39

What harm could it possibly do? The cranks are held firmly in place by the bottom bracket; the back wheel is held firmly in place in the drop-outs. The chain is completely non-structural: all it does is transmit power from the pedals to the rear wheel. The only issues I can think of are make sure you know how to remove and replace it, obviously; I pretty ...


34

I have been using paraffin wax this year on my "fast" road bike as a bit of an experiment. This was using the hot wax approach, where paraffin wax was melted (in a slow cooker) and a clean chain dipped in the hot wax. Pros Very clean drive train, even after 2000 km the cassette and rings sparkle. Straight paraffin (i.e., without bees wax) does not ...


27

In theory - none because the motor has a freewheeling clutch that is completely disconnected when it is not providing assistance. That is when you're travelling over 25 km/h (location-dependent) or have not engaged the assistance. However you're dragging around a heavier frame, with a motor and wiring, and maybe the battery pack too. All this extra mass ...


22

First things first: A belt is probably slightly less efficient than a properly installed clean chain. The test you link already indicates that. Probably with the tension Gates requires you'll loose a bit more power. On to your question: The chain is 200 grams heavier than the belt, of course with the chain you get gears, which you don't get with a belt ...


19

In my experience - breakage is not directly correlated to wear. I've had bikes with unknown mileage on them, and have chosen to ride the transmission into the ground. Generally the performance slowly deteriorates, with chain slip under power being a sign that things are getting bad. Unlike other answerers, I've never had a worn transmission break and strand ...


18

I own & ride an XDS COM10 2014 bike. This is fitted with a Sussex (Taiwan) shaft drive transmission & Shimano Nexus 8 speed hub gear. I have used it regularly for over a year & travelled about 4000km on it without any issues . It works perfectly, smooth & quiet.I thought it was very reasonably priced at about AUD700 brand new on-line. It is ...


17

They are there to help facilitate shifting. Basically, the ramps you see help when going from a smaller to larger sprocket by catching the side plates of the chain to help the chain be pulled up onto the larger cog. Another place where you will see atypical teeth is in the front; some are shorter/different shaped than others to help shifting as well. ...


16

You can normally use chains from other legitimate vendors, be it SRAM or KMC or something else. You do not need to use Shimano™® chains only. But no-one can tell you whether your chain is of sufficient quality. Only you can inspect it, measure it and try it. We cannot do that. I am not even 100% convinced it is actually a fake chain, but I will just take is ...


15

I had a MTB that had a quad chainring. The bike was a Raleigh Delmara and it was equipped with a friction shifter. Photo is dated 2017, but it was ancient at that time, probably late 90's steel MTB From memory it provided no more range than a triple, because the difference in tooth count betwen chain rings was not as much. That is, it was more like a ...


14

A lot of people are now out of the habit of doing chain cleaning beyond wipe down level. The reason to clean thoroughly is a marginal improvement in wear life and performance. But the key word is marginal. What you get for the effort is below the threshold of what many would consider worthwhile, especially riding recreationally. Note that the expense level ...


14

Gear ratio range. If you decrease the chainring sizes you decrease the highest ratios available. It's not possible to make the gap between the chainrings much bigger and get decent front shifting so the large ring has to shrink with the small one. It's easier for manufacturers to make a wide ratio cassette that retains an 11 tooth sprocket and shifts ...


14

Despite the "hell will freeze over" warnings (it doesn't) it is worth considering why you ride a bike, and why you ride an 11- or 12-speed bike when a 9 speed will do the job just fine before going too deeply into the cost vs performance tradeoffs of when to change the chain. You are clearly aware the that shifting performance will deteriorate once ...


13

The main problem is quality, in terms of dimensions and variance. If you think its an 11 speed chain but someone has just repackaged some 10 speed chain, then there will be issues. Likewise, if it were the right chain but didn't pass Quality Control and was rejected because it didn't match the required dimensions, then it could fail quicker, or accelerate ...


12

The derailleur needs to guide the chain into the sprocket - which means it goes on the bottom. The tension pulley needs to go on the slack side of the chain - which again means it goes on the bottom (the top side of the chain loop has the drive tension). If the drive train was reversed, you could do it. Put the drive wheel in front and steer with your butt ...


