26

Are you sure those hex bolts are cracked? They could instead just have peeling chrome. Hex bolts tend to accumulate water and grime and thus corrosion. It could just be surface peeling of the chrome. I'd poke at them with a sharp ice pick and see if it's just surface peeling of chrome or if the bolts are actually cracked. If it's the former you can ...


22

Specific answers to your questions: Does suspension reduce acceleration? Yes, for two reasons. Suspension causes bob, where some of your pedal power goes into flexing the suspension with each pedal stroke. That power does not spring back out and help you, it is lost. This can be helped if your suspension has a lockout function, which is like an off-...


16

Although this isn't explicitly part of your question, I'll go ahead and throw it in as it's one of the most important factors to consider in terms of increased suspension if you plan on pedaling your bike- the basic principle behind propelling a bike is to convert a mostly downward force (pedaling) into forward momentum (the drivetrain turning the back wheel ...


16

Bouncyness* may not be the appropriate term for the behavior you need from your suspension. Suspension has two main functions: Shock Absorbing and Dampening. Shock absorbing is what the fork does by compressing, allowing the wheel to travel upwards. In this process, kinetic energy from the shock is used to compress either a coil spring or an air spring. ...


14

Even if you're regularly riding up and down kerbs you don't need rear suspension. If you did, people wouldn't ride hardtail mountain bikes on the trails, where drop-offs considerably higher than kerbs are normal, as are step-ups. And even with my limited skill that's all possible on a hardtail (nothing massive). Suspension forks add weight, and this will ...


14

The position of shock mounts is only one variable of many of the rear linkage design. It does not play an isolated role but really is tied to everything else. You might have missed that there are many other designs. The upper mount can be on the top tube as well: Or really, in many other places, like in-line with the seatstays: Or pretty much hidden just ...


13

The good news is those bolts aren't load bearing parts directly. The bad news is those are holding the load-bearing parts in place, so a failure of the bolt will allow the pivots to fail very quickly. I'd strongly recommend taking them out and getting replacements from the maker of your frame. Have a look at the answers to this question about shearing ...


12

Because: Long travel bikes have a particular geometry which only benefits descends. Applying long travel on an XC geometry bike will create a bike which is not good for anything. Long travel absorbs a lot of energy. XC riders would not like this. Long travel requires stronger construction to avoid flex. This means more weight.


12

Many first time cross racers use a mountain bike. It makes perfect sense, don't go out and spend $1500+ before you even know whether cyclocross is your cup of tea. Most all races allow mountain bikes, the only type of equipment that's usually forbidden is a fixed gear. A full suspension mountain bike will do just fine as an introductory race vehicle. Your ...


12

You definitely don't need rear suspension: that's for serious off-road riding. For riding on the road and the very mild hardly-off-road-at-all riding you're proposing, rear suspension just adds a lot of weight and it flexes as you pedal, which uses up some of your power. Also, it's a complex system that gives you about five more things to go wrong on the ...


12

Manufacturers design the bike suspension with specific characteristics in mind. For example, should the bike be more poppy or plusher and ground hugging to ride. One parameter in this process is the leverage ratio curve of the rear wheel (Wheel Travel/ Shock travel over the whole travel range). There are many more parameters, but I won't go into details, ...


10

The main issue is the load limits on those racks, and the second one is why those limits exist. The Thule Pack ’n Pedal Tour Rack is claimed to take 25kg, the Topeak seatpost mounted racks will take 9kg. Thule seem to be selling rebadged Freeload gear? I have seen a Thule rack fail with significantly less than 25kg on it, and while being ridden fairly ...


9

You're mixing up two different concepts. The damper, which is what slows things down. The spring, which is what holds the weight and absorbs shocks. The damper is usually hydraulic, oil being forced through a small hole. The spring is either a coil or pressurised air. Without a damper, you'll have a very bouncy ride and without a spring, you'll have a ...


8

Ask yourself this- would you buy a car off of Alibaba to save a few bucks, or would you fork over a little more money and buy a Honda/Toyota/whatever? Buy the name brand bike. If your Alibaba bike's headtube snaps off on a gnarly high speed descent, who's going to do something about it? Not Alibaba, and good luck getting the manufacturer from god knows ...


