29

As an confident road rider I'd do two major things. I'd turn my head, look backward and make eye contact with the driver(s) just behind me to show intention, and maybe signal at this point. Or I might not signal at all. Then take the lane. You will be moving fast enough to slot-in with the cars because of the downhill. I'd avoid being sidelined on the ...


16

Firstly, congrats on both posting for the first time and for deciding to commute on a bike! Many of us commute on bikes in the UK and everyone started somewhere! If you're not 100% confident with ANY part of your journey, you should just stop, walk the challenging bit, and then get on your bike again to continue. There is absolutely no shame in doing that, ...


15

By this do you mean pedalling when unnecessary (and without increasing the bike's speed), for example, on descents? I will do this on long descents just to keep my legs turning over and to prevent them getting too cold. But I will mix it with coasting. There is a theory that keeping the legs moving will keep your blood flowing and help pump lactic acid ...


14

The heavier person will present more area to the wind, but this is mitigated by two factors: The bicycle presents a fixed area to the wind and the area presented by the heavier person is not proportional because of the 2/3 power law. If you just scale up a rider by a factor in mass, the volume increases in proportion, but the frontal area scales up as the 2/...


14

when I pressed the rear brake lever, the wheel stopped turning immediately, despite the slight pressure if it locked up with only slight pressure, either your brakes lack modulation, or it had really poor traction. The first (modulation) is generally adjustable. The second depends on your tyres, the road surface, possibly oil/petrol/diesel spills, loose ...


12

The differences are quite significant from race to race - each track is different. Also events such as Rampage are not too much about speed. The top speed may vary between 55-65km/h on tracks such as Mount Sainte Anne up to around 80km/h in Pietermaritzburg which is known for high speeds achieved. Of course all assuming good weather. Also these speeds are ...


12

The main thing you have to consider at speed is drag: The force F on you+bike (mass m) is: F = ma = mg sin Q - F_d - F_rr where a is your acceleration, g is the acceleration due to gravity and Q is the hill angle to the horizontal. F_d is the drag force which doesn't scale with mass. Try dropping a balloon and a (soccer) football of the same size and you'...


12

Focusing on the strava bit - its a screwed up strava track. The track shows they flew, and strava's point-grabbing routines have gone wonky. Short answer they did not do it in 11 seconds. They are bike rides though - just a fortuitous error on the GPS signal makes it look like they were faster, and much more direct. I suspect there's some obstructions in ...


10

Having done both, I'd say they are about equally dangerous with the edge going to downhill biking. It's easier to gain momentum on a downhill bike and harder to properly lose it. Additionally equipment failure is a bigger concern and generally more catastrophic. Downhill biking in the winter pads the ground (like skiing) but, during all seasons, trees ...


10

I've literally never braked one handed so it kind of terrifies me. It is terrific for a reason and you have to practice somewhere safe. If you hold the front set with only one hand and do brake, your body momentum will try to turn the front wheel. If you don't counter this movement, you'll fall or get where you don't intend to.


9

In addition to the response provided by PeteH, I use "soft pedaling" when coasting to a stop on my downtube shifter/derailleur-equipped road bike in order to change gears before a stop. Some bikes (such as those with internal hubs) do not need any chain motion to shift gears, but my bike does. That's the only concrete reason why I would employ this ...


9

Brakes work by turning kinetic energy into heat through friction. As you heat up the system there generally is less capacity to absorb more heat (in addition to physical changes in the brake system component). Constantly dragging your brakes is probably the worst strategy. Tandem bikes do this but they typically have one braking system dedicated to being ...


8

A lower saddle will compromise your riding comfort at all other times. Instead you should have unweighted the saddle and put your backside further backwards to weight the rear wheel. Also, were you braking on the straight only? Or were you braking into the turn? In the dry we can get away with a lot of bad behaviours like braking while turning, that ...


8

As a cyclist in the UK your use of the bicycle on the road is governed by the Highway Code. You are not required to use hand signals, because it is acknowledged both hands are required for operating the bike safely. In the event you cannot use hand signals, make other road users aware of your intention through eye contact, body position on the bike, road ...


7

A neck brace limits range of motion to protect the neck and spine BikeProducts A neck brace restricts any extreme movement of your neck during a crash. In other words, it prevents your head from tilting too far forward, backward, or to the side, all of which can damage the spinal cord. A spinal cord injury can, at best, keep you off the bike for ...


