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-2

Actually a lot of bikes are a mixture of Cr-Mo front triangles (TT/DT/ST) and Hi-ten rear seat stays and chain stays. These are called (Tri-Moly). Reason is simple, Cr-Mo although stronger does flex more than steel, so by using stiffer Hi-Ten for the rear SS & CS's this transmits the riders power more efficiently because the rear end isn't flexing under ...


-1

Is it feasible to repair a crack in a frame around the seatpost clamp? Being an aluminium frame I understand soldering is problematic This is very typical of aluminum frames and in fact is the reason why I don't recommend aluminum frames (and forks) to be used. Instead, double butted chromium molybdenum steel (chromoly) wouldn't have this problem. Aluminum ...


-1

It IS possible to repair this. It is possible to repair practically EVERYTHING that is man-made. Although it is impossible to say how cost-effective or how easy it will be by just looking at a couple of pictures, I would be confident that this frame could be repaired well and fairly cheaply. Yes, I'm one of those that hate the throw-away society we've ...


4

That looks to be the logo of Redline bicycles: https://www.redlinebicycles.com


10

The decimal sizes such as 25.4 and 28.6mm are not "unusual" sizes. They are actually the standard sizes. You can count on engineers to do the easy and cheap thing, so they use the standard sizes. "Standard metric size" tubing (that would presumably be sizes in a round number of millimeters like 25mm or 30mm) is not really a thing in the ...


5

Summary You can ride it as is if you are okay with the risk, repair it with carbon fibre composite either yourself or get it done by a professional, or you can have a professional repair it by welding. Risk analysis of riding it as is: Has been like that for a long time and didn't break: That's really one of the strongest and easiest to verify arguments: ...


8

To be clear, I would not recommend riding that frame as-is. The clamps of the kickstand probably added rigidity, by removing it the bike will be weaker. If one or both chainstays part then handling will change abruptly, dropping the pedals and BB down toward the road and putting a lot of stress on the chainstays which will bend immediately. The chain ...


10

The only thing that can be done to save the frame is to have patches welded over the holes. You would need the expertise of a professional welder to get it done properly so that the frame is made structurally sound. Unfortunately, you may find that this repair is more expensive than simply finding a similar replacement bike or frame. The welding repair job ...


1

You can measure this information yourself sooner than discover it here or elsewhere. When I've done the same thing on bikes I've noticed how little information manufacturers provide on things like this, I wish they gave more info. You need to measure the fork steerer diameter at the top and at the bottom where the crown race seats, as well as the inner ...


4

Kickstands historically mount to the underside of both chainstays, just aft of the bottom bracket. Many bike frames incorporate a stiffener plate here, with a large bolthole for a stand. You do not need this stiffener plate for a stand. Example: This stand clearly clamps an upper and lower plate around the chainstays and you can see the stiffener aft of ...


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