11

In the context of a high-end MTB designed to go quickly over difficult terrain, trigger shifters have the following advantages: They can be operated using only the thumb, without changing the grip, so the index finger is always ready to brake. Getting mud on the gloves does not impair operation. Modern grip shifters do exist, Sram makes a wide range of ...


11

You are correct, the smallest sprocket is threaded to the freewheel on the old Maillard freewheels. Using two chain whips, one on the smallest sprocket, one on the next one up or a few farther. Unscrew the smallest sprocket, it is a standard thread. The second one will also be threaded so repeat the above steps. Here is a diagram for the Maillard 700 Course, ...


7

It almost certainly won't happen with a cassette hub. It can happen on standard axle cassette hubs, but it takes a lot, and there's basically always a dropout alignment problem at work in addition to heavy loads over time when it does. Eight and nine speed standard axle (M10 or 3/8") freewheel hubs are the definition of a cynical design. They work ...


7

I've had twist shifters on a couple of bikes, and I prefer trigger shifters because I like to keep the skin on my fingers - too often I would have to grip them tight when adding tension to the cable, and would almost get proto-blisters in my purlicue. They also mean that I'm effectively letting go of control of that side of the handlebar, as my hand is ...


7

I've owned/looked after a few bikes with twist shifters. They've always become stiff to the point of being hard to shift at all after a few years, even with new cables, and they're a pain to strip down compared to trigger shifters. I have successfully de- and re-greased some ancient SIS trigger shifters to good-as-new condition but never did so well with ...


7

I can think of three things that could contribute to the pedal stroke "floating" before it engages: A hub with a high number of "degrees of engagement," or low number of "points of engagement." Hubs have a ratcheting mechanism inside that allows them to freewheel when they're not receiving power from the cranks. The points of ...


6

You should normally be able to install the quick release with adequate force to hold the wheel, with a freely spinning hub. Tightening the quick release does have a small effect on the hubs but yours is seemingly exaggerated, and you have a noticeable creaky noise which presumably you didn't have before. I think you therefore have an issue inside the hub to ...


6

You just noticed that quick release tightness affects the bearing preload. If your hub has cup and cone bearings, you can adjust the bearing preload so that you are able to tighten the QR skewer to maximum tightness without the bearings being too tight. This is one of the advantages of cup and cone bearings and part of the reason why cup and cone bearings ...


5

The community generally seems to advocate against upgrading your bike. I'm not sure why, it often makes alot more sense than buying new and more than buying used much of the time. If your bike was originally equipped with Shimano 600 the likelyhood is that it's a good quality frame with other good components so it's probably worth upgrading if you love it. ...


5

You are referring to your freehub’s angle of engagement. That is, how many degrees does your pedal need to travel before the freehub engages and transmits your power to the drivetrain. Here is a primer by Matt Wikstrom of Cyclingtips on freehubs, and it does cover this topic. The bad news is that you can’t change your existing hub’s angle of engagement ...


5

Freewheels normally had uneven spacing between gears back back then. Until indexed shifting became popular starting in the mid-80s, there was no need for spacing to be consistent. The outer sprockets were threaded on, and the inner ones were splined, so they weren't even attached in the same way. (Aside: I recall a bike shop had threaded together a "9-...


4

Axles break for various reasons - weight is only one of them. Miss aligned dropouts, flexing in the frame, tension of the QR all play a big part. Different axles with slightly different materials will also have an effect - some are stronger overall, some more brittle, some more prone to fatigue. As you identified, riding style also affects the axle loading. ...


4

As a famous marketer once said, there are more cockroaches than humans. So there are more trigger shifters than twisting grips. In fact, two of the most expensive shifting systems, Pinion and Rolhoff, both uses twist shifters (as far as I know, there were some experimental trigger shifters being developed and funded on Kickstarter for Pinion). You do not see ...


3

Derailleur bicycles are regularly ridden with more than twice the misalignment of what you have. They have to be ridden this way, because you can't fit N cogs into the space of 1 cog, well unless N=1. So some cogs have non-straight chainline. Usually you can even backpedal these bikes with no ill effect. If you have a chain tensioner, your bicycle differs ...


