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1

My wife had an relatively early mountain bike (2006 maybe), entry level, Merida Juliet I think, 26 inch wheels, Aluminum frame, 3x6, v-brakes (no disc mounts), hardtail. I have upgraded it to SRAM NX Eagle 1x10, and I think 11-42 rear cassette. For the goods: It is 1x. No chain grinding against rear or front derailleur due to not being in the best choice of ...


3

I have done that a couple of tines and the bikes are currently in a very enjoyable state, at least, for me, that is, no more upgrades are needed, until something breaks. My main tactic is to keep an eye on prices of parts from both, reputable web pages and reputable local stores, and buy when the price is right. Sometimes you can get slightly used parts for ...


3

I say go for it. A cheap bike, making sure it has modern dimensions, such as a threadless 1 1/8" steerer, can be a good place to start. Inexpensive bikes with pretty universal disc-brake mounts abound. The only real downside is that cheap bike parts tend to be fiddly and need constant adjustment. There is one big jumping-off point though: don't spend ...


1

Are there limitations on the extent to which a cheap bike can be upgraded? The only limit on the extent to which a cheap bike can be upgraded is money. With a little or no planning and an unlimited budget you can swap parts, and then eventually the frame, and then more parts until you have a bike that is worth half, or less, than the amount you spent to get ...


5

I'd consider the "investing in the bike" as misplaced. You're investing in your own fitness, your mechanical competence and knowledge, as well as indirectly by growing your own tool collection. The bike itself is a means to an end, and some of it is consumable parts to use up and replace again. If you can source acceptable used bikes then that ...


8

If you want to go that way, you need to define "where you want to go" in terms of upgrades and choose a used bike that is compatible with these standards. Some research will also be needed to make sure that the components that you plan to buy can be reused in the future bike. For example: wheels (or hubs to be more accurate) that you find on older ...


3

Some economics: A good frame costs around ~500-600 EUR. True, you can spend as much as you like because carbon fiber frames are available today but you don't need to. At that price point, there are plenty of good deals available. A good bike built from parts (including the frame) costs around ~1500-2000 EUR depending on the level of equippedness you want to ...


15

You’ll always be limited by the frame. And buying a cheap bike just to upgrade it is usually not cost effective. The frame will always be heavy and bad. It will dictate what kind of headset (-> fork, stem), seatpost, wheels and brakes you can install. On old or cheap frames a quill stem and 126mm dropout spacing are still common which severely limits your ...


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