39

What harm could it possibly do? The cranks are held firmly in place by the bottom bracket; the back wheel is held firmly in place in the drop-outs. The chain is completely non-structural: all it does is transmit power from the pedals to the rear wheel. The only issues I can think of are make sure you know how to remove and replace it, obviously; I pretty ...


21

First things first: A belt is probably slightly less efficient than a properly installed clean chain. The test you link already indicates that. Probably with the tension Gates requires you'll loose a bit more power. On to your question: The chain is 200 grams heavier than the belt, of course with the chain you get gears, which you don't get with a belt ...


21

I have been using paraffin wax this year on my "fast" road bike as a bit of an experiment. This was using the hot wax approach, where paraffin wax was melted (in a slow cooker) and a clean chain dipped in the hot wax. Pros Very clean drive train, even after 2000 km the cassette and rings sparkle. Straight paraffin (i.e., without bees wax) does not attract ...


18

I own & ride an XDS COM10 2014 bike. This is fitted with a Sussex (Taiwan) shaft drive transmission & Shimano Nexus 8 speed hub gear. I have used it regularly for over a year & travelled about 4000km on it without any issues . It works perfectly, smooth & quiet.I thought it was very reasonably priced at about AUD700 brand new on-line. It is ...


17

The excess oil collects grit from the road, which acts as an abrasive that will wear out the chain.


17

They are there to help facilitate shifting. Basically, the ramps you see help when going from a smaller to larger sprocket by catching the side plates of the chain to help the chain be pulled up onto the larger cog. Another place where you will see atypical teeth is in the front; some are shorter/different shaped than others to help shifting as well. ...


15

http://www.landriderbikes.com They were very heavily advertised several years ago but currently they seem to show up more on craigslist than on TV.


15

1x9 setups are more common on a mountain bike or commuter bike setup with rapidfire shifters than a drop bar setup. However, due to a lack of front derailleur they can have chain jump issues due to the effect of the rear derailleur on the chainline. This has to be compensated for, often with a chain guard on the outer side and jump stop on the inner side of ...


14

A lot of people are now out of the habit of doing chain cleaning beyond wipe down level. The reason to clean thoroughly is a marginal improvement in wear life and performance. But the key word is marginal. What you get for the effort is below the threshold of what many would consider worthwhile, especially riding recreationally. Note that the expense level ...


14

Gear ratio range. If you decrease the chainring sizes you decrease the highest ratios available. It's not possible to make the gap between the chainrings much bigger and get decent front shifting so the large ring has to shrink with the small one. It's easier for manufacturers to make a wide ratio cassette that retains an 11 tooth sprocket and shifts ...


13

Since it only happens when you stand I would say it is definitely a combination of a worn chain and worn chainring, and nothing to do with shifters or derailleurs. As a chain wears, it 'stretches', meaning the distance between the pins in the chain grows. This is a result of the side plates wearing into the pin. Once the chain starts to 'stretch', it starts ...


12

I have ridden one - it used weights thrown out by centrifugal force and springs to move the derailleur in and out. Horrible is all I can say. Maybe it was me not being used to it, but things like not being in the gear you left it in, and less than smooth changes - which you have not idea when they are going to happen, especially under power. The only ...


12

Rain, hail, and snow don't hurt a chain. Salt makes it rust, and dirt wears it out. Salt: You won't get all the salt out without removing the chain from the bike. The chain is doomed. You can, however, easily delay this till spring with regular application of wet chain lube. A bit of rust won't hurt if you ride regularly. Dirt: Given that the chain only ...


12

The derailleur needs to guide the chain into the sprocket - which means it goes on the bottom. The tension pulley needs to go on the slack side of the chain - which again means it goes on the bottom (the top side of the chain loop has the drive tension). If the drive train was reversed, you could do it. Put the drive wheel in front and steer with your butt ...


12

The derailleur is there to act as chain tensioner. In a frame intended for derailleur the rear wheel can't be moved to tighten the chain, so a separate spring-loaded chain tensioner is needed. The cheapest and ugliest way is to just use whatever derailleur was on the bike before conversion.