7

You don't allow downhill skiing. Downhill on same terrain bike versus ski. You ski on snow. It is white and smooth. If it is not ice it is even soft. You bicycle on dirt and rock. Go down at 20 mph not even close. Bike has less rolling resistance so you gain speed faster. Bike has brakes and have to turn to stop on skis but I still say ski ...


7

The maximum safe speed is the speed where you still have control you think is needed. There are levels of control Can you stop if a car suddenly reverses out of a driveway? This is the highest level of control; it means we'd never exceed about 25kph (16mph) on the flat. Obviously we frequently exceed that, and so we're trusting that such intrusions into ...


7

This answer will be for riding down hills fast, but a lot of the advice applies to slower speed descents. When riding downhill you should have your hands in the drops, the pedals at level (i.e., one foot forward, one back) and depending on your flexibility you want to get your butt back and bring your head down close to the stem so you don't present your ...


7

If you are doing this to get a better Enduro and a Better DH bike, I believe this is a really bad idea. If you are doing it because its fun and you want to play and learn about bike building, dive on in, but be prepared fro less than stunning results at higher than expected prices. Given the manufacturers are fully aware most people have an S ( refer ...


7

Yes and no. What really matters for handling of the bike is that the fork you use has the same axle to crown length and the same offset as the fork the bike should have. The offset is the distance between the front axle and the steering axis The axle to crown is the length between the center of the hub axle and the crown of the fork. There's lots of ...


7

Do a 2 stage turn manoeuvre. or I do this often when traffic is too important.


6

Downhill mountain bike has the potential for very serious injury, that must be said right out of the gate. You can do terrible things to yourself. I've ridden downhill for 15 years on and off, just recreationally, and I've had a few scrapes along the way: separated AC joint in shoulder hyper extended elbow deep flesh wounds requiring stitches in legs (...


6

Whenever I go somewhere new on my bike, I like to check Strava's Global Heatmap. You can easily see the routes that are most common and if you drag the little yellow fella down onto a road you can see what the road is like too. This is most useful for finding nice roads that a lot of people ride, for major climbs, look for a segment marked HC in the ...


6

Since post mount became the norm, most long travel/gravity forks have a minimum rotor size based on what post mount length standard they're built with. Here is how Fox communicates it on the product page for their 40 series forks for example: So putting the caliper directly on the post without any adapter sets it up for a 203, and the fork can't take ...


5

A lot depends on what you mean by "trail/downhill" and by "work". It wasn't that long ago that a full squish 100mm fork bike was a full on downhill machine. However, the big drawback to that bike as a descender is the relatively steep head angles. Putting a bigger fork will help with that, but it won't help with the issue of how robust the parts are ...


5

Looking at the component specs, its an entry level MTB, one better than a BSO. 80% of mountain biking is about the rider and his skills, not the bike. Shops won't tell you this, as telling you your riding skills matter most does not end in a sale of a newer season/more expensive bike. Cashed up middle aged execs won't either - many just want you to see ...


5

There is no easy and free solution for this, since your bike is not meant to be going downhill. The best thing you can do is go downhill using the largest front chainring and a pretty large rear cog (but not the largest). This will ensure a pretty good rear derailleur tension which will most probably prevent the chain fall. If you are willing to spend ...


5

It's really simple, gravity/weight moves you forward, and drag/friction keeps you from going fast. He can't do much about the weight difference, short of drinking more beer or getting a heavier bike. But drag and friction is a different story. There are many things slowing you and your buddy down, the largest factor being wind resistance. Wind resistance ...


5

According to UCI's official regulations Section 1.3.031 (emphasis mine) Wearing a rigid safety helmet shall be mandatory during competitions and training sessions in the following disciplines: track, mountain bike, cyclo-cross, trials and BMX, para-cycling, as well as during cycling for all events. During competitions on the road, a rigid ...


5

If it is harder to get up the hill it has to be easier to get down. Assume you are two rocks of same shape and density dropped from mile up. What the is the relative terminal velocity? Two forces at work that are equal at terminal velocity gravity = c1 * r^3 wind resistance = c2 * r^2 gravity / wind resistance = c3 * r velocity1 / velocity2 = r1 / ...


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