10

If you cannot control the rear cog's position, you can try moving the front chainring to tune the chain tension. That is, get an eccentric bottom bracket: By rotating it in the frame, the distance between rear and front cogs can be tuned. The same idea is achieved by eccentric rear hubs, e.g. White Ind. Eno: The hub choices below offer those of you ...


10

The short answer, is you generally cannot make a fixie out of a frame with vertical dropouts. Not only do you need to tension the chain, but the spacing of the axle of the bottom bracket and rear wheel varies, depending on your selection of cog and chainring tooth counts. Adjusting tooth counts will allow you to try to fine adjust the spacing, but it won't ...


9

A torque specification is not just a torque-spanner setting but a physical property. That is, there are many ways to apply the correct torque. In this case it means more or less: pull it as tight as you could. One can conclude this from the high torque value and wide torque range. To illustrate this let's find the force F you need to apply to a tool to get ...


6

Different from the other answer, I read the question as OP wanting to change to lower gear ratio without changing chain length. 52/15 is an extremely high ratio. For all practical purposes, if you want to keep the chain length same, the sum of numbers of teeth in cog and ring should stay the same. The changing geometry does affect the result a bit, but ...


5

The axle (the object on your picture) does not define which types of cogs can be used. It is the hub that rotates around that axle that determines it. The flip-flop hub of the wheel you are linking to is designed to take a single speed freewheel (used also on BMX and some single speed city bicycles) on one side and a fixed cog on another side. It is not ...


5

Sprockets are wear parts anyway so just replace. Welding would be relatively expensive and I strongly suspect it would damage the heat treatment state of the steel.


4

This won't necessarily help the OP, but it may help other riders in a similar situation. Stack and reach defined First, let's review what stack and reach are. Stack and reach are usually measured to the top of the bike's head tube. Here's an article by Road.cc, and a picture from their article. Basically, reach is how long the bike is (i.e. the horizontal ...


4

One solution might be to add a larger 5mm spacer on the axle, between the outside of the cone-nut and the inside of the locknut. The risks here are that your axle may suffer from bending easier because its now supporting the bike's weight further out. Also, you'll probably need a longer axle too because the track wheels are unlikely to have much spare. ...


4

It looks a lot like a Masi Speciale Fixed LTD This is a picture of a 2010 model Link to the 2010 catalog Link to the Masi catalog page


4

MTB vee brakes have a different pull ratio than road caliper pull ratio. They make specific levers for each. I've used normal mtb vee levers on road bikes before and it was fine, when I used the brakes, it just felt like it stopped with small amounts of movement of the lever. So modulation wasn't great. But it worked. Alternatively, you could use "cross ...


3

Since you are buying new parts anyway why not just get the correct levers. We are talking about brakes and it is important that they work at their best not pretty good. The levers you need will be described as cantilever brake compatible. There are even models with two cable anchor points so they can be used with both canti or linear pull.


3

When the torque is only specified in Newton-meters I have to consult a reference, but for foot-pounds, that's the number of pounds of pressure you'd put on a one-foot lever. For the above wrench, measure it -- I'm guessing it's about 6 inches long (probably a hair less, since you'd measure from the center of the nut, not to the end of the wrench). So you'd ...


3

Like most bicycle components cartridge bottom brackets are highly standardized. Almost all bikes with threaded bottom bracket shells are ISO standard: 1.37inch x 24 threads per inch, drive side is left hand threaded. The ISO standard is also known as 'English' or 'BSA'. Obviously this is what your frame has. There are two other parameters you need to know. ...


3

No, this conversion isn't possible. The 130 version has a different shell than the 120. The flanges are further apart. That's the good way for them to have done it, because if they had used the same flange spacing throughout, that's wasting lateral strength on everything but the 120. If you look at your hub you'll see that there's not really anything you can ...


3

why dont you want to change the chain? you need to get used to fact, that each change of cog is also a change of chain/chain length. just order 18 or 19 tooth cog and new chain and you will end with 52/18=2,9 or 52/19=2,7 much more comfortable ratio for day to day travels just for comparision, 3,5 ratio is extremly hard/heavy ratio. even not all track ...


2

Based on the photo from your link, this bike will be difficult to convert because of the dropout having no adjustment at all. Effectively this means you will need some other way of tensioning the chain. Eccentric bottom bracket (expensive) Chain tensioner (looks like a derailleur) This also means you cannot use fixed gear, because the chain will go slack ...


2

In the 70s and 80s a lot of (mostly cheaper) road bikes were built with the same length top tubes all throughout the size run, usually in the 57-59mm range. They worked really badly for a lot of people but they might help here, especially since they all have horizontal dropouts. Other than that, the cheap option is probably a long stem, and the good one is ...


2

Top preference would be a replacement. These cogs are not expensive. A second idea - It looks symmetrical, so I'd suggest using a small file to blend any burrs or daggy bits that might catch the chain, and then just flip it over so the "miche" branding is on the opposite side. That way the wear will be on the back of the curve, and you can get ...


2

There is no 1 standard square tapered bottom bracket axle length for track frames. The crankset dictates the bb axle length, it's not as varied as with crankset with gears, but there is more than one. The range is much smaller than with gears, track bb axle lengths mostly go from 103mm - 112mm (there are smaller and longer for less common cranksets). I think ...


1

Very hard to tell - Masi have used a relatively "traditional" frame design. Masi made a bunch of frames with trackends for the fixed/single speed market, so theres a chance this was one-speed from new. The pedals don't have foot retention, so I'd be leaning to originally a single speed rather than fixed gear. The visible components aren't showing ...


1

You can use cross top levers without the main lever with some hacking. There is a thread about it here: https://www.bikeforums.net/singlespeed-fixed-gear/108969-how-install-inline-brake-lever-primary.html You can also replace it with a 'normal' brake lever. If your bar is oversize (31.8 mm) it can be hard to find a brake lever that fits, but it's certainly ...


1

BSA 68 is the bottom bracket shell type. BSA determines the threads an shell length, so this needs to match the frame, so it should be the same as old BB. 107 is axle length. This is determined by the crankset, so you need to find the specs for the crankset you want and take the number there. Track bikes have standard chainline, so unless you want to ...


1

Campag toolboxes used to have a tool, looked like a satin chromed steel bar, that was to be placed on the right side of the BB and swung to the left inside of the right frame end. If it didn't just brush nicely, the stays were out of whack. Triple check your BB/cog alignment. All need to be in plane. An aligned chain wheel can't ship the chain off an aligned ...


1

I do a lot of single speed and fixed gear cycling, and if the geography in your area is relatively flat, that 40 t ring you have might be perfect with a cog between 15 and 18 t, depending on how strong your riding is or how much potential speed you might want to achieve. If you plan on a long ride or maintaining a particular average speed, your ratio will ...


1

Yes, to the first approximation you need to keep the total number of teeth the same in order to use the same chain on the same base. Think of it this way: to keep the same distance between the crankshaft (bottom bracket) and the rear axle, by definition you need the same number of 'free' (disengaged) links; or more accurately, the same number of links ...


1

In addition to Criggie's answer... Also consider removing the two chainrings you are not using (you may need shorter chainring bolts as one set go through the middle and outer rings.) The usual configuration would be retaining the middle ring and removing the inner small and outer large rings, however as you will be using a single speed conversion kit you ...


1

I believe there can be an issue with play in GXP cranks. The play in the bearings is taken up by the non drive side crank arm sliding up along the splined taper as the bolt is done up and compressing the wave washer in the drive side. The bolt can be tightened up to the correct torque but there is still lateral play. Definitely check you have the spacers ...


1

Maybe it has something to do with momentum. Imagine the wheels like a fly wheel in a car. The larger the wheel, the more momentum it has, so maybe once you get the large wheel turning, it is easier to keep it going at high speed.


1

In a little late on this forum question, but I’ve experienced this problem on a few aluminum frames that have stainless steel dropout sleeves. Your frame is likely using a stainless steel dropout. The stainless is as hard or harder than the axle nuts which prevents them from biting into the metal. The only solution is to abrade the dropout surface with ...


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