60

There are (at least) two reasons. First, most (but not all) E-bikes use a control system that multiplies the amount of force or torque that you put into the pedals or cranks. Since power is the product of pedal speed and pedal force (or torque), increasing the torque allows the rider to reduce the pedal speed -- that is, the rider's cadence. Electric motors (...


50

I would add to the already existing answers some of the thoughts that come to me as a bike user. For me using a bicycle is a mean to prevent getting out of shape. Using an electrical bike would be like going hiking with a car or elevator. This applies for a lot of my friends riding bikes. Some of my colleagues complimented me on the fact that I exercise ...


49

In general studies have indicated that trained cyclists use pedaling frequencies higher than 90 rpm whereas untrained cyclists prefer frequencies around 60 rpm. I suspect the majority of e-bikers you encounter are not "trained" cyclists. Cycling co-opts a number of pathways we use for walking so people who are untrained typically cycle like they would walk, ...


38

Even with an e-bike going to 150 miles a week is a big jump. Likely you just need to have a few rest days to allow your body to adapt and recover. 3 weeks is the range in where you start run into problem with long term recovery. I'd suggest switching down to 3 days a week until you feel completely recovered every day. Also lay off the strava, going for ...


35

They don't need them but they are good to have. I have an e-bike that I use as a daily commuter. Here are my thoughts: E-bikes are heavier than regular bikes and put considerably more power out at the rear wheel (my motor has 350 watts, I add maybe 60-80 watts at most) compared to a regular bike which only has 80 watts alone. if you have an ebike with a ...


35

Personally it's because I'm using my ebike to get to work, wearing work clothes (which restrict my pedalling) and not wanting to get too sweaty. If I were just out for a ride I'd pedal faster.


21

I moved house in August, and have had a 26 km commute so roughly similar. Mine's got 50 metres drop on the way to work, so mostly flat. In my experience, you're in the distance where comfort becomes more important. Anyone can smash out a short commute every day, but these longer ones cumulatively build up on you. Clothes So expect to spend money on ...


19

According to Schwalbe at https://www.schwalbe.com/gb/e-bike.html For standard pedelecs with pedal assistance up to 25 km/h no specific tyres are stipulated by the legislators. But the loads and average speeds of these bicycles are also higher than in the case of normal bicycles. We therefore recommend only certain tyres as “E-Bike Ready 25”. ...


19

Cost is the overarching reason. Not only buying (and re-buying after theft!) but also maintaining. I can happily leave a cheap bike in the rain for a year; at worst I'll buy a new chain (€10) that I can easily replace myself. I'm living now in a relatively flat city of 250K with over 50K of students: I can buy a second-(well, probably third- or fifth-)hand ...


18

For me, as an occassional ebike rider, it feels I get kind of better connection to the bike when pedaling at lower cadence, but higher force. Because the electric assist otherwise reduces the needed force, it can feel like eternal downhill and it gets harder to sense your speed. But when I switch to higher gear so that I need to push harder on the pedals ...


17

Its designed to attach the prop of a model aircraft directly, i.e its designed to drive a fan that cools it. It has little (or none) weather protect, and would be destroyed on a bike in months. Another concern I would have with that motor is the shaft size- its one thing to deliver 2000W to a prop, but to connecting it to a mechanical drive train that can ...


17

I live in The Netherlands, where cycling is one of the most (if not the most) popular modes of transport, with an average of 1.3 bicycles owned per person (22.7 million bikes / 17 million citizens) [source]. So far, 1.9 million electric bikes have been sold country-wide. That roughly means 1 e-bike per 10 non-electric bikes sold, and 1 e-bike per 9 people. ...


16

DO NOT DO THIS! You can't safely charge any battery using jumper leads from another battery. If the other battery matches the flat one, but is fully charged, the current will be so high that you will probably start a fire. You will definitely damage the flat battery, and probably both of them. Jumper leads work on cars by having enough resistance that the ...


16

The limit is set by law depending on the country. There's nothing to prevent you from going faster if you can pedal harder. The limiter just cuts off the electric assistance above 25km/h, so you'll have to rely on pedal power alone above that speed!


16

Apart from going the high-tech route of a front suspension with lock-out, you can also try to get wider tires. The slow-down of wide tires is not that big, but they naturally even out high-frequency bumps. The wider the tire, the smoother your ride gets on the rough roads. Maybe, that's all you need.


