New answers tagged

2

Manufacturers usually prescribe the maximum allowable wear, resp. the minimum allowable thickness, of the pad. That includes some safety margin and you can indeed go much farther, but at your own risk. One of the pages that summarize these limits is https://bikeco.com/mtb-brake-pad-wear-limits/ Shimano allows to go to 0.5 mm of the pad thickness. Again, some ...


6

There's still plenty of life in them. Pads are worn when there's so little material that the pad spreading spring can start to touch the brake rotor.


3

My tourer sometimes thinks it's a gravel bike - I take it off-road quite a lot in some horribly muddy conditions, and in water up to the hubs (the latter not deliberately). That's got (road) BB5s with 160mm discs, and they have plenty of stopping power in all conditions when adjusted well and with sintered pads* that aren't too worn. If you look at BB7s, ...


0

*Shifted from the follow-up post: Are road mechanical disc brakes safe to pair with a steel gravel bike Disclaimer: It's not unsafe in my experience but I am unsure how safe this setup is, so perform this at your own risk. Some manufacturers advise against this for certain brake models (i.e. TRP's hybrid hydraulics/mechnaical brake - some content creator on ...


7

Cable pull is probably incorrect with Brifter and MTB brakes - covered In this question. The brifters (you don't state the make/model) are normally road cable pull (short pull), but you can get long pull brifters. MTB discs are long pull, about twice the cable pull is required to activate the brakes. Matching MTB caliper to short pull road levers means you ...


1

My first thought is that you were pairing road levers with mountain brakes. If the levers pull relatively little cable, but the brakes are designed for a lot of cable travel, you'll have bad results, as Michael mentioned. However, it's also possible that you've just got bad brakes (you don't say what they are). If the force you put into the brake levers is ...


1

I will assume that they're compatible, i.e. that the brake calipers are a road model. Pad choice is not part of the equation in determining bite point or lever travel. Its influence on power is primarily under sustained heavy braking, and since more aggressive pads have downsides in terms of noise and rotor wear, you should usually only go to them when you ...


1

Edit: Per your other question you have Microshift Advent X STI style shifters. I assume it’s the ADVENT X Drop Bar Shifters 1x10 SB-M100A. You also mention Tektro MD-C510 disc brake calipers. Both brifters and calipers have the usual road brake cable pull. So it can’t be an incompatibility. On the internet one can read a lot of complaints about the Tektro ...


-1

Ive experience similar issue when testing ou my mates bike multiple times on different bikes, honestly I still don't know much about why its there, but when I change to another different rotor is noise is completely gone, so I believe the orientation could be wrong before. Dont worry about stuff is loose I literally tested myself to make my brake rotor and ...


5

I am going to assume you're talking about a stripped post mount. As others have said, don't ride even a little with only one bolt. That risks overloading the remaining bolt and causing a brake failure and/or additional damage to the parts. In some instances they can get stripped because someone put in too short of a bolt. If it's only a matter of a ...


4

You do not have two bolts for safety (i.e. if one fails, you have another one). You have two (or more) bolts because each one is fundamental. When one is gone, the brake will not function properly and soon also the other bolt(s) will strip/break. Stop riding that fork.


7

Regardless of whats wrong - a brake is a critical component of your bike and you should not take risks. If your brakes are malfunctioning, stop riding the bike until its fixed. Don't be tempted to take the brake off and ride anyway, that's foolish. The common fix for a stripped thread is to install a thread insert, often called a "helicoil" But ...


1

I would start with the QR skewers and dropouts as it's the easiest to fix. I personally had this problem whenever I apply huge force on the pedal (e.g. standing up pedaling) and thought it was the BB but it turned out to be paint flaking off the dropout. Greasing them helped quietened the bike. Also check your chain ring and make sure those bolts are torqued ...


1

I had the same problem. I ended up putting washers at each inner side of the rear wheel skewer and making them really tight because there was movement when going uphill and applying pressure to the rear wheel. Problem fixed!


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