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24

It's hard to say exactly what the cause is, but I see two main possibilities: Mechanical causes Brake pads. If the pads are very close to the rotor when at rest, and have minimal motion to close on the rotor then that may be enough to wedge them. Try inspecting the brake pads and if worn, replace them. Brake pads are consumable. Thin brake pad ...


21

The 'noodle' (the curved silver tube the brake cable passes through) has slipped through the holder on the right-hand (in your picture) brake caliper. The noodle is designed to come out of the holder to spread the calipers to enable the wheel to be taken out. The proper configuration looks like this: Squeeze the calipers together and free the noodle from ...


21

The return spring on the right hand caliper (from the point of view of sitting on the bike) has come out of its stop in the caliper. The spring in the left hand caliper is pulling both calipers to the left. You can see the return spring sticking horizontally out of the right hand caliper. It looks like about 10cm of stiff wire. The spring wire should be on ...


10

Don't - its dangerous ( Majority of braking force comes from front brakes) and in many countries illegal to ride on the road without 2 operational brakes. Likely you are using too much force and not enough control. You need to learn to feather brakes rather than jam them on, while shifting the weight back and lower. Another possibility is you are using ...


9

It is unusual to see a hydraulic brake described as on/off, as they are usually well known for their modulation. However I have had an experience of this before with a friends bike. He was regularly locking up the rear wheel, and initially I put it down to inexperience as a new rider - until I rode the bike myself and found the brake to be extremely '...


8

A further thing to watch out for when following Argenti's (correct) advice: Check the end of the noodle holder very carefully. I've seen some old, cheap V brakes in which this was too soft and opened up allowing the noodle to slip through in a similar way to the photos in the question, when you squeeze the brakes very hard. Here's a sketch of the end of ...


8

Here's an annotated rotated version of your photo: To get the wheel in: Pull the RUBBER BOOT to the right, slide it along the INNER CABLE toward the PINCH BOLT Squeeze the BRAKE ARMS together at the top. This allows the NOODLE to move to the left, permitting the YOKE to swing away from the NOODLE. When the bike is upside down like yours, it may need a ...


6

You can do it with files. The chrome does make the surface harder but it's not a big deal. This is usually seen when the fork was originally slotted to take a 5/16" axle. I'm not a Raleigh historian but I'd be a little surprised were that the case on a Grand Prix. It's also possible that it's a fork that fits a 9mm front axle very tightly, and you're trying ...


5

As comments to the question point out, your front shifter is a grip shift. It operates as a friction shifter, whether intentionally or not. This means its operation is more "analog" than "digital", with no one-to-one correspondence between grip's positions and front chainrings. Rather, there is a spectrum of derailleur states, some of which do cause the ...


5

Most V brakes can be disengaged by the process the manual says. Anther term for this part is the cable-hook link or the cradle and the noodle. Some most-basic V-brakes do not have this feature and may require releasing the cable-fixing bolt. The process is shown in this video Then you will have to properly setup the ...


4

To answer the last part of your question: yes, ABS systems for bicycles exist (a quick searching of the Internet is enough to see that). However, they are not widespread and are mostly for OEM city bikes where there are no expectations about rider's skills. As a result, maybe not something readily available for an end user to buy. In absence of ABS, and ...


4

Nowadays most bikes have a 'threadless' headset. The steerer tube of the fork protrudes out of the frame's head tube and the stem clamps onto it. The stem serves to hold the whole system together and apply a little pre-load force onto the bearings to remove any play or movement. Without this pre-load the bearings will become damaged as the fork rocks in the ...


4

If the fork is hard to grind, or you value it more and don't want to damage it, maybe you can grind the threads of the axle a little bit, where it meets the dropouts. I've never done this, though. Not sure if entirely safe. But what I've done quite recently was to swap the QR axle for a non-QR one with nuts, on a commuter bike, for anti-theft purposes. It ...


4

Different brake pads have different amounts of "grab." You may consider changing the type of brake pad you use in your disc brake. Sintered or metallic pads are generally considered to have less initial "bite" than organic pads.


3

Make sure the derailleur is clean and nothing is jamming the mechanism that is preventing the cage from moving inboard. Make sure the derailleur is mounted with the cage parallel to the chainrings, and isn't mounted to high. Possibly the cage is bent.


3

This feels like something is not quite correct with the front brake. Sorry, I've missed if you've provided the make/model, but theoretically, modern hydraulic disc brakes should allow complete modulation through the braking phase rather than an all or nothing approach. That suggests contamination, sticking piston(s) or calipers, etc. You could also check ...


