standard AS1927 – 1998 Pedal Bicycles – Safety Requirements, page 16 Section 2.14 Braking System 2.14.2.1 states the following: Handbrake lever location: The brake lever for a front brake shall be positioned on the right-hand side of the handlebar, and that for a rear brake on the ...


6

I cycle with one hand. I’ve got hydraulic brakes, and I’ve put a hydraulic splitter inline. It takes both brakes in & a single line out & then into a single Juicy brake controller. The splitter came from a quad bike setup. I don’t find any problem with bias, nor any problems with not having enough brake fluid to shift both callipers. For gears I ...


6

So I don't know much about the disease you mentioned - but if the symptoms are caused by the strain on the wrists and hands, then I have a perfect but expensive solution: Switch to a recumbent. There is no weight on the hands, ever, on all recumbent types. Under seat steering handlebars allow the hands to rest next to the torso in a very relaxed fashion and ...


6

Disabled cyclists are cyclists and so they would like some control over steering, braking, or pedaling. It's tough to design a strong singlewheeled adult-sized pedaled trailer because of the weight involved (50-200kg; 100-400lb) with adult riders. That's a lot of stress on the hinge-joint that connects the trailer as well as the front rider if the rear ...


5

This sounds like a really bad idea. Training wheels limit your ability to lean into a turn. If you're going fast enough to balance without the training wheels, you're going fast enough that you need to turn by leaning. So you would need training wheels that retract when you get above ~5 mph, and deploy below that speed. Apparently something like this does ...


5

I ride with one arm / hand exclusively, and am very mechanically-inclined, and have taken a lot of time to figure out successfully how to solve this problem, and can now rip fast downhills no problem: You need to make your handlebar position stable, without two hands stabilizing the bar. You do this by: Long stem. Mountain = 140mm+. Road = 120mm+. I did ...


5

Indicated in the comments and indicated in an answer, but not really covered yet. A recumbent trike or bike. The biggest difference is that on recumbent bikes and trikes your sitting position is such that you do not need to take any of the weight of your body and almost or completely non of the breaking force on your arms. Many recumbent bikes and trikes ...


4

If the OP, is saying they have an injury, this could take a year so to heal, but there are plenty of adaptions to reduce load or stress. As others have posted, moving both brakes over, and running a single ring upfront, one gear shifter will all help. Then you can adjust the seat height, stack on the stem and stem angle so not so much weight over the bars, ...


4

You should have a look at this: http://www.notbroken.co.uk/ The Founder ( Tom Wheeler ) had a massive crash while riding downhill and can't use his right hand properly. He adapted his bikes and with the help of 3D Printing he is now making his own stuff to be able to ride again. I think you can shoot him a mail and see if he is able to help with some tips ...


4

They definitely exist for bicycles. I work for a distributor that stocks them, they are referred to as adult stabilizers. They only thing i'm not sure of is how compatible they are with recumbents. One other thing to consider would be a recumbent trike or a tadpole trike which is just a recumbent with 3 wheels rather than two. I realize a new ride can be ...


4

If you are using clipless pedals, then mid-sole cleat positioning is sometimes recommended to triathletes specifically to reduce load on the calves (eg). I haven't used it myself, but it might be worth a look. Here is another question discussing mid-foot cleat positioning (with no super clear consensus)


3

You can also opt for the 3 wheels cycle (or tricycles). Being made on purpose I think they can be more sturdy than added wheels.


3

I'd recommend hitting up a local bike shop for recumbent bike options. Since product availability is pretty location specific, only this general advice is helpful. Even recommending a particular website may not be helpful depending on your country of residence. Regarding handle bars: your entire position on your bike is going to have changed in the 10 ...


3

Some bicycle geometries are more stable than others, for example they can be ridden hands-free. Stability is related to wheelbase and something called the mechanical trail. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_and_motorcycle_geometry Maybe bicycle that is stable enough for hands-free riding would be beneficial in your situation. You can easily try out a ...


3

First off, it's totally possible to ride using just your one arm. There is a cyclist who actually rides while missing part of one of his arms. Oh yeah and he only has one leg! It's a pretty neat story. Cycling over the Pyrenees with one leg So while it's a tough situation to be in, I think you may have to learn to ride with the limited mobility you have in ...


3

If I understood your question, you may want to look into internally geared hubs, it seems they are exactly what you are looking for. I thought they were fairly popular, so I would be surprised if you really have not come across these - so I am sorry if I missed the point. A landmark feature of gear hubs is that you can change gear while stationary - it ...


2

I just came across a letter to Lennard Zinn in Velonews about a Paralympic cyclist who was using a drop bar bike. He had both hands and arms, but his right hand lacked the strength to brake or shift. I'm merely summarizing the responses below. However, all the responses rely on either electronic shifting, on hydraulic brakes (albeit cable-actuated ones), or ...


2

If you can try a ride on a crank-forward bike, it might ease your leg aches. Notice the geometry is quite "chair" rather than bike. Downside is they will be poor at going up a steep hill. Or consider an electric bike to help take the edge off when your legs do start to ache. This is more of an assist rather than a replacement power source.


2

Halfway between Nate and Dutch's answers, you can buy a trike conversion kit. I've never used one, so can't comment on their effectiveness. Note the unit bolts to the rear chainstays and replaces the rear wheel completely. You end up with a wide axle in the same place as your rear wheel, but this kit has a stub chain so it probably only has one driven ...


1

Shimano's new GRX line include "sub-levers" that seem to fit your needs. They are meant to be mounted on the tops of drop bars near the stem and run along the same hydraulic line as your main hydraulic lever/shifter. The product ID I believe you need would be BL-RX812-R (or -L if the left was desired) https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/grx-11-...


1

Not exactly what you are after, but a set of clip on aero bars would provide basic control with the forearms for changing road position and gentle curves. Although depending on flexibility it might not be possible to find a comfortable position.


1

For setting off on Recumbent bikes, you can use your hand on the floor to hold yourself up. May I confirm you're changing gears and setting off in a low gear, working your way up through said gears? If not, that could seriously inhibit your setting off; The faster you accelerate, typically, the more stable your set-off. With recumbent bikes, I highly doubt ...


1

Depending on the degree/level of ability, you might benefit more from a design like this. Seatbelt/harness will hold the passenger in place. This image shows a wheelchair-like front seat, but I've also seen one that had a big cushy armchair front seat intended for the elderly - I believe it was Dutch and used to give rest-home residents an outing, who were ...


1

What about using motorbike hydraulic levers for brake or clutch, which deliver a greater volume of fluid and could therefore have enough volume for two brake systems, without running out of travel? Could be combined with different diameter brake discs for balance OR 4x cylinder front and 2x cylinder brake units (like Magura units) for balanced braking. ...


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