Hot answers tagged

64

Was going to comment, but I'll make this an answer - it's the bike, not you. No, I really do mean it's the bike..... The bike as a fixie with 48/19 gearing is suitable for a cycle fit 20-something year old hipster with great knees now and a good health insurance plan for future orthopedic consultations. Installing the freewheel helps make it more versatile, ...


35

The gearing of your bike seems reasonable, the 26 front/34 rear combination will (eventually) make climbing hills easy. But till then… Before you do anything else, take @cherouvim's advice and make sure you seat is at a reasonable height. It should be high enough that if you place a heel on the low pedal your leg is almost fully extended (just short of ...


33

I agree with the comments that 9 miles is a not a short ride for somebody not in shape, but you’ll get in shape for it really fast, so you should go for it. Just get ready to be sore in funny places for a couple weeks. You can make your situation better by doing a few things: Buy a road bike instead, assuming you’ll be on pavement. At the very least, ...


26

More than likely it is normal and frankly your legs probably aren't used to it. 17 miles is a long way for a beginner so I would pat yourself on the back for that. You may also benefit from a proper fit from a bike shop. As a lot of beginners either have their seat too high or too low which can limit your power and actually cause you to tire quicker, ...


24

It sounds like you over-exerted yourself and "bonked" – your body ran out of sugar so you fainted. In that case, you reduce the risk by eating more while you ride* and by listening to your body more and backing off when it's getting too much. It may also be blood-pressure related: people with low blood pressure are (as I understand it) more ...


19

You cannot outride (or outrun or out-any-other-exercise) a bad diet. On top of that, decades of research shows it's impossible to "spot-reduce". Your options are: Eat some combination of food that results in fewer calories in. Shoot for somewhere between 200-500 fewer calories for moderate weight loss. Ride some combination of harder and longer while ...


19

Great effort on both the write-up and the commitment to start riding again. Try and separate the issues: Your route was suboptimal due to trusting google Getting off and walking a bike is surprisingly tiring your speed is quite fast for someone who is just coming back to riding after a multi-decade long break You were under time pressure to avoid being late,...


18

In addition to the answer by @Nate, I also commend you for putting in 17 miles after a 24 miles ride. Don't beat yourself up over struggling a little. Be sure you allow plenty of recovery time. You do not get fit exercising, you get fit recovering from exercise. If you do not allow time to fully recover, you will struggle to get fitter. Two days after a ...


17

Just keep on doing the same route and you'll see progress very fast. Also this will soon not be true: It's not so fun on the way back though Some tips to make it: make sure that the tyres are inflated correctly make sure your drivetrain runs smooth and the chain is lubed make sure your seat height is correct (ask your LBS if unsure) conserve energy ...


17

In terms of losing weight immediately, the obvious answer is to use whatever gear combo allows you to produce the greatest energy output. For most people this will likely be a hair lower than the "preferred" range of about 70-90 RPM -- maybe 50-60, and pedaling as hard as you can. However, if you want to KEEP losing weight by getting on the bike again ...


16

A few simple tips: Whether it's cycling, running or any other physical activity the more gradually you build up your mileage, the better off you'll be in the long run. A good rule of thumb is don't increase your time or mileage by more than 10% a week. Carrying on a conversation with someone should be difficult but not impossible. If you can't carry on a ...


16

If you really want to find out, look for a local time trial route and see what people can do on that. There's also an advantage coming up behind someone - not so much the aero advantage as you have to get close for that, but the knowledge that there's someone to catch up with - your head goes into race mode, even just a little, but theirs doesn't. Some ...


15

Wait a little before you buy a new saddle. It takes some time for both your butt and the saddle to adjust to each other. Wider and softer saddles are only more comfortable for shorter rides or very upright riding positions. 17 km and 50 minutes are a very good point to start. Depending on your time constraints and where you live you can either do longer ...


14

This would be a great problem to have for most of us roadies. Simply eat more if you find yourself losing more weight than you care to lose. You can alternatively balance with more strength based exercises like lifts, pulls, rows at the gym or elsewhere. Or cake.


13

If you are riding near your aerobic limit you'll definitely discover that you've lost aerobic capacity during the next 12-24 hours. It can take that long to replace the red blood cells you've lost. Since a blood donation is about 10% of your blood capacity, your aerobic capacity will be down by 10% I wrote the rest of this before I saw your comment that ...


