14

Gear ratio range. If you decrease the chainring sizes you decrease the highest ratios available. It's not possible to make the gap between the chainrings much bigger and get decent front shifting so the large ring has to shrink with the small one. It's easier for manufacturers to make a wide ratio cassette that retains an 11 tooth sprocket and shifts ...


12

Cable replacements, chain, tubes, all those are "consumables" Even spoke replacement is not an uncommon problem to have periodically. A bike isn't a cellphone to be discarded when its a bit tired - periodic maintenance is easy. Consider that if you were using a car, there would be oil/filter changes and fuel, perhaps a light bulb every couple years and a ...


11

You mostly answered your own question: the racing market drives the industry, sometimes to the detriment of the availability of real-world gearing. A major compounding factor is that there are a lot of hoops a person has to jump through to get smaller rings on their road bike, starting with buying new, weird, mostly old or retro cranks. Making things work ...


11

There is a limit to the amount of tension a given chain should be put under. Smaller chainrings increase that force - the pedal arm and chainring form a lever, and the smaller the chainring (and longer the pedal arm) the more force will be applied to the chain given a fixed force on the pedal. What you might be gaining in terms of chainring and cassette ...


11

No sorry, this is not practical. Freewheels mostly stopped at 7 speed, and 8 speed was rare because of excess unsupported axle causing bent axles due to leverage. Your suggested plan would require fitting 8 speed shifters and an 8 speed rear mech. That's too much faffing about when you want to swap wheels. Instead, you could find an 11 speed hub with the ...


8

Can I do minimum upgrade to get my bike to fit 11 speed cassette? Nope. You'd need derailleurs, crank set, shifters, cassette and chain at least. Given that groupsets bought as separate components cost a lot more than they do as part of a complete bike, I almost always recommend buying a whole new bike to make this upgrade. Can I downgrade my trainer ...


8

Each greater "speed generation" of chain is narrower than the last, which is measured in the length of the pins. If you run a wider chain than matches the cassette, it will tend to ride up on the shifting ramps and be otherwise impossible to adjust cleanly.


6

Traditionally you would need a split in the rear triangle to fit a belt drive. There is a company named Veer that offers a split belt for with supporting sprockets for several internal hubs such as Rohloff and Shimano Alfine. https://www.veercycle.com/collections/all/products/split-belt-pro With a belt drive you will need an internal hub or go single speed....


6

There's a huge disadvantage for a Dahon and any other small-wheeled derailer bike, which is that the cage is gong to be unfortunately close to the ground no matter what you do, and having a longer cage than necessary makes the problem worse. Shorter cages also manage chain slap better and are lighter.


5

Generally no, for the simple reason that unlike chains belts are continuous and can't be split, so belt drive bikes need a split chain or seat stay, or a removable dropout. If you had a single speed or internally geared hub chain drive bike with a removable dropout, at a minimum the rear sprocket, chainring and chain would have to be replaced.


5

Answering the Question Is there any objective study on the effectiveness of drivetrain cleaning? The short answer is that I have not seen or done any objective studies specifically addressing the pros and cons of cleaning a bicycle drivetrain. All of the bicycle chain studies I have seen involved clean chains. There are two examples linked at the ...


5

To answer the 'is it cost effective?' question you have to know what you are getting for the upgrades. Are replacement components going to be lighter, more efficient or more durable? You could say that if you can't feel the difference then there is no point in upgrading a component. However, if you enjoy the process of upgrading your bike, and the upgrades ...


5

This is called chain suck. One possible reason is worn chainrings. In the question it is mentioned that the rings were used with worn out chain. This wears out chainrings quickly.


5

Nope, not compatible, no way to make it work. The reason is that as the number of sprockets on the rear hub went up, the sprocket spacing and sprocket thickness got narrower, and the chain external width also got narrower. An 11 speed shifter will not be able to index properly on an 8 speed freewheel. Additionally the 11 speed chain will not shift properly ...


4

The answer to the chain/drive train cleaning frequency question is pretty ambiguous. Allow your good sense to prevail as there is a fine line between meticulous and a psychiatric diagnosis. I ride daily using either mountain bike or roadie and in all weather conditions except ice or snow >6 inches. I use TriFlow (just a fact, not a product endorsement) to ...


