Hot answers tagged

24

The Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute did a impact test of two sets of helmets. One of them cheap (US$20.00) the other expensive (US$200.00). The results are clear: there's no difference. Buy from a reputable brand. Just check: If it has the U.S. CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION (CPSC) label If it is confortable in your head (you'll use it more) BTW, they ...


23

It's safer and way easier just to buy another MissingLink (KMC's name for their master link design) of the same type (pin length) the chain came with, leaving you with an inner link that has one on either end. They're around $2US. In addition to saving the trouble of getting the pin back in there, there's also the question of the integrity of modern outer ...


20

Yeah, buy a used bike somewhere, either at a shop that has a bunch, or off or Craig's List or another "want ad" source. And, of course, there are yard sales. If you shop carefully you can probably pick up a serviceable bike for $50-100. But first study bikes a little to learn to recognize quality. Look at the cheap bikes at Walmart and some moderately ...


15

This article titled, How to Get the Pin Back Into a Bike Chain, will give you a step by step guide on how to put the pin back in a bike chain. Edit: I'm copying the article just in case the link ever becomes broken (no pun intended). The information below is from felixarizona.com Edit 2: I removed the content that can be found here for possible copyright ...


14

The three-foot extension noodle is absolutely obnoxious and a genuine safety hazard (for starters, how is another cyclist supposed to safely pass her?). The original point of these noodles, as I've seen them, is to cut one as wide as the widest part of your bike so cars could better gauge how much distance they needed to pass you. Perspective distortion and ...


13

Recycled Cycles (in the University District area) sells used bicycles, I would also checkout seattle.craigslist.org I recommend going into a bike shop that just sells bicycles (Gregg's near Green Lake is great - but many others all around Seattle) and tell them what sort of riding you are planning (commuting, shopping and using the bicycle as transportation)...


13

Here are a few loud horns: The hornit: A shop I used to work at sold these and they are extremely loud - around 140 decibels, but they sound like a loud beep rather than a horn. It takes 2 AAA batteries. Costs $45 US. The nice thing about this one is the button to press is remote, so you can have the horn on your fork or wherever. Airzound: http://...


13

Instead of an actual GPS device, I would recommend buying a used smart phone, (The Strava app itself only works on either iPhones or Androids). A "Nothing Special" used smart phone you can usually find for maybe 40 bucks, depending on the model and brand. Download the app and just take the phone with you wherever you ride. It's not a fancy system, but it ...


11

Probably what you want is a "hybrid" or "commuter" bike. Flat handlebars (like a mountain bike), smooth road tires (but a bit fatter than on a racing bike), usually the right stuff for mounting a rack and fenders. Go down to your Local Bike Shop and look at what they have. Make sure it's a store that basically just does bicycles, not a department store that ...


11

It's a little more than 100$, but you could have a Garmin Edge 20 for 130$. Maybe wait a little for a special or something*. According to the post it's a good little computer and I personnaly enjoy using their Edge lineup. (* the website has a 10% anything coupon with their partner, might be worth a look, that would bring the Edge 20 to 117$, might not work ...


10

$50 - $100 isn't going to get you much in parts, especially any that would be an "upgrade" from your current setup. If you're riding your bike often, it's possible that you'll spend an amount approaching that this year on new tubes and/or tires when you get a flat or wear your tires out. My suggestion would be to ride this bike and enjoy it. You'll get your ...


10

On a chainsaw is it called bar lube (not chain lube). It is designed to lube the bar. This is chainsaw chain: Not the same beast as bicycle chain. I don't even think there are rollers. Bar lube is more viscous than bicycle chain lube. Bar lube does not need a long life - it is going to get thrown off. There is an excess of bar lube and big gaps ...


10

Spending $30 / month at your LBS seems perfectly reasonable. Your LBS is grateful you buy from them instead of from Amazon. If you sometimes go to your bike store just to talk, that probably OK, as long as you are not distracting any staff from real work or keeping them from serving customers who are paying. Either they actually like chatting with you or ...


9

I lack experience with entry-level (walmart, etc.) bikes, so take my answer with this in consideration. I was shopping this month for a good commuter bike to replace my old road bike (more about it below). I don't own a car, so I'll use it 15 miles per day, almost every workday between april and october, as well as for carrying all groceries and various ...


9

While I'm not a road biker, I can speak from experience with mountain bike tires. The first spot to wear is the center of the tread. Why? It's the part that is ridden on the most. Increasing the width of your tire with increase the contact patch (the part of the tire touching the ground); therefore, your wear is going to be the same because that contact ...


