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18

What you're witnessing is probably a mixture of convenience and all-around-increased popularity of fat bikes, rather than actual 'benefits' A lot of people don't have the luxury of owning multiple bikes: one for the road, one for grocery trips, one for cross country, etc. If someone only has the resources for one bike, and they chose a fat bike because they ...


8

The short version: Yes, they are feasible. The long version: You can do a minor adjustment of my answer in this question by changing the molar masses involved. The molar mass of carbon dioxide is 44.01 g / mol. The ideal gas law says PV=nRT, where P is pressure, V is volume, R is the ideal gas constant and T is temperature (in an absolute scale, e.g. ...


5

From my experience, no they would not. Have you ever watched anyone ride a fatbike? Their front tire wobbles all over the place, the extra weight from the heavy tires makes fine-adjustments much more difficult, putting extra fatigue on your body. That being said, training with a bike that's not suited for skinnys will make riding them easier when you hop on ...


5

I have/do carry an Lezyne Allow Drive pump. I have spent a lot of time pumping fat tires in really cold temperatures and although it's not as quick, it's compact and packs well. That Lezyne floor version doesn't look too bad, but it is still a bit big to pack for my tastes. It looks like they have a specific HV hand pump out that is designed like their ...


5

Having ridden both on a lot of ice for years, I'll answer that most of the fatbikes I have ridden tend to be more stable on ice than a MTB. The wider your tires are (and at lower pressure) the less likely that the wheel will slip (side to side) easily. Riding on snow and ice are very separate things. Snow is actually very easy to ride provided it is ...


5

Fat bike tyres (3.8" or bigger) are unlikely to fit in the frame or fork of your BSO. In addition, such large tyres require wider rims (typically 50-100mm internal width) which you are also unlikely to have. Finally, fat tyres have their advantage in 'floating' over sand or snow, however they won't grip on ice as well as a studded tyre.


5

The math is easy to do. According to Sheldon Brown, fatbike chainline is 66 or 76mm for dropout spacings of 170 and 190mm respectively. Assuming a 100mm BB is used with a 170mm dropout spacing and 66mm chainline: a 5" tire is approximately 127mm wide so the tire would extend 63mm off the centerline of the bike. That's only 3 mm clearance if the chain is ...


4

Here are the things I believe you should be considering when making the decision. Fat bikes climb just fine. Yes, a road bike will climb a paved hill more efficiently than a mountain bike under the same conditions. But, a mountain bike will also climb a muddy single track that a road bike would simply fail to move at all on. Efficiency and utility are ...


4

I'll venture a guess that currently there are two lines defining the "plus" range you are talking about. Anything under 2.75 to 3 inches will likely be defined as a regular MTB tire. These were often called "fat tires" until Surly popularized the Endomorph, which made the term "fat tire" fall out of favor for regular mountain bike tires. The original ...


4

Along with checking position on the bike it's worth checking to see whether the reach can be adjusted on your brakes in case you're over-stretching your hand. Check the angle too - stand behind the bike and reach the bar, extend your fingers straight forward following the line of your arm and adjust the lever to meet under your finger(s).


4

Looking at the spec, your bike has a double front chainring. Are you shifting into the smallest front ring when climbing? If not, then do so. You can possibly buy a smaller front chainring too, that will leave the higher gears alone for faster/road usage, like downhills. The single cheapest solution is to pace yourself by slowing down, harden up your ...


4

Here are potential issues that may or may not arise from such solution that I see. Geometry changes. As it has always been, control that the head tube angle of the bike changes in a way that does not worsen its handling. I, for one, use 27.5+ wheels and tires with a fat bike fork made by Surly originally shipped for 26" wheels with 4.8" tires. However, the ...


4

Super hard to measure without a power meter. But you could approximate it using various web resources. https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/ lists the best fatbike tyre as a "Schwalbe Jumbo Jim Liteskin PaceStar" with 36.9 W of rolling resistance. The best road tyre is a tubular at 7.7W with most clinchers (ie normal tyres) under 20W per wheel and ...


4

Generally fat bikes seem to have the bars at about the same height as the saddle, which the Fat Caad complies with. If you personally want the bars a little higher that's fine. The Caad stem length is quite short so it has limited potential for raising the bars. Riser bars in conjunction with a different stem will help.


3

Using only 9 cogs of a 10 speed cassette will not work as the shifter throw (amount of cable pulled/released) is different between 9 and 10 speed systems. Considerations: Derailleur Cage Length. To go to 42 tooth set up you need to verify you have the long cage version of your Alivio derailleur. Medium cage Shimano derailleurs typically can accommodate ...


