9

The QR interface is designed such that the axle is fully seated in the dropouts before engaging the QR. The QR engagement should be firm, but it is not designed to hold the wheel in the way you describe. Dangers of trying to do what you suggest are: Severely over-tightening the QR (which you may need to do to keep the wheel in place) could potentially ...


9

They look like you want those "in" the horizontal dropout. The bracket should cover the frame and as you tighten the bolt it will pull the axle further away from the cranks, tightening the chain along with it. Be careful to not over tighten as you want a little 'slack' in the chain. Also, it is very easy to tighten one side more than the other resulting in ...


9

You can do it with files. The chrome does make the surface harder but it's not a big deal. This is usually seen when the fork was originally slotted to take a 5/16" axle. I'm not a Raleigh historian but I'd be a little surprised were that the case on a Grand Prix. It's also possible that it's a fork that fits a 9mm front axle very tightly, and you're ...


7

While it has a rotation prevention value, it's negligible really. The Fuji Gran Fondo introduced this system in ~2012. They have a few of their road bikes use this convertible rear axle system. This system allows riders to swap between a 12mm thru-axle and a 135mm traditional quick release system. That screw specifically has a female part on the inside of ...


7

Short answer: Don't worry about it! Steel is inherently a springy material and you will find the dropouts spring back to their original location once the wheel is removed. In order to permanently re-set the dropout width, you need to bend the steel past its elastic limit. You can look up "cold setting" by Sheldon Brown or whoever you like if you're ...


6

If an aluminum fork dropout has been bent, it has already been compromised in strength. Bending it back will make matters worse. Filing it wider open will also make matters worse, even if it was not already bent: thinner metal can obviously carry less load. I would say don't risk it and find a replacement fork instead. A fork failure when riding can cost ...


6

If the fork is hard to grind, or you value it more and don't want to damage it, maybe you can grind the threads of the axle a little bit, where it meets the dropouts. I've never done this, though. Not sure if entirely safe. But what I've done quite recently was to swap the QR axle for a non-QR one with nuts, on a commuter bike, for anti-theft purposes. It ...


6

It's some combination of: QR springs not pointing the right direction. Try removing them completely while working on this, which can also help with the next thing. Relatively thin steel dropouts not playing nice with this combination of QR skewer and axle ends. If the axle ends are poking through the dropouts and touching the QR nut or cam, or doing so as ...


5

I was able to use a surly tuggnut tensioner with my cross check frame with semi-horizontal, forward facing dropouts. No slipping after that. The end of the tensioner bolt bolt nested in the opening on the rear of the dropout where the long wheel positioner bolt would be installed. It would likely work on most bikes with this style of semi-horizontal ...


5

Sure. Buy an adapter claw like this one (e.g. Sunrace SP550.): The claw screws into the dropout, then you bolt on the derailleur as normal. Alternatively, you can buy a derailleur with an integrated claw like several in the Shimano Tourney line (E.g. the Shimano Tourney RD3105; actually pictured, RD8153): Note that you still have the issue of getting in ...


5

It looks like the front finger of the dropout suffered an impact that pushed it backwards. Compare it to the undamaged dropout to see how much it was moved. Impacts that bend metal tend to mess up the paint. Is there a big mark on the front surface? You could widen the slot by carefully filing away a small amount of material. That is not going to weaken ...


5

The only way I can prevent the wheel from getting lose is to tightening it down so hard that the wheel won't move :) Sounds to me like you have to adjust the bearing play (assuming the rear hub allows you to adjust bearing play). The quick release axle compresses the hub which slightly tightens the bearings. This means the hub should have some play when the ...


5

Check the serrated underside of the acorn nuts; the two surfaces on the QR that press on the outside of the frame. I've seen one where the ridges were smoothed off and didn't bite into the frame, so a good push on the pedal could drag the drive-side forward and make the rear wheel bind on the left chainstay. The first fix would have been a replacement skewer ...


4

Is this what you're looking for? KONA #CMPHCC Derailleur Hanger


4

You've lost the derailleur hanger mounting nut. Don't worry, they're dead cheap. Without it the hanger won't stay in place without the wheel nuts done up tight. You can get away without one (see matt's answer), but it's not ideal. It's better and less fiddly to use a proper mounting nut: The way you've set it up now is totally wrong - the triangle-shaped ...


4

I feel certain that the reason comes down to cost. Quality frame builders surely hold the seat tube, chain stays, seat stays, and the dropouts in a fixture when being welded together. But surely accurate alignment costs money: more expensive machinery, fancier robots, and more skilled workers. And of course frames that fail the dropout alignment test must ...


4

The derailer is sort of the easy part. Your frame could take a claw style derailer like this: Or you get one of these and have a lot more options: 120mm is the minimum rear spacing for derailer multi-speed rear hubs, so you would probably need to spread (bend) the frame. You'll also need a new rear wheel, chain, and freewheel. Your cranks will probably ...


4

The torque that the axle sees relative to the frame can happen in both directions as gears change. For example in the classic Sturmey Archer 3 speed, it's the second gear that is neutral and does not place a torque on the axle. In third gear the axle will try to twist forwards, and in first gear it will try to twist backwards. For this reason you really ...


4

If your rear spacing measures 115mm it might actually be designed as 110mm or 120mm. See here for standard hub spacings. 120mm freewheel hubs should be available, but you will only be able to fit a 5 speed freewheel onto it. If the frame is 100mm and steel you can probably expand the spacing to 120mm - see the page linked above for how that is done. You ...


4

I am 99% sure the dent in the fork blade is damage, and probably part of the problem you're seeing. The way you set up the two sections of allthread in the dropouts is smart, and is similar to the way dropouts are aligned. You could try to set the dropouts into alignment with the setup you've got, or bring the bike to a shop that has proper alignment tools, ...


4

V-brake calipers have a radial (with respect to the wheel) adjustment range, so they can accommodate the wheel axle moving fore or aft a little. What you need to do is make sure that the placement of the new dropouts does not place the wheel axle such that the brake track on the rim is outside the range of caliper adjustment. You could do this with a simple ...


4

The "horizontal" dropouts that are usually used with rim brakes are not completely horizontal but slanted so that adjusting chain tension moves the rim along tangent where the brake pads make contact with rim. In the video preview picture, the front-facing dropout is aligned like this. With this kind of dropouts, there is no problem with fixed gear,...


3

From your photo, it looks like you're fine. The load from the hub is being taken on the anti-rotation arm that you've attached to the lateral tubes of your mixte. So the anti-rotation washer (I'm presuming you're talking about the orange washer) is not being loaded. Also, as described in the responses to your previous question, your dropout is just ...


3

In my experience this is a problem with all such products. I use Pitlocks on my bikes and while they have slightly more corrugated interiors, they still slip. I have once sent a bike to be serviced and the shop extracted the Pit-locked rear wheel without damaging the bike or Pitlock. They said it was easier than making me post them the key. Since my bikes ...


3

That configuration is quite dangerous and clearly wrong. Do not ride the bike like that. Do not just tighten the nuts. I can clearly see the outline of where the derailleur was previously mounted. The derailleur should be mounted in a similar position. The small screw hole is a mount point for a carrier, which is probably why you cannot get things back how ...


3

Yes, it is unsafe. You should find a set of tires that will allow you to seat the wheel properly into the drop out.


3

Add a spacer and re-dish. Or move some spacers from the non drive side over the the drive side (if they exist) if you don't want to open up the frame (that will require opening up the hub likely). 1mm is not a big deal. You will also have to fiddle with the limits on your derailleur and adjust shifting accordingly. Or get a different cogset with something ...


3

Your frame is most likely intended for 135mm spacing and measures 134mm either because of manufacturing tolerance or because it was bent by using too narrow hub. The angle difference between 130mm and 135mm hubs is about 0.4 degrees, which is not really visible to naked eye. 135mm would be the way to go, but there is no immediate danger from keeping using ...


3

With a quick release system there are two potential width measurements: the inner width of the axel (which a skewer fits into) and the outer width of the hollow axle. The "quick-release 5 x 135mm" likely refers to the width of the quick release skewer diameter/width and the "Length 135 mm, Axis diameter 10 mm" is referring to outer diameter of the axel ...


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