18

Its designed to attach the prop of a model aircraft directly, i.e its designed to drive a fan that cools it. It has little (or none) weather protect, and would be destroyed on a bike in months. Another concern I would have with that motor is the shaft size- its one thing to deliver 2000W to a prop, but to connecting it to a mechanical drive train that can ...


10

It looks to be an older Currie Electro Drive, they were originally made in 1996 i believe. I don't know much to anything else about them though other than that is one and they exist. Here is the companies website which offers support options. I would look for a serieal number and call them with questions about battery replacement. http://www.currietech.com/...


8

The important number is not power, but torque. The linked page doesn't say it, but that 2000W is probably achieved at a huge speed (thousands of rpm). To get enough torque to drive the bike (and to step down the speed to usable levels, i.e. in the region of 50 rpm), you'll need a reduction gearbox. Finally, regulations for ebikes usually specify a max. ...


6

In your current set up, the electric brake lever sensor will protect against the situation where you're emergency braking but forgot to release the throttle. The brake sensors override the throttle because there's basically no reason to power the motor while braking. If your bike was configured to use a pedelec or pedal-assist mode, then the controller ...


4

Here is a video I found which is very detailed and shows how to add a second battery to your bike: Video: How To Add 2nd Battery to the Fiido D2 Here's the link to the battery which was recommended a ways down in the comments section: 36V 10Ah Battery Supplier In the video he explains that you are adding the second battery in parallel. Thus both ...


4

These RC motors are made to be used on much smaller and lighter objects than a bike+human combo. So even if it delivers 2k W, it will most likely just surge and either overheat, break its inner components, or at worst explode. Another issue you'll have with such a motor is that it's not waterproof so first water encounter and the thing is fried. Regarding ...


4

You might look at just upgrading your current approach—a lithium battery based cell phone charger (like the popular New Trent ones) generally go a lot further than AA based ones.


4

Probably the easiest way to fix your problem is to reduce the amount of power the GPS on your phone is using. By default, most GPS tracking programs eat up an enormous amount of battery because they default to maximum-accuracy settings. However, if you're going on long enough bike rides that you are worrying about battery life, you can probably afford to ...


4

Yes in theory but the gain is not practical. You’re better off swapping batteries than trying to jury rig something. Let’s do the calculations. You note that the AC charger puts out 36VDC at 2 amps. That’s 72 watts per hour. Even a modest eBike has an 8Ah battery, for a total of 36x8 or 288 watt-hours. At 72 watt-hours per hour charging it takes four ...


4

These cogs are very unlikely to exist. A proper gear-to-gear transmission uses an "involute" tooth profile, which is shaped so that the gears maintain a constant relative rate of rotation. A side effect of this design is that the tooth surfaces approximately roll against each other. The flower-cog pairing would have a large amount of slip (and thus friction/...


3

Not sure if I understand your question correctly, but I take it you want to ride unassisted during training/recreational rides? I don’t have much experience with electric bicycles but as far as I’m aware the motor often has its own free-wheel and therefore should contribute very little friction/resistance when it’s not running. The disadvantage of such a ...


3

This is a supplementary answer. You're concerned about your conversion screaming ebike. I'd like to challenge this premise. Some of the new geared hub motors are small enough to hide behind rear disc brakes and/or look like an IGH hub and are hardly noticeable. You can then hide the controller in a seat bag and hide the battery in a water bottle for the ...


2

My apologies if I have misunderstood the question, but connecting the output of a secondary battery to the charge input of the primary would not work "in the field" most, if not all such batteries include a BMS (battery management system) this limits the charge current, often not more than 2A (to avoid damage and fire etc). The primary battery output (when ...


2

Hmmmm... IMO if you get a schematic drawing for the bike you should be able to purchase a 2nd battery and find a method to connect that battery in parallel to the original. Having a second battery in parallel would mean both would charge & discharge at the same time. This should increase the life of both as heat from charging/discharging is a major ...


2

I did this. It is not impossible and very fun, some electronics skills required. Derate the motor: if the maker says "10Kw @ 100V" you know that the max admitted Amperes are 100. Cut that down to 40-50. Use a sensored Drive: RC motors` rotors position is determined mainly by reading back-emf. That doesnt work fine when you need to start the motor with a ...


2

This is going to be difficult. I assume you have a tadpole or delta and you're trying to drive the dynamos off the paired wheels - and not the single (drive) wheel. Problem 1: Single-Sided Hubs The problem is that the paired wheels often use single-sided (aka wheelchair) hubs and most dynamos are made with standard hubs that are designed to be supported on ...


2

There's a project on Kick Starter that looks like exactly what you're looking for: The Siva Cycle Atom The funding ends May 23rd 2013, and they should start shipping towards the end of 2013. So if you miss the window to be a Kick Starter backer, you should be able to pick one up directly form them around then.


2

Most front wheel motors will work on the trike and will install in a very similar way. There are a lot of kits on ebay, ranging in price from a couple of hundred dollars up through sensible prices to quite silly. See this question for some opinions on the cheap kits. Most crank motors will also work and be easy enough to install. This Sunstar kit, for ...


1

I called the shop where the dynamo was bought, and let me explain how to connect a cable. My summary: Unplug the plastic cover from the correct socket: One is for ground, one for phase. Thread the dismantled tip through one of the two holes in the cover. The length of the dismantled tip should be so that part of it protrudes below. Bend the protruding piece ...


1

On my commuter bike, my front dynamo hub charges a small 18650 battery that I then can tap to provide power to my smart phone. You need to have an intermediary battery because most dynamos only produce the German government mandated 6VAC / 3 watts minimum, which is around 0.5 amps (500 milliamps) -- and this is only when you're going faster than 15 km/h. ...


1

Check out this tech of my company Roadie Solar http://bicyclepatents.com/keeping-your-devices-charged-in-the-field/2220/ They are new but very light and fits on a bike rack. Possibly the lightest solar charger you can find on the market We are doing a kickstarter Next week.


1

I use a small external rechargeable USB backup battery. When the runtastic app & GPS run the phone battery down after 3-4 hours I connect the external battery for a few hours and it keeps the app going plus recharges the phone battery. I keep both the phone and backup battery in a small pouch on the top tube so I can hear the app say "distance, 24 miles:...


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