30

It seems that this dent belongs in the bike. Here is a photo of a similar bike. While image is of low quality, the dent is visible: However, as pointed out by Lamar Latrell in comments, in your second photo the weld to the headtube has a dark spot in it. I cannot tell from the photo, but you or your bike mechanic should check if it is a damage in the weld ...


21

If it is damage then no one here can say for sure how it happened. However, it's in the realm of impossible-ish for a dent that severe to happen without paint damage or a clear mark in the paint from whatever did it. It sure looks like it's there intentionally to buy clearance for the steering mast when folded. If folding the bike up corroborates this, ...


21

The 'noodle' (the curved silver tube the brake cable passes through) has slipped through the holder on the right-hand (in your picture) brake caliper. The noodle is designed to come out of the holder to spread the calipers to enable the wheel to be taken out. The proper configuration looks like this: Squeeze the calipers together and free the noodle from ...


18

Yes, I've used a variety of folding pedals on my Dahon and Brompton and they're all a bit flexy. I've had plastic ones snap in half on me (and yes, that can be very painful/dangerous). The best ones I've had were all-metal ones in which the axle and folding pedal were both metal. But even those aren't as strong as fixed pedals -- and none of the folding ...


16

I think you'll find that the handlebar 'stem' folds to the left, and will line up with the dent when folded. If the dent is not supposed to be there, my best guess is that the handlebar was folded then, pressed into the frame, perhaps be the wheel and fork being forcibly turned to the left. The dent just does not look like it's accidental. There are no ...


13

In my opinion, this should NOT be done. Bicycles are very versatile, and one can not only use a single all-purpose bike for many purposes, but also to have/design specialty bikes, as it is the case of a Strida. And, by the way, is the case with a lot of child-carrying specific bikes and/or equipment. But, as it seems to me, a Strida is a SPECIALTY BIKE NOT ...


13

Great question! I think the market drives this -- not necessarily just the folding bike market, but the component market. Mountain bikes have been the predominant type of bicycle for the past thirty years. This has meant that every manufacturer has a line for very, very inexpensive mountain bike componentry. If you want to build up a bike on the cheap, ...


12

My stable contains two folding bikes, and I love them both. I use them for different purposes. If this is going to be your only bike and you want to use that bike for cargo (with racks, etc), I recommend against using a folding bike unless it's one with larger wheels. Disadvantages of folders: For offroad riding, nothing beats a standard rigid-frame ...


11

Well, from an engineering standpoint, no. It increases complexity, cost and weight. Those might be a deal breaker for the commuters who would likely use them. From a practical standpoint, maybe. @NL_Derek; you could be the first to test one! In conjunction with other folding components (frame like a Dahon & pedals), it may suit the users need, imagine ...


10

To add to Michael's comment if it's your property you can't be forbid to bring a bicycle into your apartment, unless it's somehow unlawful to be in possession of said bicycle. Would you be forbid to bring a crank set or a pair of wheels or a bar set into your apartment? Why would you be forbid to bring those things assembled in a certain way into your ...


9

Auto-Mini folding bikes Auto-Mini folding bikes were made by the Austrian corporation Steyr-Daimler-Puch AG in the early 1970s; the bikes were usually sold in department stores. (Folding Cyclist, 2016.) In North America, vendors included J.C. Penney, Montgomery-Ward, and Simpsons-Sears. (thebikeguy, 2007; Martin, 1996; Thomas, 2011b; cf. Bikeworks, c. 1998.)...


8

Not sure if there is a tradition term for these. At the time of writing I found Some products simply called cable splitters or separators and Ritchey quick disconnectors


8

Your best bet would be to contact the manufacturer for specifications or even replacement parts. Failing that, your next best thing should be to measure/learn parameters of your current shock, and then finding another ones that matches closely these parameters. What you need to measure/find out are: Eye-to-eye length Stroke length Mounting hardware used to ...


8

A further thing to watch out for when following Argenti's (correct) advice: Check the end of the noodle holder very carefully. I've seen some old, cheap V brakes in which this was too soft and opened up allowing the noodle to slip through in a similar way to the photos in the question, when you squeeze the brakes very hard. Here's a sketch of the end of ...


7

Road-bike specific components are designed for weight not strength. MTBs are expected to survive rougher handling. Although folding bikes don't want to be heavy, they need to be tough, often getting knocked over onto drivetrain components, or bumped into doorframes, etc. Other bikes built for mainly on-road use but not top speeds also share components with ...


6

If you go with one of the bigger, more solid folding bikes you can use a standard child seat. With most smaller-folding bikes you'll run into weight limits even if you can get one to fit - they're often only rated for 90kg or so, which means that even a light 60kg adult and a 10kg child doesn't leave a lot of margin for "it wasn't designed for this" stresses....


6

There no bike on the market that is very good at folding and also very good at “biking”! So you have to decide if you care most about the folding or how well it works as a bike. For a bike to fold into a small space it must have small wheels. Small wheels are never as good a ride as full sized wheels. The Brompton is consider to be one of the best ...


6

The factors that affect bike efficiency are: Weight Mechanical power train Losses Aerodynamic Drag Rolling resistance For a touring bike, the difference between a folding and regular bike are all lost in the noise. Smaller wheels tend to have higher rolling resistance and the bike might be a bit heavier, but for touring it just doesn't matter that much. ...


6

Running through a quick list of "engineering considerations" that I've just made up: costThese will cost more to design, test, manufacture and assemble at point of sale than conventional handlebars. They're more complex, so I can't see any way around the extra cost. The benefit seems to be slim outside of some fairly specialised scanarios, and for many of ...


6

There are at least four factors involved: 1. Tire pressure The thinner the tire, the higher pressure it requires, and the higher pressures it can handle. More pressure means less deformation, and less deformation means less energy loss. Road bikes typically have very thin tires that allow pressures around 10bar, if I'm not much mistaken (you can look that ...


6

Yes, a Tern Spartan Front Rack does fit on a BikeFriday New World Tourist (and also the Tern Cargo rear rack): To prevent the rack from interfering with the V-brakes I mounted the upper end of the rack (and the fender) on a 80mm screw. Behind the fork I inserted 4x6mm spacer (the thinner in diameter the better) to mount the rack before the V-brakes (yes, ...


5

I'd recommend getting a cheap used aluminum frame bike (a beater), a good lock, and a bottle of oil. Then, I recommend you lock it on the street most of the time. I recommend cheap so that you won't worry about it while it's parked on the street. I recommend aluminum so that it is light enough to haul up to your apartment for those extended periods when ...


5

If you have an old inner tube available cut a section slightly longer than your seatpost. Slip it over the seat post and zip tie it in place. It will act as a somewhat water/dirt resistant boot, similar to what mountain bikes have on the front shocks. You may have to look for a fairly wide tube to fit over the post. Check with your local shop to see if they ...


5

At the time the question was asked, there were no 16" studded bike tyres. Now, however, there are: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/pressereader/spikes-for-birdy-and-brompton.html But unfortunately there are two different 16" rim sizes, and the new Schwalbes are 349mm (as used by Brompton), and 16" Dahon is 305mm. It might be possible to fit a Brompton sized ...


5

As with any critical fastener on a bike, the vibration and flexing forces from riding will eventually work threaded parts loose. Normally this is the sort of thing that occurs over a few months--not every week. Fortunately, there are a few options that are applicable to this and any other situation where threads work themselves loose. (Before you do anything,...


5

If you're only using it for riding a bit around town, possibly using multi-modal train or bus connections (they are popular with London tube riders), small shopping trips, or commuting to work and you are not concerned about doing fast road rides, off road riding, or super long rides then a folding bike could be a good fit. I borrowed a folding bike and ...


5

A good folding bike should ride just as well and last just long as a traditional bike. BikeFriday has a reputation for bikes that feel "normal." As far as maintenance goes there is very little difference. From my experience the only thing that needs more frequent maintenance are the cable housings. This is because cables usually have to make more complex ...


5

In my experience, it seems fairly standard practice for the tenancy agreements supplied by agents to forbid the storage of bikes in properties. I have always just done so regardless, though I can understand why you might want to avoid clearly violating the terms of your agreement. I'm fairly sure that your landlord (unless they are live-in) is required to ...


5

Looks like there's something missing. The golden piece should go around the top of the black piece of the frame, and should clamp it tight without the two edges touching by the threadded bolt. The silver piece looks like a shim or a spacer of some sort, and the seat and seatpole/post has not been pictured, but would go inside the silver tube. Is there a ...


5

Flying with a Brompton [as a carryon] is typically dependent on the airport staff and flight crew, rather than airline policies and procedures. I've had success getting the bike on larger planes no problem, mostly because overhead compartments were very large, or because there was sufficient space to store the folded bike (with seat and pedals removed) with ...


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