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7

Leave the wheel in tact and see if you can order some 'turbo trainer axle nuts', pictured below, to replace your current nuts on existing axle. If these don't work for you then start disassembling the wheel but research first; you need skinny spanners called cone spanners (£?) to do the job properly and risk dropping ball bearings (annoying). Not normally a ...


1

I have a similar Saris trainer. I tried fitting a solid axle wheel onto it. In my setup the wheel did not securely fit in the clamp. The only thing I think would work is if you could find some domed caps nuts to go the end of the axle. Finding these may be difficult as axle threads are not always a standard thread. Their website did not offer and adapters or ...


2

This is not an easy swap. It would be easier to buy a wheel and freewheel and swap the tire. As Swifty points out in comments - it's a great convenience to have a turbo tire and wheel to swap in when training. I looked up your trainer and read the manual. I had hoped that they could somehow accommodate a solid axle - Nope. It says that you have to use the ...


2

As you have observed your bike has a threaded, solid axle. The wheel is fixed in the frame with a nut on each end of the axle. The Fluid 2 trainer is designed for wheels with a standard quick release mechanism. Quick release hubs have an axle that does not protrude past the frame dropouts and has a concentric hole through which the quick release skewer ...


2

I figured out what the problem was. As per Fred's suggestion I checked every section of the cable housing, which revealed that the housing was fine. The issue was that I was feeding the cable into the front derailleur clamp in the wrong direction (anticlockwise instead of clockwise) - thus the cable fed in lower than it should have, reducing the moment, and ...


5

Did you replace the housing as well? It sounds like the derailleur is working fine and the problem is somewhere in between the shifter and the derailleur in the housing. To fully diagnose the problem, you'll need to start at the shifter and work through each section. First test just the shifter, disconnect the cable and remove the cable from the housing. ...


2

The beauty with friction shift levers is they're compatible with almost every derailleur. The greatest challenge is to get the rear shifting dialed in with the closely spaced rear cassette cogs on 10, 11 and 12 speed setups. But your Hilltopper was probably sold with 7 or 8 speeds in the back which will work perfectly for friction shifters. If one over or ...


6

I hear that there are books and papers that discuss the shape of the teeth and they also have equations used to determine the shape using the pitch and roller diameter dimensions from the chain... if anyone has any information on this or has a website/book/technical report where I can find more info about this topic please let me know. This is a huge topic ...


-1

There are also an array of chain tensioners out there, if you really don't want to cut the chain.


1

I do a lot of single speed and fixed gear cycling, and if the geography in your area is relatively flat, that 40 t ring you have might be perfect with a cog between 15 and 18 t, depending on how strong your riding is or how much potential speed you might want to achieve. If you plan on a long ride or maintaining a particular average speed, your ratio will ...


3

why dont you want to change the chain? you need to get used to fact, that each change of cog is also a change of chain/chain length. just order 18 or 19 tooth cog and new chain and you will end with 52/18=2,9 or 52/19=2,7 much more comfortable ratio for day to day travels just for comparision, 3,5 ratio is extremly hard/heavy ratio. even not all track ...


1

Yes, to the first approximation you need to keep the total number of teeth the same in order to use the same chain on the same base. Think of it this way: to keep the same distance between the crankshaft (bottom bracket) and the rear axle, by definition you need the same number of 'free' (disengaged) links; or more accurately, the same number of links ...


6

Different from the other answer, I read the question as OP wanting to change to lower gear ratio without changing chain length. 52/15 is an extremely high ratio. For all practical purposes, if you want to keep the chain length same, the sum of numbers of teeth in cog and ring should stay the same. The changing geometry does affect the result a bit, but ...


0

52:15 on any size of wheel is the same as 3.47 ratio, meaning 3.47 wheel rotations per rotation of the crank. To achieve the same ratio with a 48 tooth chainring, a 14 tooth cog gives you 3.43 so near-enough the same. If you don't want to remove 1 or 2 full chain links, then the axle will move back around 2 inches, or 1 inch. Given that you require ...


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