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4

It sounds like the freehub is fine but a ding, the seam, or an out of true spot on the rim is smacking the brake as it goes by. If the less frequent noise (not the freehub click, the other one) is really coming from the hub that would be unusual and yes you would need to tear into the hub to investigate it. Hubs can occasionally make loud cyclic noises like ...


1

Maybe. Visually, it seems to be a click every ~60 degrees of wheel rotation. Depending on how many pawls in the freehub could indicate something clicking past each pawl. If the freehub has some other lockup mechanism, there may be ~6 of something inside to produce a similar gap. I'd expect the clicking to go away when the bike is driving forward under ...


3

Do you own a chain whip? If so you can put an old sprocket from a cassette on the freehub, hold it forwards with the chain whip and gently knock the gates sprocket in the reverse direction with a rubber mallet or similar. it generally doesn't take much force to loosen these off an alloy freehub. If it has bitten in very badly you may wish to employ the gates ...


6

It's probably stuck because it's digging in to the freehub body splines. Install just the lockring without any spacers. Use your cassette lockring tool to immobilize the freehub from turning, and use the strap wrench on the cog to lightly get it freed from the indentations. You hopefully don't have to apply so much force that the lockring gets torqued down ...


3

The Gates sprocket removal tool is the best way to remove the sprocket. Designed for quick, easy removal of your rear sprocket Page 75 Here's a link to a short video on how to use the tool.


1

You're right - copper grease/assembly compound is not a lubricant. But threads generally don't move once assembled+torqued, so don't need lubricant anyway. Having something to stop them seizing together is a different purpose than lube, though grease can do both tasks. Personally I use copper clay on all threads, grease in bearings, and light oils on ...


4

Greasing the freehub body splines is good when it's prone to creaking for whatever reason, which is largely a problem specific to aluminum shallow-spline (as opposed to the deep splined FH-7800 and WH-7800) freehubs and their issues with getting notched up. The lubrication can mitigate the noise, but not the damage. A coat of grease or antiseize is also ...


3

I think you are referring to copper antiseize, which is usually recommended to prevent galvanic corrosion with titanium bike parts. Generally, I would antiseize any interface where one of the parts is titanium. Almost all freehub bodies are aluminum or steel. They're interfacing with aluminum cog spiders and steel cogs. (NB: Shimano and Campagnolo's top end ...


5

Antiseize/copper grease is theoretically better, but plain old grease will work just fine. There’s no relative motion here, so lubricity is not a factor. All we are looking for is adding corrosion resistance to avoid sprockets being fused to the freehub body or the lockring getting stuck. I personally use grease on the freehub body and antiseize on the ...


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