15

Actually, when you are running the motor near the top of the speed limiter, it's the happiest and most likely drawing the least current. If you had a CycleAnalyst or other amp gauge, you'd see it reduce current as it reaches the point where the controller is turning it off to reduce the speed. The motor will be cutting in and out due to the limiter, but will ...


15

In brief - "sales and marketing" Changing tubes/tyres on an ebike can be more awkward, especially on the powered wheel, plus ebikes tend to attract less "mechanical" riders than regular bikes, being a gateway ride. So an ebike tyre will be a marketing term for higher puncture resistance and lower rolling resistance, and probably in the wider sizes to cope ...


14

The expense is part of it: for the price of a cheap electric bike I can buy a much better bike without a motor. A much bigger effect is that electric bikes are still bikes, with all the exposure to the weather, perceived risk, and at least some of the effort. So tempting people out of their cars onto electric bikes is a hard sell. Tax breaks might help but ...


13

Assuming you have a good quality electric assist bike from a major manufacture. The manufacturer provided the max assist setting, so they intend for it to be used. It's a safe bet the bike is built to take the max assist torque without sustaining damage or accelerated wear. If the manufacturer believes sustained use of max assist will affect the bike, it ...


13

Very quick answer - the torque numbers that are quoted are maximum torque values which do not correspond to maximum power. Power = torque × rotational speed, so, at slow speeds the motor unit can provide more torque (and hence more acceleration) while staying within the power limit. A bit more: There a decent page here on the characteristics of DC motors. ...


12

It could be that all they are doing is rotating the pedals - not because they have to input any force to make the bike go but because the motor will not run with receiving a continuous signal from a hall-effect switch coupled to the pedals. Thus the motor is enough to move the rider alone, but unless the rider is also rotating the pedals a cadence sensor ...


12

I don’t always use full assist for the following reasons: Range and Battery life. I can almost double range by biking more. This is especially the case when I’m down to 1-bar on the battery level so I pedal on the flat portions and keep the assist for the climbs. Exercise: sometimes you wanna ride a bike, get those juices flowing Go faster: my ebike has e-...


12

I don't (yet) own an E-Bike, but have spoken to my LBS a few times to find out whats happening in the market. My interest is Mountain biking more than road riding, but the observations probably apply more or less to the same extent. 1) People who are less fit / non-cyclists get into riding who otherwise would not. This does not appear to apply to you. 2) ...


11

I have tried to regulate the rear gear mechanism by adjusting the position screws but failed to make any improvement. That's almost never the adjustment that the rear derailleur needs. Those screws are called the limit screws, and they set how far in and out the derailleur can move. All they do is stop the derailleur from moving the chain all the way off ...


10

The E012 error means that the torque sensor is misaligned. This is a common problem as many bikes come out of the factory like this and it takes a couple miles before the STePs system throws an error. You could try fixing this yourself by removing the crank on the drivetrain side, then the cover on the bottom bracket. The one time I had this happen, the LBS ...


10

By velomobile you mean something like this, a fully enclosed/faired bicycle, tricycle, or quadricycle: Unless your commute is in the heavy rain/snow and you have a fully enclosed velo; or you're commuting more than 100 km on salt flats each way and need the air-resistance efficiency, there are very few advantages to a velomobile and very many disadvantages: ...


10

It looks to be an older Currie Electro Drive, they were originally made in 1996 i believe. I don't know much to anything else about them though other than that is one and they exist. Here is the companies website which offers support options. I would look for a serieal number and call them with questions about battery replacement. http://www.currietech.com/...


10

Well, there are a couple of reasons most MTB ebikes are 1x models: Modern motors on ebikes provide enough of a kick to get you up a steep hill as well as enough speed to go 50kmh on flats. Even a basic 750 watt motor is stronger and faster than almost any rider's legs. I’m not sure what more gears would give you except more complexity and weight. A modern ...


10

Depends totally on your bike's Battery Management System and what options it offers. Generally speaking, a battery has a certain amount of stored energy, which is its capacity in watt-hours, which may be expressed in amp-hours (at a known voltage). Functionally, a battery could put out energy at half the maximum rate, for twice as long. If your bike's BMS ...


10

Yes it can and I've seen it before, but the problems you describe sound like issues which could be fixed with a simple gear tune rather than being caused by worn-out components. The only one that I've seen wearing out that quickly could largely be blamed on the riding style of its owner. He was a heavy rider and reasonably strong, so he was someone who ...


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