6

I've seen recipes for decontaminating brake pads floated around but the easiest and safest thing to do is simply replace them.


6

The disc rotor size is 160mm as engraved on the rotor (160mm is a common size rotor). The mount type for the disc brake calliper is Post Mount (which should be 74 mm spacing between the mounts, center-to-center), which is the most common standard for mountain bikes. You can purchase a single Post Mount calliper and matching lever, separately or as a set. My ...


5

First thing to do is loosen the quick release and make sure the wheel axles are seated all the way in the dropouts. If the left axle was not all the way in it would pull the top of the wheel to the left. If the wheel is in the dropouts properly I have to conclude the wheel is built incorrectly, with the rim offset to the left. The hub does not seem shifted ...


3

Wash them with a toothbrush and about a 1/4 cup of rubbing alcohol for a set of pads. After a few minutes brushing with alcohol, pat them dry with a clean towel. I then use a butane torch to heat them up pretty good. Oil and other contaminates burn away. Generally I stop burning the pads when they stop putting off smoke. Allow them to cool and after, ...


2

You have not lost the bearing. Bearings are pressed into hubs and don't come out easily. What you see in the middle of the brake rotor is the bearing - you can see the black plastic dust seal. What has gone missing is the hub end cap. Many wheels have replaceable end caps that allow conversion between through axle and quick release forks or frames. Finding a ...


2

They did indeed turn out to be M7 (1 mm pitch). Nuts are fairly easy to get, but at least the locknuts (half nuts) I bought take an 11 mm spanner. None of my multitools, or any I can find online, have this size spanner built in; even my workshop spanner set omits it, but in over 20 years of building and maintaining hardware for work and play, this is ...


2

Ugh! Bicycle disc brakes are not without their weaknesses. The frequent attention and adjustment they require due to noise or pad rub is particularly irksome to me, closely followed by the system's ridiculous intolerance to pad contamination (really? That sort of flaw considering the environment they're to be used in?), the recommended "fix" ...


2

The brakes should be adjusted. The disc caliper mounting bolts allow a small amount of adjustment to center the pads between the disc rotor. Your caliper is likely misaligned allowing the rotor to rub on the pads. If the rubbing sound is cyclic meaning it rubs then stop at the same place each wheel rotation the cause is more likely a warped rotor. Another ...


1

With disc brake systems, a couple of maintenance tasks need to be done somewhat often. Realignment of the pads with the rotor and trueing of the rotor itself are fairly straight forward, easy tasks accomplished with common tools. Park Tool's website has a good explanation with video of the adjustment of hydraulic disc brakes. Before adjusting anything ...


1

Should one adjust the caliper on top of the bracket? Or should one adjust the bracket on the fork? For Magura parts, you'll adjust the caliper. It's impossible to predict what would be the case for every brake assembly that will ever be manufactured, so your question about the future cannot be answered with certainty. But if you ever see an intermediate ...


1

Far be it from me to discourage anyone from buying a new bike, but you might find that changing just the saddle and tires on your bike, and maybe getting a fitting, will be all you need to make it more comfortable. And putting in longer rides so you get acclimated.


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