3

I had a 1981 Raleigh Arena with a more modern 1990's shimano wheelset. The axle did not fit through the fork's dropouts, but there was enough space at the top of the dropouts. Given it was a steel fork, I was able to pull one fork leg/tine out and over the axle, at a time. On the plus side, that wheel could not fall out even if I lost the whole QR.


2

Everyone will tell you that the threads are right-hand threads. Hence you tighten the screw by turning clockwise. But turning left or right only makes sense relative to something else. It's not too tricky if the barrel adjuster is at the shifter. It is tricky for an inline barrel adjuster, one in the middle of the cable. It only made sense to me when I saw ...


2

Shimano used the same actuation ratio for all rear derailleurs up 9 speed on mountain bikes, and I'm pretty sure the same holds for front derailleurs. That means you can use any 8 or 9 speed front derailleur to replace a 9 speed M760. I'd go with a FD-M4000 Alivio or FD-M3000 Acera if you want a new unit. Older 9 speed derailleurs will work if you can find ...


2

As long as the rim is 700c, any hubs with the thru axle dimensions you mentioned will work. Fork size is 100x15 with thru axle. Rear drops size 142мм x 12мм thru axle also. So it means i need any hubs which will fit these sizes? Because i know that these standarts are mostly for mountain bikes, and know nothing about how they fit the 700c wheels. This is ...


2

You've over-tightened the hub, the most likely explanation. Hub tightening needs a lot of forth and back between too little and too much. And putting the hub into the fork and tightening the axle nuts may also become that little too much. Remove the wheel, undo the locking nut and the cone by 1/8 of a turn. Hold the cone with your cone-wrench and relock ...


2

Look at the front shifter metal cage. Is the chain touching it? It is the most likely problem. It may be more apparent with certain gears in the rear than with others. If yes, shift to the middle in the back. Try to turn the barrel adjuster on your left shifter one way and back. Does the noise change? It should and you should be able to find a position ...


2

The first thing to check is if your wheel is slightly misaligned in the dropouts. Disk brake tolerances are pretty small. From the web it looks like the front wheel has a quick release. Try untightening the wheel and reseating it in the dropouts. If that doesn't fix the grinding noise, you should check if the pads have adjusted too far in or the brake rotor ...


2

Yes. A front derailleur marketed as for a 9 speed system will work normally with your 7 speed set up. Really the front derailleur doesn't care how many cogs are in the back. Generally, using a front drive system designed and marketed for "X"-speed systems will work in an "X+/-1" system. For example, I use 10 speed crankset in ...


1

Sounds to me like you want a front rack, and then to mount your container on that. There's unlikely to be anything available retail that matches your needs, so I see some engineering and modifications in your future. Rack Exactly how your rack is mounted depends a lot on the bike's frame and fork, in what mounting points are offered. Fixed fork, no ...


1

Those brakes are far out of alignment. The brake arms should be symmetric around the bike's centerline. You may need to let some slack into the cable, at least temporarily by loosening the cable-fixing bolt and letting 1-2 cm more slack in. You'll see small screws pointing outward near the pivots. These pre-load the springs for each brake arm. Tighten the ...


1

There are two ways to assemble a new bike. The right way The way it's usually done To answer your question: The front brakes need to be widened to fit the wheel, it says to 'disengage the cable guide tube from it's yoke'. Not sure where or how and I don't want to force anything and break it. It looks like you are concerned with getting the front ...


1

If the housing is loose and falling out of the barrel adjuster, either the end of the cable as come loose, or the housing has come out of a frame stop (or the shifter itself, seeing as you have the bar tape off), or the cable has broken (or cable end in the shifter may have detached). There is also a chance that the shifter is broken. If you've grabbed the ...


1

First check that all the spokes from the front wheel have the proper tension. As the disc brake is on the left side of the wheel, the force applied on it when braking deforms it and tilt it a little bit. Is a common effect but shouldn't be so important or dangerous. However if the spokes have not the adequate tension, it could be increase this feeling. Check ...


1

It is a normal effect with disc brakes, the major reason why most motorbikes have left and right discs at the front. Braking on the left side only will cause a slight deformation of the left leg of the fork, pushing it backwards. The wheel follows. I'd guess you have quick releases on your bike. If you do, try to tighten it a bit more. Through axles have ...


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