22

The hub is the body at the center of the wheel containing the axle. It is more or less just some bearings in a pair of cups that rotate around the axle. The freewheel is the mechanism that locks when pedaling forward (forcing the wheel to be driven by the chain) and spins freely when coasting or pedaling backward. Both wheels have hubs, but only the rear ...


15

Such a hub exists for trike and quads . Pedal forward with 3 or 5 gears then having a coaster brake to stop . At full stop with the brake engaged continued backward pedal pressure will cause the cycle will move in reverse in a reduced gear . Sturmey-Archer has made these hubs for the niche market (velomobiles ) for some years now . The hubs have a sprocket ...


15

Standard Pawl and Ratchet Design This design is by far the most common on bicycle freehubs, and as such the least expensive to employ. Mechanism In it's simplest form, this design consists of a surface that is toothed and a pawl (which is a lever that engages the toothed surface and only allows movement in one direction). In a bicycle this design is ...


13

The specific model of rear derailleur you have is an Acera RD-M360 SGS, produced about 2009-2011, for 7 or 8 speed drivetrains. Shimano very helpfully provides archive specifications on the product info page. Looking in the 2009 spec PDF we can see that the max size of the largest sprocket the derailleur will handle is 34. I believe 12-34 freewheels do exist,...


12

In the context of a high-end MTB designed to go quickly over difficult terrain, trigger shifters have the following advantages: They can be operated using only the thumb, without changing the grip, so the index finger is always ready to brake. Getting mud on the gloves does not impair operation. Modern grip shifters do exist, Sram makes a wide range of ...


11

American Classic Cam Plate Design The full name is "Six Pawl Cam Actuated Engagement System." This design is one of the more complicated ones, but according to American Classic provides a stronger freehub with relatively low resistance and causes all 6 double tooth pawls to engage simultaneously with high precision. Mechanism There are several ...


11

As long as the crank arms, chain and freewheel turn freely and all as one. Without clunk's, slipping or sticking at any point there should be no need to replace any of it. The surface rust will not prevent it being fit for purpose and should wear off with use and some decent lubricant. You could always try a wire brush to remove surface rust without having ...


11

No sorry, this is not practical. Freewheels mostly stopped at 7 speed, and 8 speed was rare because of excess unsupported axle causing bent axles due to leverage. Your suggested plan would require fitting 8 speed shifters and an 8 speed rear mech. That's too much faffing about when you want to swap wheels. Instead, you could find an 11 speed hub with the ...


11

You are correct, the smallest sprocket is threaded to the freewheel on the old Maillard freewheels. Using two chain whips, one on the smallest sprocket, one on the next one up or a few farther. Unscrew the smallest sprocket, it is a standard thread. The second one will also be threaded so repeat the above steps. Here is a diagram for the Maillard 700 Course, ...


11

Many two wheel drive mountain bikes exist. Here's one article advertising a new one: There’s been no shortage of attempts to build a workable two wheel drive bicycle over the years, but this latest effort from Double of Japan looks like one of the most compelling yet. https://www.bikeradar.com/news/this-is-a-two-wheel-drive-bike-done-right-sort-of/ They do ...


10

If you take the back wheel off you should be able to examine the freewheel/cassette to determine which it is. Here is a picture of some common types. If yours doesn't look like one in the picture, post a close up and I'm sure someone here can identify it.


10

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


10

While it may be possible, by creating a mechanism that shifts the chain from one freewheel to another, or disconnecting one temporarily through mechanical actuators, the hassle and engineering it would take to make happen would be outweighed by the fact that it is almost entirely pointless. A fixed gear would be your best bet as it already does that. ...


10

It doesn't make much sense to insist on one thing being the opposite of another, so let's just focus on what these things are, and you can decide for yourself what, if anything, is "opposite" of what. A fixed-gear bicycle is one in which the rear sprocket is mounted rigidly to the rear wheel, so they can only rotate at the same speed as each other. A ...


9

From personal experience, having just changed to a cassette with less range, I have to say that smaller steps definitely offers some advantage. I went from an 8-speed 11-32 to a 12-23. Having a single tooth of difference between adjacent gears means that it's more likely that you will be in the "right gear". The "right gear" is the gear in which you aren't ...


9

While not suggesting its the best option, another option from a new cassette is a 30 tooth chainring. which will give close to same ratios as a 14-34 cassette. Square taper cranks can often be picked up free or very cheap at recycle centers or local bike coops. A 30th chainring will cost about the same as a new cassette, and you can shorten the chain (...