13

As individual speeds vary depending on fitness, bike and conditions, most information on this subject discusses intensity and time spend exercising, rather than distance. Most leisure cyclists ride between 10-18mph (16-30kph) on the road, a bit less off-road. As you can see it's a fairly wide range, so time and intensity are better measures.They can also ...


13

Daniel, what is your actual question? Us strangers on the internet cannot tell you if you are genetically gifted, you must test your biology yourself. I guess the best you can expect from this community is to suggest such tests to you: VO2 max red blood cell count levels of hepatic gluconeogenesis hematocrit level Community members, please add to and edit ...


13

4.1 miles, mostly flat, are on paper doable by any human with two legs in about 90 minutes. Walking. A bicycle? it should be at least 1/3 quicker (although I would expect it to be 3 or 4 times faster than walking). Even a super-heavy dutch bike will allow you to cruise at 8-10 miles per hour, so the distance should take you about half an hour. So it is the ...


12

I've cycled 15km (or 9.3 miles) to work for over 2 years. You'll get used to it very fast. I can reiterate what @tim.farkas is saying about that wearing a backpack will get old fast. I've bolted a big plastik box onto my bike rack to put my backpack in. It was very relieving to cycle without anything on your back. Take your time in the beginning and cycle ...


11

Depends on exercise intensity. In a day or two you can return to your normal/moderate exercise. A complete recovery of oxygen delivery can take as much as 3/4 weeks. This means a professional athlete should be careful because he will loose performance, but us normal human beings can carry our normal daily lives. You can read more complete answerers given ...


11

If you really want to measure how much effort you're putting in, you should look into getting a power meter. It measures the actual wattage you output, and can therefore be used to calculate total energy output. However, they are quite expensive. The other option is to get a heart rate monitor along with cadence and speed meters which together can give you ...


11

No - Struggling away in the small rear cog/large front chainring combo is bad. Fitness is an overall term that has many components, so: If you want power you need to work on intervals, which is as fast as possible at full power for short burst times, then recovery time at a middling state. If you want to train for endurance, being at the steady state for ...


11

This is an updated form of my answer, partially in response to the other answers. It is you, not the bike. The bike may be a bit of a tough, perhaps over-ambitious choice, but it is in principle ok for the task. Many of the other answers argued that a singlespeed drop-bar bike is fundamentally not suited for a city commute. I disagree. Such a bike can be ...


10

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


10

There are no shortcuts, it's about building the legs, and lungs, and body. There may be some factors that could make it a little easier, but the main factor is getting strong enough, which takes some time and some dedication. Starting in the easiest gear may not be the best choice as it can make a climb seem endless. Try to get into the hill at good speed, ...


10

Most trials bicycles are designed without a seat. However, they are likely to be uncomfortable when ridden for long distances. You may want to consider what what you mean by "stay fit". Fitness must have goals to be obtainable. Cycling is generally consider to be cardio exercise that improves aerobic fitness. Standing while cycling is more of a strength ...


10

You can get a trials bike. They often do not have a saddle or seatpost, by design. They are meant for doing tricks, jumps, balancing, etc. This doesn't sound like what you are doing but if you must not have a saddle, or post, this might be an option for you. This is what they look like: You might want to just use a regular bike and stand up instead as it ...


10

Get a power meter or borrow a bike with one. Bicycling is all about power in relation to your body weight and aerodynamics. Measuring your watts per kg will answer your question. Don’t just measure your maximum power (sprint) but measure at least a 20 minute effort. There are a lot of reasons why seemingly fit riders might ride slow: Easy training ride, ...


10

Despite their already being multiple good answers I am going to post this because I think each answer has good points but it is useful to have them in one place. I agree with everyone who said a single speed bike is a significant source of your problems. Even a three speed internal hub would have been much better for you. As your fitness improves you will ...


10

Both. You really, really, really don't want a bike without gears. In the city you'll rarely ride at the optimal speed for that transmission; instead you need to stop and start frequently and adapt to flow with the traffic which is much easier if you can switch gears. Try to sell yours as long as you can advertise it as "practically unused" and buy ...


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