8

You can just use the freewheel on the large thread on the fixed side. It's the same size, and just as durable as the freewheel side, for normal people. So just unscrew the lockring and cog, and put on a standard freewheel of your choice. Did it as a bike messenger, and it still holds to this day. Happy riding!


8

You can buy a flip hub rear wheel where one side is fixed, the other free (Some bikes even come with them). You just take the wheel off, flip sides and put it back on. Brakes will depend on the frame but most frames allow for the installation of brakes. For the rear brake, you'll just have run full cable housing along the frame with either wire ties or cable ...


6

If it's wobbling side to side, there are two problems that are possible; Your cup-and-cone bearings could be loose or your wheel could be out of true (slightly buckled.) Take your wheel off and hold the axle. Wobble it up and down a few times. There should be absolutely no movement besides the spinning it's meant to be doing. If this is wobbling, just ...


6

As a follow up, I actually did put the freewheel on the fixed gear side (after some cleaning). As you can see from the pictures, the freewheel won't be all the way threaded (like my LBS said) but it feels secure enough. As far as tools required: Freewheel remover of some kind Chain whip / Lockring remover


5

Yes, you can get all the cheap cup and cone fixed/single-speed hubs and wheels you want. The hubs are still mass produced (unless they made so many during the fixed gear craze that they're still coasting off that, but I digress) and used as OEM on bikes and aftermarket wheels. Examples would be the Formula TH31 (fix/free) and TH32 (fix/fix) and Joytech ...


5

If the thread fits, there would be no problem. The nature of the mechanical stresses over the hub during traction would be identical (only there would not be the backpedal component, but that means less stress, not more).


4

Being a flip flop hub this is easier than it might be otherwise, because flip flop hubs, like rim brake front hubs, are pretty much universally spaced to build a dishless wheel. If that's true, all you need to do is configure the spacers so that the flanges are equidistant from the locknut faces. Once you've figured out which spacers go on which side, the ...


4

The nut in the orange circle is what you need to remove on either side of the hub, there should be no use for a hammer in this application. Simply use an adjustable wrench on either side and remove counter clockwise. The yellowish green arrow points to a tensioner screw, which helps to tension the chain and properly space the axle in the dropout so that it ...


4

A tire that fits an internal rim width of between 17mm and 23mm wide. Searching for bicycle tire width rim guide will get you more information. So anything from 700 by 17mm internal width, to 700 by 23mm internal width will suit you. If you think you likely use skinner tires in the future, stick to the smaller end of the range. If you think you'll go wide,...


3

Flipflop disc brake hubs don't exist. If you were willing to ride without a rear brake, you could switch the existing wheel back and fourth by using a bolt-on track cog. I believe they give a chainline in the 41-42mm range. This plan would however be asking for trouble if you were using a hydraulic brake, since it wouldn't have its rotor in place to prevent ...


3

As @Nate Wengert says that screw is for adjusting chain tension. It pokes into the axle slot and prevents the axle from moving forward. It does not attach the axle or hub to the frame in any way. It sounds like you just need a bit more torque to get the axle nuts undone. If you cannot apply enough torque with a full size wrench, a short length of ...


3

Any 700C or non-plus 29er wheel will be able to physically mount it, but there's then the consideration of rim width relative to tire width. Rims for road bikes are usually 20-21mm wide or so measured across the outside. You ideally want something more like a hybrid/touring or XC wheel for a tire that size, with an outside width of 22-25mm.


2

Yeah it will work without issue. Humans would have to generate far more torque than we are capable of to actually pull the threads off of the hub. If you think about it, if it's enough threads for a track cog then there's no reason it wouldn't be enough for a freewheel. Due to the smaller amount of engagement on a fixed thread the mechanical stresses would ...


2

Yes, you need to buy a freewheel. It's almost certainly a standard one so you can go into any LBS and grab whatever they have. The main thing to know is that it should screw on easily by hand. If it doesn't you've either not got the thread started properly, or the thread is the wrong size. Ideally put a tiny bit of grease on it so it'll come off more ...


1

The critical measurements are that you have to match the rim diameter to your brakes, and the width of your hub to whatever your frame needs. A 27" wheel may be several different sizes. Its best to use the ETRTO number which is 622-xx for a 700c wheel and 630-xx or 635-xx are nominal 27 inch. So your existing tyre/tube will fit because the new wheel's rim ...


1

I get that too. My bike is about three weeks old so it has Nil to do with bike age. I remedied by using teflon chain wax / lube. May pay to see if it's the pedals or the chain / derailers are all in good nick. Sometimes when a bike has not been ridden for sometime it needs a service or at least a inspection just like a car.


1

To quote the page you linked, "Since the Velosteel hub has standard track threads, it can run any fixie/track cog built to Phil Wood/Campagnolo standards." For cogs, this is the same standard as every other cog, but the lock ring will probably be different. Just take the cog from your old hub and keep the lock ring from new one. Note that this is different ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible