15

On a non-folding bike, I'd look at the wheels, and probably replace them with 36 spoke touring wheels and reasonably wide, tough tyres (e.g. 35mm). The tyres absorb some of the shock loads. However a folding bike has made some compromises affecting the structural strength, as well as introducing weak points. Two major ones are the main hinge and seat post. ...


9

tl;dr: if you want a sturdy folding ebike, you need to have a sturdy folding bike. Even if the bicycle statically/dinamically can stand more than the declared weight (at your own risk), the (expected) tolerance on the various parts and the quality of all the parts (both in terms of absolute quality and relative quality, relative to quality control) will ...


5

In order to ride at an average speed of 20 mph, especially when riding on the light setting you can't go at 20 mph on uphills. This means you need to go much faster than 20 mph on the flats. Let's say 22 mph on the flats would be enough. That's a whopping 35.4 km/h. Even on a road bike riding position (CdA 0.45 square meters) and using fragile low rolling ...


3

My main concerns would be spokes in the short term; but wheels can easily be exchanged. The second and graver concern is the frame. When I was riding about 100km per week, including some cobblestone and curbs, but nothing crazy, even "normal frames" (on your your standard average 500-1000$ bike) started to break; my weight then was around 80kg. (...


2

Cycling power is frequently measured is in watts. To know how much power the rider needs to contribute to a 20 mph speed over 50 miles you need to know: How much power is needed to sustain 20 miles per hour for 50 miles under the conditions (wind, hills, elevation, etc.) Subtract the power contributed by the electric motor What's left is the amount of power ...


2

Depends on how much the “light assist” setting actually assists. To ride 32km/h (20mph) on flat terrain with a road bike in road bike clothes you need about 170W to 210W. With a city-bike or mountain-bike and baggy clothing it’s much more. I think most eBikes have – depending on jurisdiction – at least 250W of motor power, so physically the motor would be ...


1

It is just possible to use a Normally Closed (NC) Single Pole Double Pole (SPDT) relay to open/cut the motor current/voltage when the handbrake lever switch is applied (i.e., when the handbrake lever is used to brake the vehicle/E bike/Escooter. The relay is, effectively, just used to reverse the standard Normally Open (NO) switch in the usual handlebar ...


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