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20

In Holland, were I assume cycling is much more common than in Poland, the kind of traffic sign you describe are abundant (see example, "uitgezonderd" is Dutch for "except for"). And cycling against traffic in a one-way street without the sign is indeed illegal. The same rules seem to apply in Poland, though I cannot find a reliable source for Polands ...


15

Just to add to FatHippos answer: The same applies to Germany. In my home town there was a survey of all one-way roads between 2004 and 2010, which resulted in most of them now being open for bikes in both directions. These roads are also marked explicitly with a sign like the one you describe.


13

There is also a Czech version of allowing you to bike 'the other direction'. Biking against the one way direction is not much of a crime here and where the traffic is low, it's usually tolerated. I'd advise against biking the wrong direction in traffic heavy places like city centers, though, even when it's allowed. These signs (and corresponding ...


10

I'm not sure about Austria, but here in the UK many general sports shops are no more than outlets for Nike and Adidas clothing. If you are someone who knows very little about bikes, I'd suggest that this would be riskier than going to a specialised bike shop. The only thing that would possibly make the general sports shop more attractive would be price. But ...


7

There are several places to avoid if you are looking for a cheap bike, and several places to seek. First to avoid: Generally bikes tend to be pricier / lower quality in all towns with a big university because demand is high and many bikes are "consumed" by the buyer. Lots of exchange students buy a bike and discard it after a year rather than resell it, ...


5

Decathlon and InterSport are decent enough shops, but I wouldn't want to walk in, spend €700 on a bike and kit, and ride 2300km. There's also a Giant store in Nantes. In an ideal world you'd get something second hand and have it serviced (or buy second hand from a bike shop that has already serviced it). Getting all the luggage fitted and everything set up ...


5

Shimano has a pretty good track record of wear parts availability for older groupsets. I am using 8-speed myself, and there are several European mail order stores as well as local shops that have spare cassettes and chains. I would expect that 9-speed spare parts aren't going away either. The problem with off-road groups is that rear derailleurs are not ...


5

I didn't think this was possible, but Google came up with this site (in Dutch) https://www.fietsverhuur.nl Apparently they deliver rental bikes in Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany and Luxemburg. I assume they can also arrange a pickup at a different location, if the price is right 😉. It isn't clear if this is just for groups, but you could contact them ...


5

I don't know any community bike shops in the Netherlands, never really heard it this although I understand what you mean. What you will find, is a Repair Café. It's a place where people get together helping each other repair their stuff. Often there's tools of all kinds and you can usually bring a bike too. It has a big community aspect; you can use each ...


5

I would be in favor of waiting until you move. There is the possible problem of needing service work under warranty and the nearest dealer being some distance away. You must also factor in the shipping cost along with the expense of disassembly and reassembly if you can't do it yourself. There is also no better way to start a good relationship with your ...


5

In France, the sign was made explicit and a special contraflow lane was added. All roads where you can cycle against the flow on a one-way road is marked with this sign: This is a very common occurrence in cities where cycling is popular! See this wikipedia article for a bit more background, although the french version is more extensive.


4

I concur with PeteH's answer, with the caveat that local bike cultures, and certainly individual bike shops, can sometimes skew heavily in the direction of a specific kind of riding or a specific kind of rider... who may not be you. So it's completely fine to walk out of a local bike shop that treats you like something you'd scrape off the bottom of your ...


4

I took part in a charity ride from Scotland to Italy in June last year, and that was made a lot easier with the use of a support team to help carry everything. Since you are going it alone, you need to consider quite a lot of things: Directions It's fine planning a route, but they often don't go to plan. Always be prepared to make alterations at the last ...


4

In Amsterdam, bikes collected by the city (gemeente) are stored in the fietsdepot. Summary information is available in English. I would call them to get the latest and most accurate info, but according to their website, the bikes can be purchased in two ways: If one has a Stadspas, which is a city pass obtainable by lower income folks, then you can go to a ...


4

If you really want to be sure the bike isn't stolen: The Dutch Police also has a tool called Fiets diefstal register (fdr). All bikes that are reported stolen to the police are put in this register. You can either search for a chipnumber which can be found on higher quality locks (long number starting with 999 or 975), or you can search for the framenumber, ...


4

Have a look at http://blog.ch3.gr/ He is an average cyclist who did a UK to Greece ride 3 years ago and has captured all important information in that blog.


4

This seems very unlikely. It's possible for car rental because the same company has premises in both cities and they do enough volume of business that having a few cars move from place to place won't make a huge difference to them. That doesn't seem likely for bikes. However, Brussels is only two hours from Amsterdam on the train, and you can take bikes on ...


4

Why do you think they aren't recycled? EU legislation is pretty strict on what can go in landfill and it would be very surprising if the bikes fished out of the canals aren't recycled (i.e., melted down and the metal used for something new). 20,000 bikes is going to be at least 200 tons of scrap metal. After being underwater for a while, the bikes are ...


3

In the end, the only option I found is Rent a road bike. They do have hybrid bikes (which are cheaper than road bikes), but they charge a fee for cross-border one-way rentals. Overall on the expensive side, but they do exactly what I asked.


3

Having converted two 70-something Motobecans, take to your best local shop to figure out what fits your bottom bracket. As Mikes asked Is the issue the French bottom bracket? Or reverse threads? As a last resort, Velo Orange has a bracket that will work. DO get rid go the cottered cranks!


3

This sign is also common in france; it means no entry except for bicicles. (source: fubicy.org)


2

In UK it would not be allowed unless there was an additional sign stating otherwise. The same rules apply to all vehicles on the road. I don't think Google maps necessarily actually always accurately provide the best route. For example from my house it would better to get off the bicycle and cross the park on foot than cycle around the roads to get to the ...


2

This is Bicycles.SE, we're more aimed at helping you overcome practical problems. Since its a nice looking bike, why not fix it? Please tell us more about the problem/damage, with photos of the broken parts.


2

Various options: stolen bikes which are too risky to carry along drunken/stoned people's act vandalism (I have often seen bikes with the wheel bent to badly like somebody jumped on the sprokets just to damage them) accidents (poorly parked bikes can actually fall in the canals when hit)


1

The rims are Rigida, they are double wall aluminum, not steel. I agree on the late 70's early 80's, might be a custom frame made for someone short. The framebuilder would have gone lug-less due to the interference in the head tube, down tube top tube junctions.


1

This bike looks like my 1998 Specialized Stumpjumper based on color, setup and my guess that the logo behind your left leg is a Specialized S. That's the best I can given the blurry photo and the mud on the frame.


1

European prices always include VAT, and US prices are typically announced without sales tax (or customs, if you really intend to order from US). Once you add the sales tax, the prices are closer. Generally, you will pay extra for a brand that is commonly not available in Europe. In addition to Surly, Thorn is easily available in Europe from UK and cheaper ...


1

A specialized bike shop is a good idea, but so are bike co-ops and related things. A dealer who specializes in used bikes is a good bet as well - it will be cheaper probably and they will probably have a selection of good commuters.


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