New answers tagged

9

What’s happened here is that you have expanded the diameter of the top of the seat tube, in the process it looks like you have made some small cracks on the top edge, and created a number of burrs. That’s why the original seat post clamp will not fit anymore. The larger clamp obviously does not work as its diameter is too large to clamp down on the tube with ...


2

When you speak about "upgraded over time" I think you mostly mean "ages well". Every time I buy a bicycle I want to make sure that it stays up to date for as much time as possible. And I try to sell it before the technology behind it gets out of date. The scope narrows down to the frame, pretty much, but components are also important, as ...


0

If your components are in good working order and are actually worth keeping then there are only a few measurements you need to worry about.1 frame size,2 headtube length and diameter 3,bottom bracket type and dropout spacing ,4 maybe seatpost diameter but you can buy shims to make your old post fit.Its not hard .I switch components between all my bikes.very ...


3

I found a nice product that is a roll of shiny black tape that reflects very brightly at night and would just look like a faint black stripe on your black frame when not reflecting. It works during the day too. It can be applied to any part of the frame, cut to shape, applied to your helmet, etc. That being said, being visible is dependent on so many factors ...


0

Studies have shown that wearing hi-viz colours, particularly on moving extremities such as one's feet I have a better idea. Let's move the hi-viz colours from the feet to the pedals, so that you don't need to choose your clothes based on having hi-viz colours. Let's also make the hi-viz colours retroreflective, i.e. all of the light shining on them is ...


0

Best solution is to find some velcro strapped cage mount. Dissimilar metals touching each other can cause ionic corrosion due to electrolysis, especially in humid weather, rain, salty conditions. I live in San Diego, USA, 1/4 mile (400m) from a bay and 4 miles (6.5km) from ocean spray and my aluminum window frames have 1/2 inch (12.7mm) holes in those ...


4

It wouldn’t make much difference from the rear. All a driver could see from the rear is the top of your seat stays, which aren’t very large. Same goes for the front. From the side, it would make more of a difference, but I wouldn’t say it’s significant enough to justify the fancy paint job. Of course, if you like the way the fancy paint looks as well, that ...


3

It looks a lot like this 1998 Zephyr Boardwalk 6 BikePedia The Boardwalk also came in a single speed. Both bikes came in men's and ladies models. Sorry about the bad picture, I looked for better ones. The "Zephyr" brand was also used to on BMX bicycles. On the linked BMX bike the logo is similar and there is a "MANUFACTURED EXCLUSIVELY FOR S....


1

I think you'll find that the second most difficult component of a bicycle to change is a wheel hub (unless changing the entire wheel obviously). This means if you are interested in for example dynamo hub lighting system, you should try to find it as stock hub in an existing bicycle. The most difficult component of a bicycle to change is the frame. Changing a ...


1

I'm just going to point out some minor things the other answers have missed. The original question correctly pointed that you may be unable to change the wheel size, and you certainly can't go from small to big wheels because there won't be room. You will also change the handling in ways you didn't expect. Many gravel bikes are designed to accept 700c and ...


1

The problem I see with this line of questioning is that it assumes the existence of some ideal perfect bike that has every conceivable upgrade on it. Then you are measuring a bike you're considering buying against that ideal with the idea that you could upgrade part-by-part until you have the ideal. That just doesn't exist because bikes are built for ...


3

The bicycle's serial number is usually found under the bottom bracket. if you regard the serial number as equivalent to the VIN number on a car, then changing the frame makes it a new bike.


13

Any and every part of a bicycle can be replaced, including the frame. (Many people would probably regard a different frame as a different bicycle though.) You ask whether there are components that 'cannot be upgraded'. I think you are misusing that word. Anything can be upgraded, i.e. replaced with a equivalent but better quality version. I think what you ...


14

Certain parts of a bicycle are more easily upgradeable than others, while other types of upgrades require special tools, much more money investments or are limited to whatever standards are used in its design. For some parts, the opportunity of an upgrade coincides with the older part being worn out; in other cases, the replacement is not warranted by this ...


1

Adding this answer to a years old question that is very relevant today. Most new forks today (mid- to high-level ones from the biggest and best suspension makers, namely: Fox, Rock-Shox, XFusion, Marzocchi [owned by Fox], Manitou, Ohlins) are equipped with tapered steer tubes 1.5" at the crown to 1.125" by the time it leaves the headtube and the ...


1

Q1: If it not then is there a possibility to get injured? A1: Too low saddle height will usually hurt knees and it is the first element to adjust. It should be no pain or soar or any uncomfortable to go riding bicycle. And, if you feel any uncomfortable, it is then a signal to check and examine. If you feel that, you can ask your physican or post the issues ...


3

I am roughly your size (same inseam 5'8") and 52cm for a "standard" diamond frame bike would be too small for me. With a long enough stem I could get the bars in roughly the right place, but it they would likely be too low without some serious bogdery with stem riser extensions. But if you're young and flexible enough to deal with the low bar ...


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