25

The short answer to your question is "probably between 2.5 and 3.5 miles; the faster the runner the closer to 2.5 while the slower the runner the closer to 3.5." The long answer is quite long. As you already noted in your question, the full answer depends on pace; but it also depends on the surface being run or ridden on, whether it is up hill, down hill, ...


14

If you want to do a competition which gives a (good runner, mediocre cyclist) even chances against a (good cyclist, mediocre runner) then you might use the same ratio as the Ironman triathlon. It has a 112-mile (180.25 km) bike and a marathon 26.2-mile (42.2 km) run which puts the ratio of distance cycled/distance run at roughly 17/4. EDIT: Based on ...


14

Breathe however you need to in order to get oxygen in. This goes for your mouth, nose or a combination of both. Riders warming up on their trainers have cotton in their noses that contains something like vapor rub that helps open up the nasal passages. They don't have it in their noses during the race itself.


11

The NuVinci system is fantastic in principle and one day all bikes might come with it, but we aren't there yet. As the system stands there are a few matters that might not make it the answer to your prayers of an easier time going up hills: For hilly terrain you need gears - it goes without saying. The steeper the hills the bigger range of gears - going up ...


11

If you really want to measure how much effort you're putting in, you should look into getting a power meter. It measures the actual wattage you output, and can therefore be used to calculate total energy output. However, they are quite expensive. The other option is to get a heart rate monitor along with cadence and speed meters which together can give you ...


10

$50 - $100 isn't going to get you much in parts, especially any that would be an "upgrade" from your current setup. If you're riding your bike often, it's possible that you'll spend an amount approaching that this year on new tubes and/or tires when you get a flat or wear your tires out. My suggestion would be to ride this bike and enjoy it. You'll get your ...


9

I don't think you have a problem here. Physiologically, your thighs are the engine room of your legs. They are designed for endurance and power and can keep working at a high output for extended periods of time. Your calves are more for short bursts of power, such as jumping or sprinting. They can't sustain high power output for any length of time. In ...


9

Breathing in the cold air probably didn't help, but what you describe happens to most people after doing hard intervals and only goes away with recovering. As far as preventing it in the future, the only thing I can recommend is not maxing out and going anaerobic by chasing cars and going into zone 4/5 heart rate. Edit for Clarification When I refer to ...


8

For some people, weather conditions (specifically: temperature and humidity) make a big difference. Not so much for direct intake of oxygen, but because repeated inhalation of cold, dry air directly through the mouth can cause significantly more irritation of the airways and lungs, triggering asthma symptoms. Breathing through the nose warms and slightly ...


8

It depends on a lot of things, like how fit you are to start with and how well the bike fits you. The same distance can be a very different amount of effort depending on the surface, incline etc. But as a general rule (and assuming you're in decent health) tired is fine, muscle aches are to be expected, but don't ignore pain especially in your joints. As ...


7

It could be due to your bike fit, but there's a lot of power in your quads, and if you will note a lot of pros (very noticeable track) cyclists have large quads. I think this might help you, it shows what muscles are responsible for what part of a pedal stroke: http://imgur.com/QFYRPdV https://njcyclestudios.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/power.jpg


7

There is a technique known as "toeing". Basically, as you turn the crank with your feet your toe angles up and down -- up at the top of the stroke and down at the bottom. This makes use of some of the strength/energy of the calf muscles. But to do this well you must be riding with the ball of your foot on the pedal (generally implying toe clips or "...


7

I don't see much point in "improving" the bike until you decide what improvements you need. About the only thing I can think of that you might want to change right off is the tires, if they're heavily lugged (which I can't tell from the description) and you prefer road to off-road riding. And, of course, you may find that a different seat would suit you ...


7

Buy a recumbent exercise bike instead and you'll be much more able to play games. But if you're training for serious upright riding rather than general fitness that will not be what you want. I have used one of these for a while and used to read while riding it. That worked fine, but once my broken collarbone healed I lost interest (but I live in Sydney ...


6

While the idea of comparing the distances of the cycling and running portions of the Ironman triathlon might seem appealing at first, you'll quickly see that the times of those distances aren't quite the same. The cycling portion of the Ironman typically takes participants about 1.25 times as long as the running portion, varying somewhat between competitors ...


6

Your family or significant other will only give you a few hours leave(like Annual leave) from home to go out riding.


6

Using my two Garmin devices, I lay down for 30 minutes watching a film. Both recorded an average heartrate of 60 bpm. The 810 gave 35 kcal, the 910xt 45 kcal So 70 - 90 kcal per hour : 1680 - 2160 kcal per day. It looks like the BMR is included in the figures, so that I have to subtract 100 kcal an hour or so to estimate my additional expenditure. Garmin ...


6

Enough for a little expertise - yes, enough to train for a 100 mile ride, no. If you are just looking for some healthy exercise you can gradually increase distance and/or speed and back off if you over exert yourself. If you are unused to exercise or are not currently in great shape, you should consult a doctor before trying anything significantly harder ...


5

I would recommend take a different path to work everyday or every week if you can. Not only will it make for a longer more fitness path but will also be more interesting to see new sites every time.


5

First off you will need to have a think about what kind of riding you want to do. For roads you'll want a touring bike, and for off road, a mountain bike. The key differences are: Weight - riding rough trails and off road requires a strong frame. This will impact weight Suspension - again, this adds weight, but can be essential on really rough terrain ...


5

The problem here is that the effort spent is differently. A "good" 45 y.o. runner capable of qualifying for Boston Marathon might do a 3:30 marathon (26.2) while a "good" biker on reasonably flat course might cover around 90 miles on a bike in the same time (87.5 miles @ 25 mph). The marathoner would likely be very much done for the day while the biker ...


5

What supporting muscle groups need to be strengthened? All of them! Cycling is a full body sport, despite what some people will say. Ever ridden a long ride on a road bike? You may have soreness all the way from your neck to your toes. Some of this can be from poor bike setup, but that's another topic entirely. The major muscles are obviously going to be ...


5

How long do you have? How strong is your motivation? How good are the bikes? Unfortunately, most exercise bikes have a very poor "simulated feel", and a real cyclist tires of them pretty quickly. This is especially true of the old friction bikes and many of the wind and magnetic trainers. A few (Expresso bikes, and some of the newer Le Monde bikes that ...


5

I seriously doubt that it's due to the lack of shocks, unless you have some really bad roads there -- many people ride bikes great distances with no shocks, skinny, stiff tires, and no real springs in the seat. More likely your problem is with your posture -- seat too low, handlebar too low, handlebar too close or too far away, and/or pedals at the wrong ...


5

How about aerobars without the bars? You just need the tv set on floor slightly tilted so you don't break your neck. For example Zipp Alumina Clip has several possible setups for comfortable "riding" position. You can ride in sitting position every now and then to stretch your hip and back. Remember to keep your back straight and shoulders down. :)


5

Bike weight and performance is only one factor. Your average speed and whether or not you have inclines would also factor in, of course. You can have a light bike with skinny wheels and burn as many calories by averaging 18mph, or a heavy bike and burn the same calories at a lower speed, etc... Coincidentally, this month's Bicycling Magazine has a brief ...


5

Learning to listen to your body equates to developing discipline in your training. Changing the type of exercise can help you give specific muscle groups rest but you can still exercising without the discipline to meter your effort and therefore not actually rest. My suggestion is to write out your exercise plan and journal how you do. The aim of the plan ...


5

This type of effort very much comes down to W/Kg at FTP (Functional Threshold Power). You can get lighter, or you can work to raise FTP. There is no magic formula to improve FTP, it requires (beyond a basic level of fitness) either a coach, or some well thought out self coaching. A power meter and knowledge of how to use it is an invaluable tool, but ...


4

The best advice I'm seeing here is to go to your bike shop and try out a few bikes. When you have a few test rides behind you, then you'll have a better idea of what questions to ask. What this boils down to: Test-ride a few bikes, buy one, have fun with it. Everything else is details. Bike types I'd concentrate my search on hybrids and hardtail ...


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