8

Put simply, a master of a craft will be better at it than a "jack of all trades". A dedicated cross country race bike will be better for XC racing than an All Mountain bike. The same would be true of the dedicated downhill race bike. An All Mountain bike strikes a compromise in the middle, making it a good choice for someone who wants to do a bit of ...


8

This depends on technique, rather than equipment; Trials riders regularly drop several feet on rigid bikes. You should use your legs to absorb the shock of landing to reduce the work done by the suspension, just as you would when jumping down from a height without a bike.


7

disadvantages : more weight (more material, more oil) more energy required in order to pedal the bike is less snappier because it "eats" some of the terrain, so dirt jumping tricks (e.g 360s, backflips, frontflips) are harder than on bikes with less suspension some people believe that more suspension is not appropriate when learning to ride MTB and ...


7

The good folks at Bike Radar have already covered this in pretty good detail in a two part article: Part 1 and Part 2 There's also a chunky thread on the Pinkbike forums that has pictures and descriptions of loads of different setups: Pinkbike - Basic Full Suspension Types / Reference With Pictures In regards to price, it is not the suspension setup making ...


7

First, not all full suspension bikes use bearing for all pivot points, and some bikes don't use them for any. They use bushings instead. That said, assuming you have bearings at all points on your bike: There are 2 types of bearings damage which require replacement in a suspension system. The first, bearing play, means lateral movement inside the bearing ...


6

Suspension isn't something that can broken down simply, but let's try. First, you're asking about two different scenarios: front suspension and full suspension. Both setups can range from as little as 80mm on a hard-tail dirt jumper to 215mm on a full downhill/freeride bike. Now, obviously, you're not going to want to grab your downhill bike to become the ...


6

Regarding how increased suspension adversely effects handling. The first consideration is that to accommodate the increased travel you must make the bike taller so that the pedal/chainrings don't hit the ground as you utilize the increased travel. This results in higher center of gravity and the accompanying adverse handling changes. Second; assuming there ...


6

Bike shops have a special test-bikes to be lent for a whole day or even a weekend. I tested Specialized, Scott and RB for the whole weekend this way. You will pay them a refundable deposit (20-80% of price of the bike - depends on the shop). Some of them will charge you a little for cleaning/service or whatever. This may vary across the countries; I have ...


6

If you haven't done, so try playing with the tire pressures. Many riders assume that you need to inflate them to the maximum psi on the tire. If the pressure is too high the tires tend to bounce off of obstacles instead of rolling over them. If you are light enough, say less than 150 pounds you might be able to run the pressures at 25 or so psi. Set the ...


6

I think first you should read up on the price point people recommend staying with a hard tail. Below that figure (about $US2000 depending who you speak to) Soft tails are heavy with poor rear suspension performance. Almost always, the most economic way to upgrade is to sell the current bike and buy a second hand one. The BD (if its the bike I am thinking ...


6

The Mega is not a single mass-start race. There are qualification stages on the days preceding the main event. You might get an entry into the Mega, but if you don't qualify, that's a very expensive learning experience!


6

Bushings and bearings are nearly identical in terms of the replacement procedure. Personally I think bearings are the better option because bushings typically are manufactured and supported only by the bike manufacturer. This means when the bike becomes discontinued, most of the time, so do the bushings. If you need a bearing replaced, you can typically ...


5

In general, no, there is not a "a best suspension frame" (just as there is no best car, best breed of cat, or best person). There are loads of different suspension designs (single pivot, FSR, DW Link, Maestro, VPP, URT, iDrive, ABP, Switch, Pathlink, Droplink, to name only a few), each with their own distinct advantages and disadvantages. There are also a ...


5

A few quick points about the article The author did not provide all the math and formulations so we need to take it on faith that the correct formulae were used and there are not implementation errors. The author also only considered one bike, the 2015 Giant Reign 27.5". Finally, the results seem reasonable to me. The main take home from the article (which ...


5

Take them out and check if they are hollow, it might be that those are only the burrs from machining the hex.


5

On a full-suspension bike, the rear chain- and seat-stays are attached using pivot points. However, what attaches to the dropouts on the chainstay? The wheels. The chain's route is constantly changing as the suspension travel changes. If the suspension is fully compressed, the distance from the wheel to the pedal decreases. If the suspension is fully de-...


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