New answers tagged

2

Size charts and your existing bikes provide no more than a rough guide, as geometry varies between manufacturers and models and has changed over the years. Top tube length, along with stem length as well as saddle position and seat tube angles all play their part in fitting a bike correctly. I would not rely on the comfortable fit of any bike you currently ...


9

I'll weigh in as the single person in this thread who actually seems to have ridden, and owned, multiple Vituses. I love them, always have, mainly for their history, their gorgeous looks, their light weight. I ride my current one in blue daily, as a city bike, have for several years. As a relatively inexpensive mid-range frame, it handles nimbly, and the ...


2

This is not a full answer, but I don't have enough reputation to leave a comment. There is one more thing that you may want to consider when making this choice, and that is a resale value of the bike. For the vintage bike, if 300 euros is a reasonable price for that particular model today (which I don't know and you'd have to find out elsewhere), then it's ...


1

There are objective and subjective criteria to help you in making this decision. Some criteria may be more or less important to you. Probably not a complete list Objective Criteria Wear and tear - Without a teardown you can't see lubrication and bearing surface wear on the old bike but you can get a feel for miles and care by looking at the bike. Pulling ...


6

If I were buying a vintage frame (and assuming that it fits), I would generally be more inclined to buy a steel one. I'm not a vintage expert, but the Vitus 979 appears to be an early aluminum frame. In theory, aluminum has a finite fatigue life, whereas steel, titanium, and carbon do not (assuming equal quality control on the materials and frame ...


22

Although I support keeping older bikes in circulation in general, this particular bike comes with some caveats. One of my riding buddies had a very similar bike. The Vitus 979 is a bonded aluminum frame with small-diameter tubes. It was notoriously flexible when new. It was rumored that Sean Kelly, who raced on one of these, had to replace his fork after ...


12

Depends what is your goal, but personally, I'd go for the modern one. Maybe for this budget, you can find something second hand with Shimano 105, that would be also an option. The reasons are: weight is a secondary concern, unless you are in competition and are looking for 1/10th of seconds. Don't forget that the weight that matters is the total weight (...


-2

I'd be highly suspicious of old super-lightweight bikes, especially if they have a high mileage history. A rugged equipped bike for touring use (u-lock, hub dynamo, lights, reflectors, mudguards, rack, kickstand) with technology that was available in 1980s (and still is today) weighs about 15 kg. Of this, about 4 kg are the accessories so 11 kg is the base ...


-1

Nukeproof warranty covers the original purchaser from defects in materials, paint and workmanship from the original purchase date for a period as listed below (for the nukeproof mega in question): Nukeproof Frames = 5 Years (2016-CURRENT, excluding Downhill products) Nukeproof Components = 2 Years Carbon handlebars = lifetime Nukeproof Ti Bearing HZN Headset ...


0

Are you the first owner of the bike? If it had another owner, then that owner could have forced a wrong wheel with a hub with wider OLD (over the locknut distance). Howe reputable is the shop you've bought the bicycle from? If it is a good one, you could pay them a visit and ask about your concerns, it should not cost anything. If you are certain that the ...


8

Most likely this is normal design. Although more common in aluminum than in steel, tubes that don't run straight are common. Since both sides are a same, the only possibility this is caused by an impact with for example a car, is that a car hit with same force the bicycle twice, once from each side (besides, you seem to have a rear rack that would first be ...


0

It is weldable, but it will probably be expensive because not too many companies are experienced in welding Aluminum. Another option would be to place something strong around the damaged part, like the cast for a broken limb. I would just keep riding it if I couldn't fix it. The issue is almost certainly caused by vibrations. The rack was certified for a ...


0

This might be repairable, if a technique used on airplanes works on bikes. To begin with, I just want to emphasize that I don't have any particular experience with bicycle repair, so I might be wrong. However, I do have some training in aircraft maintenance and repair - and in aircraft, if there is a significant dent, crack, or hole in the airplane's ...


12

Unfortunately the frame is now scrap. I would not ride it. The jagged edges of the hole will not help, it will induce a stress riser and the frame will crack. The question when, not if. You will almost certainly be unsuccessful with a warranty claim on the frame (although you have nothing to loose trying), the reason the braze ons failed is they were ...


4

You've bought it this year! In that case it is surely still covered by warranty, even though you've bought it from a third person. Contact the dealer and let them have a look before undertaking any attempt on repair.


6

That's pretty bad. No one here can tell you the risk of it actually breaking. What can be said is that it were to ever break, odds are it would happen at some outlier moment of extreme stress on the frame, such as unintentionally hitting a bump on a fast descent. What I would not do is make any assumptions that in any scenario where it broke, you'd get ...


15

The chainstay has been crimped (at the time of manufacture) to provide extra clearance for the chain rings. On some bikes, I’ve seen this clearance provided by having the bottom-bracket end of the chainstay be a solid plate (thinner than the chainstay tube). The bike almost certainly came with a multi-gear crankset when new.


1

One trick is to look for the price of similar new bicycle. By searching in the internet for "Ficarius" "te koop" and similar words, you will find easily that a very similar model can be bought new for https://www.promobutler.be/fr/promotions/velo-de-ville-ficarius-molecule-2747268 159 Euro. At this price point, the new bicycle is ...


4

That does not look good. It looks to be the very top of the head tube that is unsupported by the headset race on the inside. Things to try: Give the area a good hard squeeze with your hand. No head tube should flex at all with mere hand pressure. If you can feel it deforming, immediately stop riding this frame. Try getting the bike's rider to sit on the ...


9

That is bad news. It's too clean looking and parallel to the headtube top face to be at all likely to be a random scratch. It looks like a defect with the headtube. Even if it were a scratch, it would be a deep one in one of the more highly stressed areas of the bike. It looks like something that should be resolved either via warranty or carbon repair.


7

One rule of thumb for identifying higher quality frames is the type of dropouts on the frame. Generally, a frame with forged dropouts will be of higher quality than a frame with stamped drop outs. Stamped dropouts are made just like the name sounds - they are stamped out of inexpensive sheet metal. They are fast and cheap to produce. Forged dropouts ...


2

How can I tell whether this Ficarius frame is cheaper in quality compared to say a Peugeot frame? Usually high quality frames specify the type of tubing used. For example Reynolds, Columbus, Tange or today increasingly often generic 4130 chromium molybdenum steel. Also the label that specifies the type of steel probably also specifies whether the steel is ...


7

I would say that what you ask is an ability acquired with time and practice. It is difficult to "teach" by words alone. And yes, one frame can have a very different ride characteristic when compared to another. I'd say that besides raw material and craftsmanship quality, bike geometry and proper fit play a major role in how comfortable you feel ...


3

HH does imply "haro" as a brand. A photo might help confirm that. The serial number is useless for identification, unless you know the brand, AND that brand kept records, AND they've been published somewhere. See What is the purpose of a serial number? Discussions of value are considered off-topic because they change all the time, and are highly ...


6

Short answer: No. Bike manufacturers are certainly aware of the QC issues inherent in the carbon fiber manufacturing process and ways to both test for and mitigate them, and it is also true that for VIP's (i.e. flagship athletes) and during product development, a very small selection of VIP frames will receive additional scrutiny beyond the normal QC process ...


4

I'm not really familiar with the bicycle production process, but in the case of motorhome manufacturing (Winnebago), two identical bare chassis come in the door on one end, and by the time they reach the exit door, one may be a $100,000 plain Jane, while the other chassis has been adorned such that the asking price has reached 175k or more. I suspect this ...


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