8

Air will escape, one of the biggest problems with Ghetto tubeless (unfortunate, but long established name for this technique) and not using specific tubeless ready or UST (tubeless standard) tires is that you need to inflate your tires a lot. At worst for every ride. The tires often do roll off the rim. Not every combination of Ghetto tubeless will work (the ...


7

The most frugal is not to intensively clean these parts except at the end of the tour when you overhaul your bike. Simply brushing off the dirt with a cleaning brush, toothbrush, or rag and relubricating with a good dry lube will get you most of the benefits with little of the mess. And it’s a lighter kit. You don’t need a spotless bike.


7

Sad to say, not worth the effort! However, if you are a bulk user of cable outer then you can invest in a big reel of the stuff (obviously genuine Shimano) and some Shimano cable cutters (TL-CT-10). Broken link: http://www.madison.co.uk/productinfo.aspx?catref=6Y1+9801 Possible replacements https://www.google.com/search?q=Shimano+cable+cutters http://www....


7

I don't see much point in "improving" the bike until you decide what improvements you need. About the only thing I can think of that you might want to change right off is the tires, if they're heavily lugged (which I can't tell from the description) and you prefer road to off-road riding. And, of course, you may find that a different seat would suit you ...


7

The things that will make a wheel more durable in this kind of service are: Bigger tires – the bigger the tire the more space you have to cushion an impact, bigger tires also mean that the load is more distributed. Since the bigger tire gives you more support you can also run a somewhat lower pressure which means that there is more flex in the tire before ...


7

1) "am I freeloading, or am I a (financially) valued customer?" Depends. Most bike shops I've been to are happy with giving some of advice -- helping the person find the right part and them do it themselves, since thats how a lot of bike upkeep is done. Of course, doing this too much can annoy people and also choice of timing -- if the shop is just sitting ...


7

Nothing wrong with it other than aesthetics. I have 3 master links on the 2.8 metre chain in my `bent. Its glaringly obvious too cos the masters are shiny chrome and the rest of the chain is a dull cheap galv chain. There might be a few grams difference in weight too, but realistically that's probably less than the weight of dirt on your bike. Just use ...


7

Dedicated 1x systems do have some specific features: 11 or 12 speeds Derailleur able to handle a super ratio cassette (at least 11-40) Narrow-wide chainring Clutch system on the derailleur. You can definitely cobble together parts to make a 1x10 (or 1x9) system. A Vee crank will most likely be fine. 12-32 cassette is reasonable (11-32 would be OK too). A 7 ...


6

There no bike on the market that is very good at folding and also very good at “biking”! So you have to decide if you care most about the folding or how well it works as a bike. For a bike to fold into a small space it must have small wheels. Small wheels are never as good a ride as full sized wheels. The Brompton is consider to be one of the best ...


6

Everyone knows someone with a bike in their shed or garage that is unloved and unused. Just ask around on social media and one will fall in your lap...


6

If you have disc brakes you can use zip ties to create a cheap studded tire and can remove the zip ties when you're done. Get long enough zip ties to go around your tire and rim. Because of this, it will not work with rim based brakes.


6

Using a loud horn to vent your anger is not a good idea. Scared/confused drivers behave even worse than normal drivers, and a loud noise coming from a bike can confuse them. They look around for the car/truck that is blasting them, they won't be looking for a cyclist as they don't expect a horn noise to come from one. They may then waver from their line ...


6

As others have said, just because the bike shop says it's a good fit, doesn't make it so. Their incentive is to sell a bike off the floor so they'll find the one that fits best and sell it to you. I got a custom fit and I have longer thighs than most people. This meant that to get the seat position right, I had to have my saddle further back from the pedals ...


6

Bar lube would perform horrible on a bicycle chain. Why? Well, bar lube must be fully bio-degradable, which chain lube is not required to be. As such, bar lube is basically a vegetable oil, and performs as such. It lubes all-right, but it's also rather sticky, and it oxidizes over time. On a chain-saw, that does not matter because the chain-saw is designed ...


6

Flipping is not feasible as rotors are directional in design. You could rotate between wheels ensuring they are in the correct orientation. But I am not sure what you gain, eventually you will need to replace both at once rather than one at a time. Replacing one at a time could make it easier to spread costs out. While most cable actuated disc brakes move ...


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