8

The ISO freewheel thread standard is 1.375" x 24tpi Most freewheels I have encountered have been ISO. Some hubs use "British" threading at 1.370" x 24tpi If you use an ISO freewheel on a British thread, it will work, but you should check there is enough thread engagement to avoid stripping the hub. The trials-oriented retailer TartyBikes suggests 9 thread ...


8

You can buy a flip hub rear wheel where one side is fixed, the other free (Some bikes even come with them). You just take the wheel off, flip sides and put it back on. Brakes will depend on the frame but most frames allow for the installation of brakes. For the rear brake, you'll just have run full cable housing along the frame with either wire ties or cable ...


8

Star Ratchet and variations This design in it's simplest form is used by DT Swiss. This design incorporates easily replaceable ratchet plates that offer the added benefit of every engagement point transferring torque. A more complicated variation is what is used in Chris King hubs. Mechanism - DT Swiss 1. end piece 2. bearing 3. thread ring 4. axle 5. ...


8

I have sometimes made the mistake of not tightening the locknuts enough, causing the rotation of bearings to drag the cone, tightening it enough for the bearing to bind. The solution is to properly tighten the locknuts. I'v been also in the situation of not having the right tools to remove the freewheel, which makes it more difficult. What I've done to ...


8

Engine oils are generally a bad idea on a bike. They tend to be quite liquid and will dribble out over time. Engine oils are also known to grab and hold dirt, because that's one of their purposes in a motor where there is an active filter. Your best lubricant for pawls is a lithium based grease, sometimes called white lithium. Avoid using too much. If ...


7

I think thats a Shimano freewheel, rather than a cassette. A Shimano freewheel needs a tool like a Park Tool FR-1 (or FR-1.2 or FR-1.3), which has 12 splines and a diameter of around 23 mm rather than the Shimano cassette tool (Park Tool FR-5 or its variants), which also has 12 splines but a diameter of around 23.4mm. See this link from Park Tool on how ...


7

Sprag Clutch The sprag clutch has existed in industrial applications for some time: being used in motorcycles, helicopters, airplanes, automotive transmissions, and others. As far as I know, Onyx is the only company to bring it to bicycle hubs. Sprag clutches offer low rolling resistance and virtually instantaneous engagement. They are also reliable and ...


7

Thats a Shimano freewheel, not a cassette. You need a freewheel remover like Park Tool FR-1 to remove it. Note that this is not the same tool as the cassette tool (e.g. Park Tool FR-5 for Shimano-type cassettes). See this link on how to remove it with the freewheel remover (Recommended method), or this link on how to destructively remove it without the ...


7

Simple answer: yes, but it’s not worth doing. Cost of hub, spokes, nipples and having wheel rebuilt will exceed the cost of a new wheel. Even if you re-use the spokes a new wheel will still be cheaper. Wheel building requires special equipment, expertise and time to do correctly.


7

Yes - I have personally done this, by installing an 8 speed cassette freehub into a wheel that had a 6 speed freewheel. The donor was a 26" MTB wheel, and the recipient was a 20" wheel for my folding bike It was only worth doing because I had a donor wheel and I was able to reuse the 20" spokes well enough. I even reused the 8 speed cassette and chain. ...


7

The Park Tool FR-3 should fit that. https://www.parktool.com/product/freewheel-remover-fr-3


7

Shimano makes the TZ510 7-speed freewheel which is 14-34 teeth. It generally retails for under $20. You'll need to get a "freewheel removal tool" which is a splined tool on one side while the other side has a 1 inch hex nut. From Park Tool, the model FR 1.3, are less than $10 and a well equipped bike shop generally has these in stock. Be aware ...


7

It almost certainly won't happen with a cassette hub. It can happen on standard axle cassette hubs, but it takes a lot, and there's basically always a dropout alignment problem at work in addition to heavy loads over time when it does. Eight and nine speed standard axle (M10 or 3/8") freewheel hubs are the definition of a cynical design. They work ...


7

I've owned/looked after a few bikes with twist shifters. They've always become stiff to the point of being hard to shift at all after a few years, even with new cables, and they're a pain to strip down compared to trigger shifters. I have successfully de- and re-greased some ancient SIS trigger shifters to good-as-new condition but never did so well with ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible