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21

The return spring on the right hand caliper (from the point of view of sitting on the bike) has come out of its stop in the caliper. The spring in the left hand caliper is pulling both calipers to the left. You can see the return spring sticking horizontally out of the right hand caliper. It looks like about 10cm of stiff wire. The spring wire should be on ...


21

The 'noodle' (the curved silver tube the brake cable passes through) has slipped through the holder on the right-hand (in your picture) brake caliper. The noodle is designed to come out of the holder to spread the calipers to enable the wheel to be taken out. The proper configuration looks like this: Squeeze the calipers together and free the noodle from ...


9

You can do it with files. The chrome does make the surface harder but it's not a big deal. This is usually seen when the fork was originally slotted to take a 5/16" axle. I'm not a Raleigh historian but I'd be a little surprised were that the case on a Grand Prix. It's also possible that it's a fork that fits a 9mm front axle very tightly, and you're ...


8

A further thing to watch out for when following Argenti's (correct) advice: Check the end of the noodle holder very carefully. I've seen some old, cheap V brakes in which this was too soft and opened up allowing the noodle to slip through in a similar way to the photos in the question, when you squeeze the brakes very hard. Here's a sketch of the end of ...


8

Here's an annotated rotated version of your photo: To get the wheel in: Pull the RUBBER BOOT to the right, slide it along the INNER CABLE toward the PINCH BOLT Squeeze the BRAKE ARMS together at the top. This allows the NOODLE to move to the left, permitting the YOKE to swing away from the NOODLE. When the bike is upside down like yours, it may need a ...


6

Your brake is certainly not properly set up. Do not ride the bike in this state! The rotor's brake track must run fully between the brake pads. The radial dimension of both match. You rotor may be too small for the brake it its present set up, your wheel not properly inserted, or the brake caliper not mounted correctly. Check your brake's manual for ...


6

If the fork is hard to grind, or you value it more and don't want to damage it, maybe you can grind the threads of the axle a little bit, where it meets the dropouts. I've never done this, though. Not sure if entirely safe. But what I've done quite recently was to swap the QR axle for a non-QR one with nuts, on a commuter bike, for anti-theft purposes. It ...


5

Most V brakes can be disengaged by the process the manual says. Anther term for this part is the cable-hook link or the cradle and the noodle. Some most-basic V-brakes do not have this feature and may require releasing the cable-fixing bolt. The process is shown in this video Then you will have to properly setup the ...


5

As comments to the question point out, your front shifter is a grip shift. It operates as a friction shifter, whether intentionally or not. This means its operation is more "analog" than "digital", with no one-to-one correspondence between grip's positions and front chainrings. Rather, there is a spectrum of derailleur states, some of which do cause the ...


5

Yes, this is play in the bearings. How to fix it depends on the type of hub you have. 'Cup and cone' bearing hubs have ball bearings between fixed cups in the hub and adjustable cones on a threaded axle. These can be adjusted to take out play. Other hubs have pressed-in cartridge bearings. These just need to get replaced , you'll probably need a bike repair ...


5

If your bike looks like the stock photo, then possibly. However you may need new wheels. There's a bolt that passes through the fork from front to back, just above the mudguard/fender. This would be where a caliper brake would mount, and the mudguard would be "pinched" under the nut, on the other side of the fork from the brake mech. You would ...


4

The front derailleur height always needs to be adjusted when making this switch. You should assume the front derailleur will need to be completely re-adjusted. Dropping in a crank for a higher speed generation than the chain you're running usually results in some degree of rub between the chain and the large ring when in some of the small/small combinations. ...


3

Make sure the derailleur is clean and nothing is jamming the mechanism that is preventing the cage from moving inboard. Make sure the derailleur is mounted with the cage parallel to the chainrings, and isn't mounted to high. Possibly the cage is bent.


3

I had a 1981 Raleigh Arena with a more modern 1990's shimano wheelset. The axle did not fit through the fork's dropouts, but there was enough space at the top of the dropouts. Given it was a steel fork, I was able to pull one fork leg/tine out and over the axle, at a time. On the plus side, that wheel could not fall out even if I lost the whole QR.


2

This is a judgement call depending on the kid, the terrain, and the bike. My kids have balance bikes with no brakes at all. We don't ride them in hills or traffic. These bikes are a good way to learn how to steer and balance in a controlled environment. My kids later graduated to fixed gear bikes with a front brake only. I consider the fixed gear to be "...


2

Everyone will tell you that the threads are right-hand threads. Hence you tighten the screw by turning clockwise. But turning left or right only makes sense relative to something else. It's not too tricky if the barrel adjuster is at the shifter. It is tricky for an inline barrel adjuster, one in the middle of the cable. It only made sense to me when I saw ...


2

Look at the front shifter metal cage. Is the chain touching it? It is the most likely problem. It may be more apparent with certain gears in the rear than with others. If yes, shift to the middle in the back. Try to turn the barrel adjuster on your left shifter one way and back. Does the noise change? It should and you should be able to find a position ...


2

The first thing to check is if your wheel is slightly misaligned in the dropouts. Disk brake tolerances are pretty small. From the web it looks like the front wheel has a quick release. Try untightening the wheel and reseating it in the dropouts. If that doesn't fix the grinding noise, you should check if the pads have adjusted too far in or the brake rotor ...


2

Yes. A front derailleur marketed as for a 9 speed system will work normally with your 7 speed set up. Really the front derailleur doesn't care how many cogs are in the back. Generally, using a front drive system designed and marketed for "X"-speed systems will work in an "X+/-1" system. For example, I use 10 speed crankset in ...


2

It looks like it needs some adjustment around the bearings, you need to pop the wheel and rubber gaiters off and you may be able to see any problem better ,


2

[This answer is based on OP's pictures and comments about what worked in the end] The fork has IS brake mount interface, the brake caliper is for PM (post mount) interface. An adapter to keep them together is required. IS/PM adapters come in many variants. The main difference between them is the disc diameter difference they dictate. Just a few examples (...


1

There are too many spacers, and/or too small of a rotor. Don't ride it this way, get it fixed first.


1

If your bike has a Shimano external bearing bottom bracket, a newer Shimano crank will still fit. Shimano has kept the crank spindle diameter and length the same. 12-28 cassettes were common with 53-39 cranks. If this is what you have be aware that you will have a lower top gear ratio. You can change to an 11-28 cassette and get a slightly higher ratio. If ...


1

I've recently overhauled a Quando front axle with pitted cones. Fortunately, I do have a Quando hub with the common 3/16" and not the unusually large 1/4" ball bearings. However, the bearings had standard sized balls at 3/16 in. I replaced them with with Shimano Y00091210 balls. I couldn't find the exact cones as replacement. However a standard set ...


1

Sounds to me like you want a front rack, and then to mount your container on that. There's unlikely to be anything available retail that matches your needs, so I see some engineering and modifications in your future. Rack Exactly how your rack is mounted depends a lot on the bike's frame and fork, in what mounting points are offered. Fixed fork, no ...


1

Those brakes are far out of alignment. The brake arms should be symmetric around the bike's centerline. You may need to let some slack into the cable, at least temporarily by loosening the cable-fixing bolt and letting 1-2 cm more slack in. You'll see small screws pointing outward near the pivots. These pre-load the springs for each brake arm. Tighten the ...


1

There are two ways to assemble a new bike. The right way The way it's usually done To answer your question: The front brakes need to be widened to fit the wheel, it says to 'disengage the cable guide tube from it's yoke'. Not sure where or how and I don't want to force anything and break it. It looks like you are concerned with getting the front ...


1

If the housing is loose and falling out of the barrel adjuster, either the end of the cable as come loose, or the housing has come out of a frame stop (or the shifter itself, seeing as you have the bar tape off), or the cable has broken (or cable end in the shifter may have detached). There is also a chance that the shifter is broken. If you've grabbed the ...


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