4

If you have the short cage version of the latest RD–R3000 Sora rear derailleur the largest (official) sprocket size is 32 teeth. The medium cage version supports up to 34 teeth. If your current chain is shortened correctly it will probably be too short for a ≥32 teeth sprocket. Theoretically you could still use the chain and avoid the large–large gear ...


4

To figure out what cassette and ring size to get, the best approach is to use a gearing calculator to play with the options in comparison to what you need or would like based on your experience with bike's current gearing and how it's working for you where you ride. With 1x conversions the usual question is how much high end you can accept losing to get the ...


4

As you have a 1x drivetrain with non-integrated brakes and shifters upgrading it to one with more gears is relatively simple. You need to replace the shifter, rear derailleur and cassette and chain at a minimum. You can also replace the crankset and bottom bracket. As you have an 8 speed cassette the freehub body will take up to an 10 speed cassette with no ...


4

Yes. In addition to the points Nathan makes about 10/11 speed compatibility, a new chain should really be installed with a new cassette in any case.


3

Will the Ultegra cassette work with the Praxis chainrings? This is not quite the right question. The rings have to be compatible with a 10 speed chain that you'll be using on a 10 speed drivetrain. The Praxis web page for Buzz chainrings is unhelpful but other pages I found said that they are compatible with 11 and 10 speed systems. Presumably you are ...


3

The general answer is no. There are a number of standards that have emerged in the industry that mean different manufacturers products can be used in the same drivetrain. Chain pitch and inner width are standardized so chains are generally interchangeable, but need to be of the correct external width to match the number of sprockets in the cassette of ...


3

They do not officially support it. Even on the long cage version the maximum supported sprocket size is 42t. https://www.microshift.com/en/product/rd-m6195l/


3

The problem is not clearance between the crank arms and frame. You need to look at the clearance between the chainrings and frame, which is likely to be much tighter. You also need to consider chainline - how for the nominal centers of the chainrings and sprocket cluster are from the centerline of the frame. You will be moving your cranks 6.5mm inboard, ...


3

I found the culprit(most likely): it was the cogs digging into the freehub body, as seen in the post here. I imagine the cassette lockring wasn't tight enough. The recommended torque is 50Nm but since I don't have a torque wrench that big, I've tightened it how tight I believed was enough, last time I removed the cassette. At the time of removing the ...


3

I used to work on a fleet of cyclists' bikes who used their bikes as part of their full-time job, where it was usually raining and dirty. I changed a lot of drivetrains and oiled a lot of chains over the years. That said, I don't have any kind of empirical data to say that doing x will make your chain last y% longer. But I can speak generally about the ...


3

As you no doubt know, the cage length is a significant factor in determining the link capacity of the derailer. But having a longer than necessary cage has several disadvantages. One disadvantage is that a longer cage tends to result in less precise/less "crisp" shifting. Another disadvantage is that the longer cage is easier to damage.


3

For road bikes the subcompact cranks have a bolt circle of 110 mm diameter. The smallest chainring that fits is 34 teeth. There are cranks with smaller bolt circles and small chain rings available, but the selection is limited. Your proposed 42/26 is available in mountain bike cranks, but matching that with road cassettes is a challenge. The chainlines ...


2

This is easy enough, but you'll need some basic hand tools, and either a cassette lockring tool OR a freewheel tool, and probably a chainwhip. Drop the rear wheel from the bike. Clean it (optional but makes everything else easier) Remove the QR skewer or the wheel nut on the drive side. Cogs removal: 4a. Use the special tool to undo the cassette's lockring ...


2

I'm very late but here's my experience with my 26" commuter bike, actually I converted it for summer touring because during the rest of the year I commute with 42 front and 12-25 rear M6000 SGS (designed for 36 max) can work with 42 but you need a longer M5 screw, that's the quickest and cheapest solution, now I'm using 34 single ring front, 11-42 HG500 ...


2

I just converted my 26er from 3x7 to 1x10 (32x11-42) and it works fine with Deore M6000 SGS. Tried both attaching the derailleur with/without an extension, surprisingly it works better without.


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