5

Don't just look at the stack and BB drop, consider the steering geometry as a whole (chainstay length, BB drop, head angle, front-center [BB axis to front wheel axis]) which will affect how the bike handles; and the cockpit geometry (stack and reach) which will affect your position. Cockpit geometry and steering geometry are interrelated obviously, a bike ...


5

That bike is what it is, a great urban and light trail machine built to a price point. You got what you paid for. Get out and braap. Most worthy upgrades like wheels, drive train, brakes and suspension will cost the same or more than you paid for the whole thing originally. So don’t spend any more than you need to cover breakages/maintenance. The limiting ...


5

Rear Center Length It’s the distance from the rear hub to the bottom bracket. More or less the chainstay length. Unfortunately Reid Cycles doesn’t have a diagram of what and where exactly they are measuring. For example top tube length could be the actual tube length or a “virtual” top tube length (like in the diagram below) if the top tube were completely ...


4

It's hard to tell how much flexing is happening when you're on the bike due to your movement when pedaling, particularly if you're not smooth. The answer is "some" (all frames will flex a bit when you ride), but putting a number or picture to it would depend to some extent on how much weight and force you have on the bike and the frame type and stuff too. ...


4

My son had an toe-overlap issue, and it turned out the forks were on backwards. I looked up how to take the forks out, and after I turned them around, the bike is perfect. No toe-overlap! Thanks for the suggestion.


3

I think the question deserves some additional treatment as to frame sizing. I realize the OP may have downplayed aspects of frame sizing in his question, but that's arguably the wrong approach. It benefits the end user to know how to select a bike size, and the parameters I describe may not have been in common use in 2011, when the question was asked. They ...


2

So are bikes with sloping top tubes lighter than bikes with horizontal top tubes? No. The frame may be lighter but the total bicycle ain't. The larger bending moment at the location where the seatpost enters the frame must be supported, and it means the seatpost requires more material besides needing to be longer. Even if the seatpost is not made more ...


2

The head tube angle is the same, the seat tube angle is the same, so raising or lowering stem and or seat post will be no different regardless if it is a traditional or compact. The difference is the amount of adjustability. A compact frame means a shorter seat tube and head tube and a steerer tube which is relatively long compared to the head tube. This ...


2

The claim is pure marketing and does not make any sense at all, unless you only care about standover height. It is true that Giant has smaller selection of sizes than competing manufacturers, and Giant might use the claim to explain why, but even their own models are not consistent with the explanation: High end Giant models have 6, not 3 frame sizes. This ...


2

It sounds to me like your BB may be loose.


2

First, to answer the question - Bikes with lower bottom brackets are more stable (and less nimble), and bikes with higher bottom brackets are less stable (and more nimble). Lower bottom bracket height can also cause pedal clearance issues, although this can be accommodated with changes to riding style. In the case of a flip-chip, the slightly lower BB ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible