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0

I think it's a 2004 model but it could be 2005 model for more information ask the dealer


-2

Data points: Cannondale Optimo: cracked downtube in under 2 years/12,000 km Trek 2.3: still okay after 10 years/70,000 km. Trek 1500: cracked drive side chainstay (age/distance not stated) Today my Optimo 63cm ( a Cannondale , pioneers of Aluminium bicycle frame... ) develop a crack around the diameter of the downtube, only 3 cm remaining holding the tube ...


3

I think the question deserves some additional treatment as to frame sizing. I realize the OP may have downplayed aspects of frame sizing in his question, but that's arguably the wrong approach. It benefits the end user to know how to select a bike size, and the parameters I describe may not have been in common use in 2011, when the question was asked. They ...


2

Hose clamps work. Might put a piece of foam to stop the cage from rattling.


1

As many have pointed out in comments and answers, bike sizing is not an absolute but a “fit window,” where it is possible more than one frame size could work for a particular rider. That said, given you dimensions, the fact my height and inseam are within a cm of yours, and the fact I have trialed risen a large number of brands and sizes I can say with a ...


2

You'll really want to look at the specific geometry of the bike, rather than the seat-tube size. As stated in the other answers, standover height is important, and should be shorter than your inseam by 1-2cm. Besides that, Stack and Reach are probably the second most important measurements to consider. If you can't try on a bike in person for pandemic ...


5

You have a few things to consider. First a Cannondale 56cm geometry is not identical to a Giant, Specialized or likely any other brand. Each brands designer has a specific goal in mind when they design a frame. So you can make a generalized statement that you may usually ride a 56cm it is not a hard and fast rule. One thing to consider is with the advent of ...


3

So it looks like the cantilever brake stud was pressed/punched into the frame from the rear of the brake tab, like in this photo, about 25 years ago. Over time and with braking this connection failed, and also maybe the bolt holding the canti arm onto the stud came loose and was lost. The non-invasive fix is to buy a replacement cantilever brake stud, ...


1

You can get cantilever bosses with a threaded end that can be removed from frames if your using disc brakes. That's definitely savable but it will take someone with an ounce of common sense to fix.


1

You should use tapered cones, so they work with any BB. There's no need to have different fittings for different BB.


15

The brake pivot broke off the frame in a very unusual way. A framebuilder may be able to contrive a pretty cheap way of fixing it by putting a new pivot stud in. This would still require removing the paint in the area, but it wouldn't necessarily be that bad. Minimum prices for framebuilders to even get into repair j jobs are typically in the $100-200 range ...


2

If it doesn't leak oil or anything, you always have the option of just leaving it as is. "If it ain't broke don't fix it." Otherwise, clear nail polish is an option. You'll want to extremely carefully sand or file the rough edges off. You can also buy just the upper half of the fork. You don't need to replace the entire thing.


1

The best solution (value and quality) is to replace the Crown Steerer Unit (CSU). There are other fixes such as nail polish but you always run the risk of tearing the seals. The work isn’t much difference to a full fork service. You can get the part number here: https://www.servicearchive.sram.com/sites/default/files/techdocs/rockshox_spc_-_rev_f_0.pdf You ...


4

It is a 2018 Norco Sight C2 Womens. Here’s the link: https://www.norco.com/bike-archives/2018/sight-c2-womens/


4

I can't comment but I would if I could. Bike thieves have a tendency to sand frames down. The fact that you live in Seattle, a city with many bike thefts coupled with the fact you got a multi thousand dollar bike for $100 points towards it being stolen. You should check local classifieds for people looking for their bike.


-1

What most of these answers don't take into account is that the weight difference is very noticeable because a human being powers a bicycle. For example let's look at cars and Lbs/HP, First up is a Fiat 500 2,465/100, that's 24.65 LBS/HP. Get into a 3,300 LB car that has 300 HP and that LBS/HP drops to 11 LBS/HP. The engine of a car doesn't feel the sensation ...


2

There is some validity to the observation. In aluminum, hydroforming on mainstream bikes only started in the early to mid aughts and got more prevalent and sophisticated from there, eventually to the point where even fairly low end bikes often have heavily manipulated tube shapes that would have been much more expensive to produce, if feasible at all, in the ...


1

First, let me stipulate that the real measure of "beefiness" would be tube-wall thickness, and that's something we can't determine just by looking at the outside. I am not aware that tube walls have gotten thinner. Second, in terms of tube diameter, I think we may see more variation than we did 20 or 30 years ago. The individual tubes that make up ...


0

There is no easy or readily available option for this problem. In my professional opinion, you should consider replacing this frame. However, there are options if you really want to keep using this frame. Ditch hollowtech and use a threadless square taper bb. Bond the shimano hollowtech cup to the frame. Weld and re-thread Threadless BB thread to eachother ...


2

I used to ride 12 centennials a month with a crew for several years. The answer is not to restrain your power so you don't flex the frame, the answer is to get a more durable frame. We rode French, Italian and German road frames; Peugeot, Colnago, and Daimler. I don't remember one frame failure. The frames were steel with lugs and silicon bronze brazed ...


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