12

Cable replacements, chain, tubes, all those are "consumables" Even spoke replacement is not an uncommon problem to have periodically. A bike isn't a cellphone to be discarded when its a bit tired - periodic maintenance is easy. Consider that if you were using a car, there would be oil/filter changes and fuel, perhaps a light bulb every couple years and a ...


11

Trek had a bicycle a few years ago named "Lime" which had 3 speed automatic gearing. I don't think it sold well. It used a gearing system called "Coasting" that was created by Shimano and actually controlled by a computer chip from signals from the front hub. "A dynamo is fitted on the front hub that gauges the revolutions of the wheel. It sends this ...


11

I don't think I've ridden that particular brand but I have ridden a couple (one flex, the other rigid). My experience was that on one bike especially I could feel the shaft wind up under power, which made me reluctant to apply full power (breaking someone's expensive shaft drive bike is a bad idea). The Dutch article covers the main problems. To recap: ...


11

Upgrading an older bike is typically not economical. Parts are typically not cheaper. Parts are not as available. That drivetrain is not compatible with a modern bike. Bikes have gotten better. Little faster, lighter, more comfortable, and easier to service. You can find decent to nice newer model used bikes for $400. Find someone that bought an $800 ...


11

If you don't have a chain and don't have a chainguard, you're almost guaranteed to slip at some point and dig your chainring into your shins or ankles. It's very painful -- both at the moment as well as later when trying to get the grease and grime out of the puncture wounds... If you do decide to take off the chain, you might consider wrapping a very ...


11

You mostly answered your own question: the racing market drives the industry, sometimes to the detriment of the availability of real-world gearing. A major compounding factor is that there are a lot of hoops a person has to jump through to get smaller rings on their road bike, starting with buying new, weird, mostly old or retro cranks. Making things work ...


10

It's much better to open the chain. Derailleurs are not really designed to be opened repeatedly, and doing so inexpertly can potentially ruin the derailleur. Chains might have either a lock link or a master link of some kind, find that open the chain and then thread the chain through the derailleur. If the chain does not have one of these links, you will ...


10

I have a shaft drive bike. I have ridden in Australia about 7,000 kilometres (4500 miles) and so far no problems. I recently serviced Shimano 8 speed hub & inspected geartrain, all are in good shape, run smoothly. I like the bike, its a BMW without engine.


10

This would never work due to fact that no force would be transmitted to the rear wheel until the derailleur cage was at maximum extension. The derailleur has to be below the chainstay to allow it to take up the slack in the chain. I suppose you could split the derailleur into to parts, one to keep the chain tension and the other to change gears, but that ...


10

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


10

Interesting question. Real world conditions are messy with multiple factors impacting any analysis, as such my answer will be speculative, but based on a number of sensible working assumptions. Chainring degradation as a source First lets consider how much material comes off a chainring. Generally speaking, if you replace your chain regularly before it ...


10

There is a limit to the amount of tension a given chain should be put under. Smaller chainrings increase that force - the pedal arm and chainring form a lever, and the smaller the chainring (and longer the pedal arm) the more force will be applied to the chain given a fixed force on the pedal. What you might be gaining in terms of chainring and cassette ...


9

I drive the same Rohloff for over 8 years and do not see an end of its lifetime. I cannot speak for other brands, but in all posts above the free-of-charge service by Rohloff, as part of their special corporate culture was not mentioned. Up to now, whenever there was a problem, the thing was being send to Rohloff and I had to pay nothing. That being said, ...


9

The simple answer is yes, you can just change the crankset without replacing the entire drive train however there are other considerations. Depends on if your changing rings out or replacing the set and cranks. Other considerations if doing a full replacement are: Chain line When selecting a new crank set you need to ensure it aligns with the current ...


9

They will work fine together- same if you swap the brands around. I've done this many times for myself and for others with no issue and it's common practice amongst bike shops. This is strictly marketing & legal covering of their own asses. If you look at Wippermann Connex Link compatibility they say that the one link is compatible with SRAM, Shimano, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible