11

If you really want to measure how much effort you're putting in, you should look into getting a power meter. It measures the actual wattage you output, and can therefore be used to calculate total energy output. However, they are quite expensive. The other option is to get a heart rate monitor along with cadence and speed meters which together can give you ...


11

To have legs like professional cyclists you need to train like one. With only 20 minutes a day you are not going to make it. You need to find time, many hours per day, most days a week. If you want to get there in the shortest possible time, without injuries, you need to find yourself a coach. If your local sport clubs have an amateur cycling section, that's ...


9

Breathing in the cold air probably didn't help, but what you describe happens to most people after doing hard intervals and only goes away with recovering. As far as preventing it in the future, the only thing I can recommend is not maxing out and going anaerobic by chasing cars and going into zone 4/5 heart rate. Edit for Clarification When I refer to ...


9

Using my two Garmin devices, I lay down for 30 minutes watching a film. Both recorded an average heartrate of 60 bpm. The 810 gave 35 kcal, the 910xt 45 kcal So 70 - 90 kcal per hour : 1680 - 2160 kcal per day. It looks like the BMR is included in the figures, so that I have to subtract 100 kcal an hour or so to estimate my additional expenditure. Garmin ...


8

I can play like this for an hour or so Get a multi elevation desk (Like this one around $35 from Amazon) it allows you to lower and tilt the TV UP toward you reducing neck strain adding cheap armrest bars/aerobars (like these around $20 from Amazon) allows you to rest your elbows comfortably while riding the bike, keeping your weight forward. Adding a heart ...


8

It depends on a lot of things, like how fit you are to start with and how well the bike fits you. The same distance can be a very different amount of effort depending on the surface, incline etc. But as a general rule (and assuming you're in decent health) tired is fine, muscle aches are to be expected, but don't ignore pain especially in your joints. As ...


8

If you want to run fast, you need somewhat structured training. Normal bicycle commuting is certainly beneficial to ones health, but without structuring it it will be often too short fort endurance training or too slow for speed training. If you want to be fast (on the bike, but there is some limited overlap) you need to train shorter fast sections - like ...


7

Buy a recumbent exercise bike instead and you'll be much more able to play games. But if you're training for serious upright riding rather than general fitness that will not be what you want. I have used one of these for a while and used to read while riding it. That worked fine, but once my broken collarbone healed I lost interest (but I live in Sydney ...


6

Your family or significant other will only give you a few hours leave(like Annual leave) from home to go out riding.


6

Enough for a little expertise - yes, enough to train for a 100 mile ride, no. If you are just looking for some healthy exercise you can gradually increase distance and/or speed and back off if you over exert yourself. If you are unused to exercise or are not currently in great shape, you should consult a doctor before trying anything significantly harder ...


6

Cycling 2 km in 16 minutes is about 8 km/h which could be fast or slow depending on the gradient. No this won't do a lot for your running sprint, because climbing is about endurance, and running sprints is about peak power. Diets are really personal, and well outside the scope of this site. Age and weight really aren't comparable. Height and weight are ...


5

I am an underweight female so loosing weight is NOT my goal. I wish to get mentally fit and therefore I wish to tire myself out without getting bored. They say physical exercise is necessary to get rid of depression. Hence I chose to cycle out. First and most important is the depression. You should really go to a bike shop and hop on a few different bikes ...


5

How long do you have? How strong is your motivation? How good are the bikes? Unfortunately, most exercise bikes have a very poor "simulated feel", and a real cyclist tires of them pretty quickly. This is especially true of the old friction bikes and many of the wind and magnetic trainers. A few (Expresso bikes, and some of the newer Le Monde bikes that ...


5

I seriously doubt that it's due to the lack of shocks, unless you have some really bad roads there -- many people ride bikes great distances with no shocks, skinny, stiff tires, and no real springs in the seat. More likely your problem is with your posture -- seat too low, handlebar too low, handlebar too close or too far away, and/or pedals at the wrong ...


5

What supporting muscle groups need to be strengthened? All of them! Cycling is a full body sport, despite what some people will say. Ever ridden a long ride on a road bike? You may have soreness all the way from your neck to your toes. Some of this can be from poor bike setup, but that's another topic entirely. The major muscles are obviously going to be ...


5

How about aerobars without the bars? You just need the tv set on floor slightly tilted so you don't break your neck. For example Zipp Alumina Clip has several possible setups for comfortable "riding" position. You can ride in sitting position every now and then to stretch your hip and back. Remember to keep your back straight and shoulders down. :)


5

Bike weight and performance is only one factor. Your average speed and whether or not you have inclines would also factor in, of course. You can have a light bike with skinny wheels and burn as many calories by averaging 18mph, or a heavy bike and burn the same calories at a lower speed, etc... Coincidentally, this month's Bicycling Magazine has a brief ...


5

Learning to listen to your body equates to developing discipline in your training. Changing the type of exercise can help you give specific muscle groups rest but you can still exercising without the discipline to meter your effort and therefore not actually rest. My suggestion is to write out your exercise plan and journal how you do. The aim of the plan ...


5

This type of effort very much comes down to W/Kg at FTP (Functional Threshold Power). You can get lighter, or you can work to raise FTP. There is no magic formula to improve FTP, it requires (beyond a basic level of fitness) either a coach, or some well thought out self coaching. A power meter and knowledge of how to use it is an invaluable tool, but ...


4

You've just become familiar with the feeling of exercise induced nausea. Don't worry, you're not at all alone. No matter your long distance endurance, it happens after a period of over exertion ( any amount of exertion more than your body is used to, regardless of your fitness level ), and is sometimes exacerbated by not enough or too much hydration.


4

Very hard to answer without knowing your budget. I would suggest a hybrid style bike. They have an upright riding position and geometry designed for comfort over speed (road racer) or agility (MTB). They have largish tires to absorb the minor bumps. Look at a bike with 29" (700C) wheels and at least 1.5" (35mm) tires for the smoother ride you want. You ...


4

The short answer is no, there is no standard equivalent for effort between distance and elevation. Of course, as others have mentioned, they are connected by the amount of effort you put in. But as you ride faster on the flat, the power required to drive you along rises as the square (some say the cube) of your speed. So riding 10% faster takes 20% to 30% ...


4

In the end, you generally get a better workout when you have a faster bike. This is because you usually end up riding more often/longer distances than you would otherwise. Also, riding fast is fun. And when you're having fun you don't notice the pain nearly as much. Just enjoy it and feed your speed addiction. You won't lose fitness. More likely you'll be ...


4

I'd say riding outside is always better than a spin class or turbo-time. I ride a hilly commute to work throughout the winter 10x 30mins each way, but do intervals too - and ride fixed gear for extra effort. Commuting through winter gets a bad rap (depending on where you live). Sometimes, here in the UK, the weather can be pretty crap, but you do get some ...


4

Edit: As discussed in the comments, I assume that OP is allowed to take a total of 2 hours of breaks, not that the ride (moving time) itself must be shorter than 2 hours. A 30km/h average speed over 60km would be challenging even for an experienced rider on good (but public) roads on a road bike. It sounds like you are in quite a good shape. You should ...


3

It really depends on speed. If you go slow (and there is no headwind) then riding on the flat is almost effortless (rolling friction is a very small factor with properly-inflated road tires). What slows you on the flat is wind resistance, and the faster you go the more wind resistance you face. On the other hand, climbing a hill of a given height consumes ...


3

For core, read Tom Danielson's "Core Advantage". It's exactly what I did in PT after getting hit by a car and suffering lots of back pain. The key is inner core. So no crunches. The inner core muscles are associated more with balance than movement. Not saying you don't need outer core too, but most people neglect IC in pursuit of 6-pack abs. In the off-...


3

Probably best to see a doc. But it would probably work to lay off for 3-4 days (at least until you can gently cycle without immediate pain), then start up again, being careful to limit the stress on the area. If your pain level stays low then SLOWLY work up, otherwise back off or stop (and see the doc). You should probably find some stretches (from a PT ...


3

I get enough stretching while getting my pants on before a ride. I take the first 10 minutes fairly slowly too, because its in traffic with lights. A drink of water before you go helps with pre-hydrating. Afterward, do a cooldown ride for the last 5-10 minutes, not too fast. A hot shower helps, followed by clean fresh clothes. Then go clean your bike. ...


3

I prefer light jogging or running before. If that's not possible then some light stretching would be good since it tends to warm up the muscles for more rigorous activity later on. Do not forget to hydrate enough before cycling, during the pre-workout. Even skipping ropes works if you can do that. Afterwards, a stretching becomes mandatory to relax the ...


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