12

The derailleur is there to act as chain tensioner. In a frame intended for derailleur the rear wheel can't be moved to tighten the chain, so a separate spring-loaded chain tensioner is needed. The cheapest and ugliest way is to just use whatever derailleur was on the bike before conversion.


12

Cable replacements, chain, tubes, all those are "consumables" Even spoke replacement is not an uncommon problem to have periodically. A bike isn't a cellphone to be discarded when its a bit tired - periodic maintenance is easy. Consider that if you were using a car, there would be oil/filter changes and fuel, perhaps a light bulb every couple years and a ...


12

You mostly answered your own question: the racing market drives the industry, sometimes to the detriment of the availability of real-world gearing. A major compounding factor is that there are a lot of hoops a person has to jump through to get smaller rings on their road bike, starting with buying new, weird, mostly old or retro cranks. Making things work ...


12

There is a limit to the amount of tension a given chain should be put under. Smaller chainrings increase that force - the pedal arm and chainring form a lever, and the smaller the chainring (and longer the pedal arm) the more force will be applied to the chain given a fixed force on the pedal. What you might be gaining in terms of chainring and cassette ...


11

They will work fine together- same if you swap the brands around. I've done this many times for myself and for others with no issue and it's common practice amongst bike shops. This is strictly marketing & legal covering of their own asses. If you look at Wippermann Connex Link compatibility they say that the one link is compatible with SRAM, Shimano, ...


11

I don't think I've ridden that particular brand but I have ridden a couple (one flex, the other rigid). My experience was that on one bike especially I could feel the shaft wind up under power, which made me reluctant to apply full power (breaking someone's expensive shaft drive bike is a bad idea). The Dutch article covers the main problems. To recap: ...


11

I think this is quite a broad question, so I'll highlight a few parts of the bike: Seatposts/saddles: Probably interchangable Forks: You wouldn't want to swap them, and chances are a beefy mountain fork wouldn't go into a road frame anyway, even if you could get the right headset. Gearing: Road bikes typically have higher gearing than mountain bikes ...


11

Upgrading an older bike is typically not economical. Parts are typically not cheaper. Parts are not as available. That drivetrain is not compatible with a modern bike. Bikes have gotten better. Little faster, lighter, more comfortable, and easier to service. You can find decent to nice newer model used bikes for $400. Find someone that bought an $800 ...


11

If you don't have a chain and don't have a chainguard, you're almost guaranteed to slip at some point and dig your chainring into your shins or ankles. It's very painful -- both at the moment as well as later when trying to get the grease and grime out of the puncture wounds... If you do decide to take off the chain, you might consider wrapping a very ...


11

No sorry, this is not practical. Freewheels mostly stopped at 7 speed, and 8 speed was rare because of excess unsupported axle causing bent axles due to leverage. Your suggested plan would require fitting 8 speed shifters and an 8 speed rear mech. That's too much faffing about when you want to swap wheels. Instead, you could find an 11 speed hub with the ...


11

Many two wheel drive mountain bikes exist. Here's one article advertising a new one: There’s been no shortage of attempts to build a workable two wheel drive bicycle over the years, but this latest effort from Double of Japan looks like one of the most compelling yet. https://www.bikeradar.com/news/this-is-a-two-wheel-drive-bike-done-right-sort-of/ They do ...


11

The answer by Criggie excellently explains that the motor doesn't add any pedaling resistance. I find the claim true especially on by Bosch Active Line Plus system -- I have never observed any pedaling resistance above 25 km/h. However, there's a bit of extra weight. Around 5 kilograms to be precise. If riding at 23 km/h average speed on varying terrain ...


10

The only study I know of concluded that cross chaining in relatively modern 9spd gear systems at the angles typical of bicycles had no measurable effect on the efficiency of the gearing system. Even back in the bad old days of 52/42 with five cogs in the back, I never worried about cross chaining. Use the gears you like and replace the chain when it starts ...


10

I have a shaft drive bike. I have ridden in Australia about 7,000 kilometres (4500 miles) and so far no problems. I recently serviced Shimano 8 speed hub & inspected geartrain, all are in good shape, run smoothly. I like the bike, its a BMW without engine.


10

This would never work due to fact that no force would be transmitted to the rear wheel until the derailleur cage was at maximum extension. The derailleur has to be below the chainstay to allow it to take up the slack in the chain. I suppose you could split the derailleur into to parts, one to keep the chain tension and the other to change gears, but that ...


10

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


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