27

Most of the noise comes from pawls on the freewheel hitting against the splines on the engagment surfaces which makes up the racheting unit. Some reasons for the noise between freewheels? Tension on pawls could be higher causing more noise as they glide over the engagment surfaces High end freewheels have more pawls and engagement points than lower end ...


19

The hub is the body at the center of the wheel containing the axle. It is more or less just some bearings in a pair of cups that rotate around the axle. The freewheel is the mechanism that locks when pedaling forward (forcing the wheel to be driven by the chain) and spins freely when coasting or pedaling backward. Both wheels have hubs, but only the rear ...


15

Standard Pawl and Ratchet Design This design is by far the most common on bicycle freehubs, and as such the least expensive to employ. Mechanism In it's simplest form, this design consists of a surface that is toothed and a pawl (which is a lever that engages the toothed surface and only allows movement in one direction). In a bicycle this design is ...


14

Such a hub exists for trike and quads . Pedal forward with 3 or 5 gears then having a coaster brake to stop . At full stop with the brake engaged continued backward pedal pressure will cause the cycle will move in reverse in a reduced gear . Sturmey-Archer has made these hubs for the niche market (velomobiles ) for some years now . The hubs have a sprocket ...


11

Your hub has a normal freewheel, like described by Matt Adams (ratchet with pawls). There are some models which have spring-loaded cylinders mounted around "tilted" teeth: when you spin it to one side, the cylinders slip. When you spin it to the other side, the cylinders are caught between opposite surfaces, and torque is transmitted by friction (there is ...


11

As already said, Shimano used to manufacture Silient Clutch rear hub. But that has been stopped a few years ago, so if you manage to source one - you are lucky man. I used to have one of them and it was truly silent. It was heavier than standard shimano LX hub, but it was silent and with instant engagement. Also I used Chris King hubs. If you put a lot of ...


11

For the same reason you can't have a fixie with a chain tensioner. The load on the chain when slowing a fixie is too great and in the wrong direction for a derailler or tensioner to hold. The cage will be pulled forward and your chain will skip make a nasty noise and most likely come off or break something expensive.


11

As long as the crank arms, chain and freewheel turn freely and all as one. Without clunk's, slipping or sticking at any point there should be no need to replace any of it. The surface rust will not prevent it being fit for purpose and should wear off with use and some decent lubricant. You could always try a wire brush to remove surface rust without having ...


11

No sorry, this is not practical. Freewheels mostly stopped at 7 speed, and 8 speed was rare because of excess unsupported axle causing bent axles due to leverage. Your suggested plan would require fitting 8 speed shifters and an 8 speed rear mech. That's too much faffing about when you want to swap wheels. Instead, you could find an 11 speed hub with the ...


10

If you take the back wheel off you should be able to examine the freewheel/cassette to determine which it is. Here is a picture of some common types. If yours doesn't look like one in the picture, post a close up and I'm sure someone here can identify it.


10

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


10

While it may be possible, by creating a mechanism that shifts the chain from one freewheel to another, or disconnecting one temporarily through mechanical actuators, the hassle and engineering it would take to make happen would be outweighed by the fact that it is almost entirely pointless. A fixed gear would be your best bet as it already does that. ...


10

American Classic Cam Plate Design The full name is "Six Pawl Cam Actuated Engagement System." This design is one of the more complicated ones, but according to American Classic provides a stronger freehub with relatively low resistance and causes all 6 double tooth pawls to engage simultaneously with high precision. Mechanism There are several parts to ...


10

It doesn't make much sense to insist on one thing being the opposite of another, so let's just focus on what these things are, and you can decide for yourself what, if anything, is "opposite" of what. A fixed-gear bicycle is one in which the rear sprocket is mounted rigidly to the rear wheel, so they can only rotate at the same speed as each other. A ...


9

That particular Shimano freehub can be disassembled, but it is quite a job to get it back together afterward. There are around 80 2mm bearings in two different locations in the freehub, and a skilled and practiced mechanic has roughly a 60% chance of opening without losing parts, and successfully getting it back together. The good news is, there is a tool ...


9

From personal experience, having just changed to a cassette with less range, I have to say that smaller steps definitely offers some advantage. I went from an 8-speed 11-32 to a 12-23. Having a single tooth of difference between adjacent gears means that it's more likely that you will be in the "right gear". The "right gear" is the gear in which you aren't ...


