Hot answers tagged

23

It's used to pull the gloves off without them going inside out. Don't pull too hard, or they will rip. A gentle even pull should be enough to remove the gloves.


14

All sorts of reasons: Less damage to your hands when you fall off. Vibration dampening. Somewhere to wipe snot/sweat. In practice, I use them when I am touring (long distances in the saddle - so reason 2 above), and when I am mountain-cycling competitively (reasons 1 and 3), but don't wear them when I am on my daily commute.


13

Thankfully I never ride without gloves. The light weight gloves with padded leather in the palms is all you need - they are cheap, comfortable and effective - what more could you ask for. I had a crash after my bike was tampered with and the front wheel fell off. I am a programmer, and although I emptied the company first aid kit of dressings, and could not ...


12

Additional points to Penguino's answer Warmth - Even on a summer's day some light gloves help keep your fingers limber. Its scary to reach for the brakes on a downhill and find your fingers aren't reacting very fast. I have long arms, so my shirt sleeves never reach the gloves, so I wear some wrist wraps to seal the gap too. Visibility - when you're ...


9

There is plenty of advice about gloves under the Gloves tag. See especially the question "What's the purpose of cycling gloves?" and one of the answers. From which you see that I recommend ordinary cycling gloves. Your purpose is their purpose. But I suggest that while you should be wearing gloves, you also should pay attention to how you ride, and where ...


8

Park Tool recommends their own product: I used to hate gloves for anything (car, bike, whatever) until I got used to wearing them while in Iraq and Afghanistan. Originally I used the Mechanix Wear gloves and I still like them for working on my car:


6

You'll need gloves that allow you to still hold the bars and use the brakes and shifters. Standard mittens don't work well since you have to grab the brake with all your fingers. Durable waterproof ski gloves with five fingers are one of the best options, especially those which come with a hand warmer pocket for extra warmth capability. Some folks prefer ...


5

Atlas-Fit nylon gloves are surprisingly good when you want to work in oil, rain or cold. They stretch over your fingers and are easily tough enough to put snow cables on car tires in the winter. I know a bicycle mechanic that prefers to use these when they are doing oily work — like flooding bearings or breaking frozen parts they are soaking in oil: the ...


5

In all honesty, I think your best bet is Bar Mitts or something similar. They're neoprene covers that attach to your handlebars and cover your hands. They allow you to get away with wearing thinner gloves so you stay a little more dexterous. If you ride drop bars, you're kinda stuck riding on the hoods to stay protected. You can still move your hands to the ...


4

I've got some wetsuit glue, and the join is really tough. Just be sure to use it on clean, dry material,follow the instructions carefully (it's a bit like patch cement), and allow it to set for plenty of time before use. Sadly, you can probably reckon on a nearby failure before too long, as the stress is moved to a different place. I recommend keeping the ...


4

Maybe try Downhill Mountain Biking gloves. Downhill doesn't suffer the same weight considerations as road cycling, so the gear is generally much tougher and designed to offer protection in some pretty terrifying crashes. The best pair I had were designed with gel-pads at the heel of the hand, which cushioned any impacts...of which I had a few. Snowboarding ...


3

Like these, but long fingered? Hang on, found one: like this. I assume the cut-out used to be needed to avoid bunching due to the wrist fastening, and that was needed before they could just make the whole thing out of stretchy mesh. Anyway, in both cases they're just described as gloves.


3

Driving gloves? Fancy Ferrari version I don't think I've seen cycling specific gloves in that configuration. However, if you want full finger cycling gloves, there are Mountain bike gloves used for racing that ventilate pretty well due to the lightweight fabrics used. They don't have an open back, but otherwise work well.


2

A lot of motocross/motorcycle gloves have support built into the fingers to prevent excess motion in the wrong direction (like these). There are a few DH mountain biking gloves that have "armor" on the fingers that restrict movement a bit. Unfortunately, with braking and tricks and steering, it's important to have a good range of motion in the hand, fingers, ...


2

It sounds like you have a kind of injury that is common in skiing. What happens is the ski pole handle gets trapped under the thumb when falling, causing the thumb to bend the wrong way. You can find supports such as this one. I can't speak for that one specifically, but if you look up "skier's thumb" on the internet you should be able to find lots of ...


2

Usually when you fall on asphalt, fingerless gloves do cover the area of impact. Lots of manufacturers do make cycling gloves which are full fingered, such as the Giro Bravo shown below: You may feel more comfortable with this, but your hands will get a bit warmer and having open fingers helps making some adjustments a bit nicer. Depending on how ...


2

My favoured winter option for gloves is neoprene. When they inevitably start to tear - my preference is to stitch neoprene. The best stitch I've found is to use is a wide stitch to pull the edges of the material together rather than small tight stitches. The stitching doesn't look pretty but makes for a more durable repair. I used a standard needle with ...


1

When testing for something, you wanna make sure you are providing the similar environment for testing as for use. Exhale some warm moist air on handle-like things, make sure you warm your hands up to the maximum extent by rubbing vigorously, hold them firmly for next 5 or so mins (doesn't matter riding or not). This'll let you judge 3 things basically: ...


1

I have used the gloves from wetseal for the past three winters riding every day to and from both school and work. They are good down to about 20F then I switch to my snowboarding mittens which are harder to shift and brake with but they are crazy warm. I was thinking about getting a pair of those split mittens the vulcan style mitten as mentioned above. That ...


1

Trying not to mention what has already been said but: Gloves that wick well will also help to keep you cooler (and cut offs are not a significant disadvantage in this sense, due to surface area to volume ratios and blood flow.) The main reasons for choosing cut off gloves as opposed to more protective full finger gloves (given that both can keep you more ...


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