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4

At bikex.org, boiling water has been far more reliable than degreaser. We've had many gummed up shifters and the hot water works faster on old really old grease than (citrus) degreaser. Even the chemical degreasers haven't worked as well.


3

If I understood your question, you may want to look into internally geared hubs, it seems they are exactly what you are looking for. I thought they were fairly popular, so I would be surprised if you really have not come across these - so I am sorry if I missed the point. A landmark feature of gear hubs is that you can change gear while stationary - it ...


2

Looks like this frame might designed for derailleur cable setup, probably with down tube shifters. It looks like there is a cable housing stop on the chain stay, and the dropouts do not allow for chain tension adjustment. Even if the frame isn’t set up for derailleur cabling, there are bolt on cable housing stops available. The rear dropout spacing magic be ...


11

Yes. Absolutely. Simply install an internal gear hub. Prices for internal gear hubs are basically what you want to spend: You can buy decent second hand IGHs (SRAM 7 speed, 300% gear spread, super reliable) for as low as 25 Euros, or you can invest roughly a thousand euros into a new top-of-the-list IGH (Rohloff, 14 gears, 500% gear spread, super reliable, ...


1

Sturmey archer make 2, 3, 5 and 8speed hubs with a 120mm spacing for a track bike. The 2 sp requires no cables. Older hubs are available in a 120 spacing to take a freewheel (up to 5sp?) and SunXCD makes a 120mm cassette hub. You would need a bolt on hanger to use either of these. Hope that helps.


9

The bike in the question is not what is considered as "track drop outs". For that bike, depending on the rear wheel spacing, it should be relatively easy to convert back to geared. I would suggest, leaving the front as a 1x system. This is subjective, but I would just get a relatively moderate ring on the frontm between 40t to 46t depending on how ...


1

It's not ideal but is doable. Biggest factor being the rear hub spacing. If it's 120mm horisontal dropouts (the standard for track frames) then the best thing would be to get a 120mm internal geared hub such as the Sturmey Archer S-RF5 5Spd Hub (other available). If, for any reason, it has 130/135mm rear dropouts (as found on jump bike and other single speed ...


2

This exact scenario recently happened to me. I was powering up a grass bank on my cargo bike but it was softer than I thought and I slowed down fast. I quickly grabbed several gears on the rear derailleur to get up it, and I didn't have time to let off the pedals. It went fine, but the next day my bike had a shifting problem in low gears. When I tried to ...


2

So the damage happened at the same time you shifted to a lower gear ? I'm guessing you were pushing hard because its a steep grade, and the chain was not fully engaged in the bigger cog when you pushed hard. Notice the top 6 teeth are not engaged on the biggest sprocket, but are also not meshing with the next-smallest sprocket? Image shows a 28 and 32 ...


4

Adding to Vladimir's answer: The different size chainrings in the crank provide larger jumps in gear ratios, the smaller sprockets on the wheel provide smaller jumps. There is quiet a large overlap between the gear ratios available when on each of the three chainrings. The general idea is that you select the appropriate front chainring for whatever gradients ...


10

You have two shifters. A friction shifter for the front derailer and a 6-speed indexed shifter for the rear derailer. The shifters are operating by turning the grip front and back (like a motorbike throttle). The front shifter is on the left. You must learn how to find the right position yourself, because it is a friction shifter, you can move it ...


4

It's not clear why you would want to use an 11-42 cassette in a 3x drivetrain. 11-42 cassettes are typically used with 1x or 2x systems. With a 22 tooth chainring and 34 tooth sprocket you already have a pretty low gear ratio (0.65) - lower than a typical 1x drivetrain with a 30 tooth chainring and 11-42 cassette (0.71), and only a little higher than a 2x 36 ...


1

There are two things to be aware of here, three if you consider the hack. First, it seems you have already considered max cog size. This will affect whether or not the derailleur can get the chain up onto the biggest cog. Technically, you need to be aware of minimum cog too, but you have an 11 which is arguably the most common for MTB. I assume this is ...


3

Yes, a 10 speed chain is significantly narrower than a 7 speed chain. Even considering that most people now use 8-speed chains even for 7 speeds. The difference can make shifting to stop working.


3

Yes, while the internal width is the same, the external width of 10 speed chains is narrower. Refer https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/chain-compatibility


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