3

Take off the axle nut, slide on the freewheel tool, and replace the nut so that it holds the freewheel tool in place. Lock the freewheel tool in a bench vise. Grasp the wheel at the rim and turn counter-clockwise to unscrew. This gives you more leverage and control than a wrench.


3

Basically everything shifting related. 9 speed uses a narrower chain and a wider cassette so you’ll need: New shifters, new chain, new cassette, new rear derailleur, new chainrings. Your old front derailleur+shifter might work. New cables+cable housing will probably be necessary. It’s possible you need a new rear hub (could be cheaper to get a whole wheel) ...


3

Kengine FR-04 Old Style Shimano Freewheel Remover Bike Tool fits FFS TL-FW20 This is what you need. It has 12 splines and is 20mm diameter. it is being sold on Ebay by the_bikesmiths. I hope this helps. it took me awhile to find it.


3

If the rim is moving side-to-side when you ride your wheel is out of true and needs truing (i.e. the spoke tension has to be adjusted). It’s especially noticeable with rim brakes because the rim will start to rub on the brake pads during some parts of its rotation. If only the tire is wobbling: Some wobble can be normal, if it’s worse the tire is probably ...


3

Both of these models are freewheels not cassettes. They are for the most part interchangeable. The only area of concern would be the size of the largest cog. Too large a difference from you original model may necessitate a longer or shorter chain. You may also need to make some small adjustments get the shifting optimized.


3

With a freewheel system, the bearings are closer together leaving a long stretch of axle unsupported past the right side bearings. It is common to bend or even break axles in these systems no matter what weight the rider puts on it. The heavier rider will probably notice more frequently bent axles that occur soon after replacement. Seven speed freewheel ...


2

It appears you did something along the lines of take a multi-speed freewheel hub, put a BMX freewheel on it, then rearrange the spacers to get the chainline dialed with the front. Having the rear wheel offset from the frame centerline will disrupt handling and it is possible to imagine safety repercussions on that basis. Many would find it less pleasant to ...


2

I ran Gripshift Shifters back in the mid 90's for 5 years. I had previously had STI Thumb Shifters. Pros for me were: Less Bulk on the bars, they were just a cleaner setup. Probably more "aero" but that didn't really matter for me, I was a slow MTB racer! Change from top to bottom of rear chainset in one movement (not that you would do that), ...


2

The trick is to grasp and turn the wheel itself, rather than turning the freewheel tool. This gives greater mechanical advantage, since the wheel’s radius is (probably) longer than your wrench. Of course, something needs to hold the freewheel tool fixed in place while you grab and turn the wheel. One option is to tighten the freewheel tool into a bench vise. ...


1

Your RD-M591 is a 9 speed rear derailleur, and has these ratings: Item Value Low sprocket_Max 34T Low sprocket_Min 28T Capacity 45T High sprocket Max 12T High sprocket Min 11T So nominally your high gears are not high enough, there's a reasonable chance it would work anyway. It could be a bit noisier and have slower shifting in the high/hard gears. ...


1

On the non drive side (left) of the bike is where you should first focus your attention. The bike axle is double nutted on both sides which effectively locks the nuts in the same spot keeping the spacing of the axle properly spaced for the bearing system to work appropriately. If the inner nut tries to turn, the outer nut prevents that by opposing force on ...


1

It could be a Falcon freewheel which would mean you would need a Park FR-7 tool. As far as disassembling the freewheel itself, the bearing race should unscrew clockwise. I don't know of a tool for that other than taking a large nail to tap at the two round indents.


1

Assuming this is a standard freewheel hub there should be no need to disassemble it, since you can simply remove the freewheel and install a single-speed freewheel made for this replacement process. To remove the old freewheel you generally need a freewheel tool that matches the existing freewheel's design. There are a half-dozen different schemes for this, ...


1

I just replaced mine today, I got a higher quality than what I used to have. The one I had was cheap quality and failed on me with only 300 km , lots of knocking sounds coming out of it. Honestly higher quality less stress, and more peace of mind


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