15

In order to fit a disc brake, you need a compatible fork and a compatible wheel, plus a compatible brake lever. Your fork does have a disc brake mounting already designed in, it is an International Standard (I.S.) mount. Most mtb brakes now are Post Mount fittings so are fitted using a simple adapter. You can see the differences here or search around images....


12

On most cable disc brake systems there's a moving pad and a fixed pad. The moving pad presses against the rotor and bends it slightly towards the fixed pad. The rotor is made of rather springy steel, and is probably where the feeling you experience comes from. The barrel adjuster only addresses wear to the moving pad, but the fixed pad also wears in use. ...


11

The main reason is the 2020 Specialized Shiv provided by their sponsor is only produced in a disc version. You can see an article about the bike here: https://www.bikeradar.com/news/specialized-sworks-shiv-tt-disc/


10

There are two reasons why this happens with cable disc brakes. The first is that the pads wear, and since cable systems are not self adjusting, you need to tighten the cable to bring the worn pads back closer to the disc. Secondly, cables stretch over time, which again requires you to tighten the screw to take the slack out. If you've reached the point ...


10

In all honesty, you can use any disc you like, and from practically any manufacturer as long as the dia. (and fitment type) is the same.


10

A few years ago this was a reasonably common setup as sold. I've certainly ridden an e-bike set up that way, with v-brakes at the back and a mechanical disc brake at the front. I suspect this wasn't so much about stopping power as not needing maintenance between services, though in practice some adjustment was required even if less than at the back.


10

The magic of lobes allows Torx to handle a given torque value with a shorter bolt head than the alternatives, and some frame/fork designs need the clearance in this area. That's the only reason for it. Some secondary bolt retention designs won't work with just any bolts, ie Shimano.


9

Adjusting the pads is a normal part of maintenance for mechanical disc bikes. I have a tektro mechanical e-Bike that is ridden with rider+cargo > 200lbs 8 mi/day with 4 steep (> 50 meter elevation change exceeding 20% grade) hills. I move the adjuster for the moving pad in one "click" weekly when filling tires and readjust the static pad monthly. I ...


8

It sounds like air is trapped in the system and you should do a rebleed. Just start over, follow the manufacturer instructions carefully, take your time and be very careful to get ALL of the bubbles out. I don't see any evidence that anything is wrong with the brake or the rotor or anything else. Yeah, new pads do need to be bedded in, but when you say the ...


8

Sounds like you are adjusting the position of the wheel axle in the frame drop outs to move the rotor relative to the caliper. Your weight and the forces generated going over bumps will push the axle fully into the dropouts, that's why you are getting rub after every ride. The calipers have an adjustment mechanism and that's how you should adjust the ...


8

The standard hub width for road wheels with QR is 130mm for non disc and 135mm for disc hubs. Even though you can force the frame to clamp around narrower hub, it is strongly recommended to add spacers to the axle to adjust the width. As mentioned in comments, if you have hydraulic brake it's best to insert a spacer between brake pads so that you do not ...


7

As long as the skewer is set with sufficient clamping force this QR disc brake setup should work fine and from a practical standpoint there will be very little functional difference between this setup and a thru-axle. If the QR is not sufficiently tight (i.e., you didn't set it with enough clamping force), you may notice a small shift in the axle position ...


7

Two possibilities - the wheel itself have shifted, unlikely with a though axle though. The crash does not seem to have be bad enough for a major damage like deformed hub to damaged carbon fork (Carbon is far tougher than many people make out and tends to fail catastrophically). However, if you have concerns over the fork, get it checked by a bike shop. ...


7

The rubber seals in mineral oil levers and calipers are very easily damaged by using the wrong fluid, and should this occur replacement seals aren't typically available. Experimenting with alternative or in-a-pinch brake fluids is a bad idea for this reason. The results are unpredictable. In the worst case, a brake failure could occur. Running a different ...


7

The side with the disc is dished in more than the other (that is, the spoke flange is closer to the hub's centerline), so yes, I would expect it to have higher tension.


6

Background For most of cycling history, we've actuated derailleurs and brakes by pulling cables. One of the possible disadvantages of cables in general is that as the cable housing exerts a bit of drag on the cable as you pull it through. Also, housing can get contaminated with dirt. You could ameliorate the latter problem with full-length housing, as is ...


6

Many mechanical cable-actuated disc brake calipers do indeed move only a single pad when the cable is pulled. I believe Shimano mechanical disc brakes use this design. Unlike rim brakes the disc pads can be adjusted to run very close to the rotor, so the active pad does not have to move very far to pinch the rotor against the static pad. Hydraulic brakes ...


6

Assuming you have hydraulic disc brakes, the most obvious explanation is that you have a brake fluid leak in the front caliper. If the grease isn't appearing anywhere else it must be coming from the caliper itself. Shimano uses mineral oil as hydraulic fluid which will feel greasy, the black color is road dirt sticking to the oil. You can probably prove ...


5

Rotors are wear items and therefore must be removable. The Cube website does not specify what rotors are fitted, but I strongly suspect they are Shimano Center-lock which have a steel rotor riveted to an alloy ‘spider’. They are fixed to the hub with a central lock ring. Changing the rotor will not improve braking performance, unless you are thinking of ...


5

Most of the time, a bike wheel spins around the axle. When braking, the axle suddenly wants to spin around the point where the brake caliper is grabbing. The traditional orientation for a fork dropout, with the opening a little forward of straight down, is such that on a rim brake, these forces pull the axle stubs up into the dropout, and no movement can ...


5

If you are keeping the same 26" wheel, the important dimensions are crown to axle height and rake. Aim of the exercise is to keep the head set close to the same height from the ground as it is now, without affecting trail. Rake affects trail which affects handling, so with a different rake you could get a bike that handles differently, in the extreme, ...


5

You should get rid of the pads and buy new ones. You can clean the disc with cleaning alcohol or brake cleaner. Just be sure to also clean all holes from the inside as there might be some oil left. Afterwards bed in the new brake pads and you are good to go.


5

You need a +40mm post to post adapter. The Magura one is their part number QM42. Usually these kinds of adapters interchange between brands, but just getting the Magura one plus a Magura or Shimano 203mm rotor should set you up.


5

To do this "properly" you need to replace all these parts: a new frame with disk caliper mounts a new fork with disk caliper mounts all the brake system parts, being calipers and rotors, hose etc. new wheel hubs front and rear with disk rotor mounts longer replacement spokes for your front wheel to rebuild it with a cross lacing pattern It is possible you ...


5

You can put 12 speed on any of the freehub body types found on mountain bikes (HG, XD, or Micro Spline), but if you want to use a 10t small cog you can't use HG. The spacing from the rotor mount surface to the dropout is standard, but the tolerance is big enough to make this the spot where alternate wheelsets can be tricky to make work with no adjustment. ...


4

Metallic would be better as you are suffering brake fade. Advantages any other type are far outweighed by avoiding brake fade. If you have the option when you replace the pads, look for ones with a heat sink if they are available for your calipers. Suggest you should look at your riding style, and especially see if you can pump the brakes rather than drag ...


4

The real problem with quick release skewers on a disc brake bike is that all skewers are not created equally, and some cheaper skewers distributed on QR disc brake bikes were not up for the task (hence recalls). If you are using rim brakes basically any functional skewer will work, however as pointed out in the linked posts skewers on a disk brake front ...


4

If you want to stick with Shimano, the line-up charts for the GRX groups suggest an SM-RT64, SM-RT70 and RT-MT800 for use with RX400 and RX600 and RX810 groups respectively. None of those discs have the 'bladed' look of the SM-RT800 rotor.


4

In general I've found tektro brakes to need a lot of tweaking (V as well as mechanical disc). With discs this can be minimised by getting the fixed pad as close as you can without it dragging. If your rotor is bent this won't be as close as it should be Sintered pads are definitely better for loads+hills; it's important to bed them in but they don't glaze. ...


4

I ran this setup for a while on a Kona Stuff. In fact, it came like that from the Factory as I had the fork upgrade option to Fox32 with hydraulic disc, but the rear was still V-Brake. It was fine.


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