8

Short answer. Hub integrity can not really be judged by noise alone, but by feel. If you feel it slipping under load the hub could be damaged beyond repair. The quiet smooth feel, but working normally is just a good, sealed hub that the manufacturer built in a way that has smaller or less splines. The full monty. A free wheel hub consists of a few key ...


8

The ISO freewheel thread standard is 1.375" x 24tpi Most freewheels I have encountered have been ISO. Some hubs use "British" threading at 1.370" x 24tpi If you use an ISO freewheel on a British thread, it will work, but you should check there is enough thread engagement to avoid stripping the hub. The trials-oriented retailer TartyBikes suggests 9 thread ...


8

You can buy a flip hub rear wheel where one side is fixed, the other free (Some bikes even come with them). You just take the wheel off, flip sides and put it back on. Brakes will depend on the frame but most frames allow for the installation of brakes. For the rear brake, you'll just have run full cable housing along the frame with either wire ties or cable ...


7

I think thats a Shimano freewheel, rather than a cassette. A Shimano freewheel needs a tool like a Park Tool FR-1 (or FR-1.2 or FR-1.3), which has 12 splines and a diameter of around 23 mm rather than the Shimano cassette tool (Park Tool FR-5 or its variants), which also has 12 splines but a diameter of around 23.4mm. See this link from Park Tool on how ...


7

Star Ratchet and variations This design in it's simplest form is used by DT Swiss. This design incorporates easily replaceable ratchet plates that offer the added benefit of every engagement point transferring torque. A more complicated variation is what is used in Chris King hubs. Mechanism - DT Swiss 1. end piece 2. bearing 3. thread ring 4. axle 5. ...


7

Thats a Shimano freewheel, not a cassette. You need a freewheel remover like Park Tool FR-1 to remove it. Note that this is not the same tool as the cassette tool (e.g. Park Tool FR-5 for Shimano-type cassettes). See this link on how to remove it with the freewheel remover (Recommended method), or this link on how to destructively remove it without the ...


7

Simple answer: yes, but it’s not worth doing. Cost of hub, spokes, nipples and having wheel rebuilt will exceed the cost of a new wheel. Even if you re-use the spokes a new wheel will still be cheaper. Wheel building requires special equipment, expertise and time to do correctly.


7

Yes - I have personally done this, by installing an 8 speed cassette freehub into a wheel that had a 6 speed freewheel. The donor was a 26" MTB wheel, and the recipient was a 20" wheel for my folding bike It was only worth doing because I had a donor wheel and I was able to reuse the 20" spokes well enough. I even reused the 8 speed cassette and chain. ...


6

EDIT: This is an HG 50 Cassette. This is an exploded view of a Shimano freehub showing the 10mm or 12mm allen key used to remove the freehub from the hub shell. I believe this is the allen you are referencing, but it need not be removed to remove the gear cluster. Instructions for removing either a cassette or a freewheel can be found here. If it is ...


6

I had the same problem (48x38x28 chainset). It turned out that MF-TZ21 is actually not a 'cassette', but a 'freewheel'. Your options for that are very limited: In the UK, Raleigh is distributing a 7 speed 13-24T model for less than 10 quid. SunRace is still producing 7 speed freewheels, but the closed-spaced 12-?? model wasn't distributed in the UK: Check ...


6

The 14/28 is the number of teeth on the smallest and largest cog of the cassette. From your description you want to make at least the second number smaller, possibly the first number. As long as your replacement says that it's Shimano compatible (and 7 speed), you should be fine. Count the teeth on the cog that has the most teeth that you actually use......


6

My son wanted to change his freewheel/cassete hub to a freecoaster hub so I did some research about 6 months ago and found this great YouTube video from Odyssey and RideBMX magazine all about freecoaster hubs. As you said, the cranks will not move when coasting backwards. For my son, this is the real advantage and why he wanted the hubs. Landing a 180 out ...


6

If you're saying that, off the body, the sprockets move slightly relative to each other, that's not a problem. The sprockets are only just "tacked" together so that they remain in the right order and orientation while off the body. The body provides the strength to hold them. If, on the other hand, you notice that the sprockets slide up and down the body ...


6

Police / Law Enforcement bikes often have a quiet freehub. This Cannondale Law Enforcement bicycle refers to it as a "Silent Clutch Rear Hub" and specifically mentions "R085" as a model number (further googling suggests it's a Shimano).


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