3

The caliper is touching the wheel because the caliper was designed for a disk to be there, but the wheel was designed for spokes to be there. With a disk-brake wheel, the spoke flange on the hub is moved closer to the centerline to make room for the disk, which would be where the spokes are now. There are only a few standards for mounting disk brakes, which ...


3

Old Man Mountain sells a kit (PH-SH-F-THRU-BLUTO) for mounting their Phat Wide Sherpa Rack on the front with a RockShox Bluto fork (which your bike has). To quote the page: Phat Sherpa Front with 15mm Thru Axle (For Rockshox Bluto). Comes with Robert Axle Project replacement thru axle and all other parts needed for installation. Part Numbers included in ...


3

The spacing is the only difference across the SRAM/TRUVATIV GXP line of BB's, so yes, you can use the 68/73mm left/right cup set on your frame. Just reuse the center seal/spacer from your existing BB, especially if you're riding a lot in the winter or rain. Funny enough I've seen cheaper prices for the less widely used 100mm than the far more common 68/73 ...


3

A 26"x3.5 tire should work on any narrow 4" fat bike rim. That is: 60mm-70mm wide rims. It might work on an 80mm rim depending on the actual width of the tire. But will definitely not work on a 5" fat bike rim which is 100mm wide. Surly does not recommend their Black Floyd (listed at 26"x3.8" but actually narrower) road tire for rims wider than 65mm, for ...


3

Having recently spent a day MTBing when it's not something I've done before, I'd say most of it is unfamiliar use of muscles (plus you're holding on tighter than you need to). If you start riding like this regularly, it will get better as your skills improve and as your muscles get used to it (it's not that they're weak but using the strength in that ...


3

For most of the people who I've seen ride them it's because they're harder to push. The 4" fat tyres also have thicker walls, so flexing them takes more effort, on top of the greatly increased angular momentum. That means that commuting to work takes more effort. If you're trying to get fit, that's what you need. It's worth noting that many of these people ...


3

There are more variables that you are missing. Rim width is also a factor as well as the tire "setup" itself (tubeless or tubed). So all the variables you would be looking at are tire width and size, rim width, tire pressure and wheel setup (tubeless or tubed). For any or the data to be meaningful, you'd need all of that data. Generally you will get the ...


3

A quick way is to get the closest then then scale p is presure d is diameter pScale = pKnown * dKnown * dKnown / dScale / dScale here a close is 26 x 2.4 16 gram so pScale = 27 * 2.4 * 2.4 / 4.5 / 4.5 = 6.68 p is linear with mass so 25gram = 6.68 * 25 / 16 = 12 but on a fat bike I would just carry a high volume pump


3

How much snow are we talking about? I’ve commuted through the winter on a cyclocross and had very little problems. The roads here (Austria) are usually cleared quite well, so I’ve never had deep snow. For black ice I used studded tires (Nokian Hakka W106) which — due to their narrowness (35mm) — also work quite well on slush. I’ve had the most difficulties ...


3

I train a lot on my fat bike usually on rides from 50-70 km (30-45 miles), typically on a lot of hills on and off road. The benefit is that when I get on my carbon road bike I notice an improvement in power and endurance.


2

Since I have owned my fat bike (with 4 inch tires) I have not ridden my mountain bike. The fat bike is a little heavier pushing - but when I add more air pressure I cannot tell the difference from my mountain bike. On the Fat Bike it's all about air pressure for different riding. On pavement add max air pressure for less rolling resistance. The 60 tpi (...


2

I found this image on "the web." It doesn't give a comprehensive answer to your contact patch comparison request, but it gives a pretty clear idea of the difference.


2

I like fixed as the front end is lighter and it does not move around. Carbon if you are willing to spend the money. Single speed means no derailleur to break. And smaller chain ring and bash guard gives you more clearance. I don't think you want a real wide tire. I would think like a 2.1 - preferably tubeless. If you start riding 2" pipe you may even ...


2

Though not supported by specialized, your best option is to probably setup your wheels tubeless with tire sealant. Keep an extra bottle of sealant with you just in case you have trouble on the trail and need a refresh, but keep a tube handy if that fails as well. Some folks have had good luck by injecting some tube sealant (like slime) inside their inner ...


2

There are two things that occur to me. One is easy, which is buy one of the 11-40 9spd cassettes made by Sunrace or IRD. Then, after making sure your RD has the total capacity (it's 45t for RD-M4000, so you're seeing if the [large cog - small cog]+[large ring - small ring] number is equal or less than 45) number required, you'll need to drop it down a little ...


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