78

After 50+ years as a cyclist, this is my approach - ride according to the conditions ride in reasonable proximity to the curb if safe, move over a little as traffic approaches know where I'm going, and do it assertively if somebody honks / shouts / waves, assume that they must be a friend, or are telling me something important, so smile broadly and wave ...


52

Whether it's rude is a matter of local custom. Whether you're offended by it depends on your flexibility and sensitivity Often, we cyclists can become a little over sensitive, after having to defend ourselves from car doors, pedestrians, cars, trucks, laws that don't take us into account, police who have a ticket quota, and even other cyclists. Relax. The ...


43

There are now many bike lights on the market which have a shaped beam with a "horizontal cutoff" giving strong light onto the road or path, but much less above the horizon. When adjusted correctly these allow you to see where you're going without dazzling oncoming traffic or pedestrians. I use a Busch & Muller Ixon IQ (pictured), but there are ...


40

Consider how you feel when a fellow cyclist approaches you will full beam straight ahead. It's pretty blinding, even for a moment, and especially off-road when your eyes aren't used to it. So in a park: Dim your light to its lowest setting (within reason). Put it on steady beam. Flashing is more visible but also more annoying and disorientating. Physically ...


39

Unethical, because you're imposing costs on the organisers anyway. Apart from the obvious "if you get hurt they're going to help you", they almost always face costs per participant and often have a limit on numbers. Violate those limits and the organisers will have problems. You're also causing wear and tear on the track, equipment and marshals. You can't ...


35

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


32

There's a fake Buddha quote on some internet sites which says, "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die." The most popular of the genuine Buddha quotes (the Dhammapada) begins with, "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. "He abused me, ...


29

I wouldn't consider it to be bad etiquette IF: You're not breaking the posted road speed limit. Watch not only for cars backing out but for kids. Watch for dogs. In small neighborhoods like this it's also not a bad idea to stay out in the lane and not hug the curb. This gives you much more time if a car or child comes hurtling out into the road and you're ...


29

I use the method in your 3rd picture - I take the middle of the lane when there are no bike lanes. I am helped in these cases by the fact that these roads in my city usually specify the right-most lane as a shared car and bike lane. Besides the speed issue you state when riding on the sidewalk, it is also hazardous for both the cyclist and pedestrians. I ...


25

Try making up a different backstory for the driver. You are already making one up, you know: speeds off to annoy the next bicyclist I do very well with assuming that the driver must have an unhappy marriage, or be on their way to a job they hate, or otherwise be preoccupied with their own misery, which impairs the way they drive. If they beep or say ...


24

Broadly, not a lot. Legally it's probably technically unlawful on several grounds (horn not used as a warning device, causing alarm, loud noise, possibly harassment), but they're all petty offences and unlikely to get a useful response from Police. If it happens in front of a cop they might pull the motorist over for a chat, but that's unlikely. My answer ...


23

It's common etiquette, at least everywhere I've been, to stay away from wet and muddy trails (unless they're supposed to be or always are a mudfest). Riding on a muddy trail makes ruts which make the trail conditions worse for everyone once the mud dries and the ground hardens. In addition to ruts, if the trail is muddy and you slide out a front wheel going ...


22

No. Absolutely not. And why would it be? Should you run a race through there without getting the residents onboard first? Of course not. (And who would?) But taking a bike ride through residential areas? Why would anyone object? And if they do, how could it possibly be labeled unreasonable for a cyclist to come down the street at 10-20 mph when cars come ...


20

In my experience, no. The problem is that however polite you try to be you're taking the lane so you're in their way. My commute takes me over a narrow one-lane-each-way bridge that's a bit of a choke point, so it's busy. It's also a raised bridge, so sight lines are very poor. Since I ride it twice a day I've had the chance to experiment with some ...


20

I use the following rule of thumb: If there is enough space for two cars next to me, I move to the side. If not, I keep the whole right lane for myself. I do the same even if only one lane is available in the direction; if the lane is too narrow in some parts (like in the city next to the tram stops), I occupy the whole lane and do not let cars overtake. ...


19

My experience is mostly in Canada as well (southern Ontario), so perhaps I can provide a closer-to-home viewpoint. I bike in a city with poor infrastructure that was designed for cars first, and everything else second (though that's changing). This means I get into a lot of situations where drivers honk at me, typically around 1 incident per 100km biked in-...


16

This is not strictly a bicycling issue. Do-gooders who ignore the rules and want to give the right of way all the time are also irritating to other drivers. They are not necessarily safer drivers, because "scared" is not exactly the same thing as "safe". There isn't anything you can do; just take cautious advantage of the right of way and keep going. The ...


16

The consequences for you as an individual are perhaps not as important as the broader ramifications of your behaviour. By behaving as if you think that the local rules of the road don't apply to you, you are contributing to a perception that cyclists are dangerous idiots who disregard the rules and the safety of themselves and others. This has the effect ...


14

I'm assuming you're in the US. If that's true, a bicyclist has the same rights (and obligations) as a motor vehicle, so etiquette doesn't come into it. You have the right to use the public roads (and the obligation to stop at stop signs). Unless there's something odd about your bike riding (you ride with a boom box cranked up to 11?), I would think you'd ...


14

I'd pick a different spot in the rack if possible. But if I was in a hurry or there wasn't another suitable place I'd use it (e.g. my bike doesn't fit on the bottom of the double stacker at the station; some places have decent racks and others that don't allow proper locking for all day use). I would try to make sure it's easy to get the lock off, perhaps by ...


12

Never. I drive a school bus (and ride a bike, of course - but never at the same time) and when bicyclists wave me through, I ignore them. There is no way that they can truly judge the space that I need without running into an oncoming car or them. Same goes for when I'm in my car. I trust my own judgment. If it means that I am driving behind them for a bit,...


12

The best revenge is riding your bike. Remember, they're stuck in a car, probably dealing with stop and go traffic, other jerk drivers and literally burning money from their gas tanks. You're on a bike, getting fresh air and exercise, probably making better time than the drivers, and definitely having a better time. Enjoy your self.


11

I has a sad that you even felt like you had to ask this question, no matter what kind of bike you have. :( Out of curiosity, where do you live? I would just try to be a considerate and careful cyclist. If you're used to riding, then you are used to being aware of crazy stuff that could happen around you.If you live in an area that makes you ask this ...


11

Blinding road users will be the result of the following factors: Total light output Mirror design (how is the light shaped) How you aimed your light Most trail lights (and high output battery powered lights) use a mirror that casts the light in a symmetrical shape. This means light is cast up, down, left and right. Light cast above the horizon is what ...


11

For those who subscribe to the rules: "Rule 19: Introduce Yourself If you deem it appropriate to join a group of riders who are not part of an open group ride and who are not your mates, it is customary and courteous to announce your presence. Introduce yourself and ask if you may join the group. If you have been passed by a group, wait for an ...


11

I’d say it’s totally okay if the road is not closed for the event and still open for cars and other vehicles.


10

This may sound simplistic. It's probably something you already do, and you can develop it further with practice and awareness. Acknowledge your feelings: "That interaction was very painful. I didn't like that at all." Then gently let them go: "Everything is OK. I am safe, and life keeps on going. This is great weather. When I get home, I'm going to listen ...


10

I had to face exactly this on an old commute. Dipping the front light was absolutely necessary in a park and another stretch of unlit bike path. It was a bright enough light to illuminate the road, though not well enough to ride at any decent rate on low power. The solution I found to this was to add a narrow-beam head torch. This can be dipped hands ...


9

Some tips I've gathered from being on both sides of the fence. Since you're specifically asking riding safely and minimizing motorist antagonism, there are some which will work but might not appeal to your sense of justice/fairness: Even higher visibility. One way of antagonising drivers is to appear at the last moment, since they won't have time to plan ...


9

As Alesplin puts it, it is common practice to stay off of trails that are muddy. I'd like to expand on his answer a little. I think there are a few factors that come into play with a question like this. One of the biggest contributors of damage to a muddy trail is large amounts of traffic. The more people that use the trail, the more damage will be done. ...


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