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14

I wouldn’t recommend using a fitness watch on the bike. At least for me it got uncomfortable pretty quickly because your wrist is bent while on the bike. In addition all the hard vibrations make the watch shake against your wrist. Because your wrists are bent the built-in heart rate monitor of many watches won’t work properly. To read data from a watch’s ...


9

The question overlooks some important points or gets them wrong. The cheapest Garmin, the 130, does have navigation. Some exercise-oriented smart watches will operate for weeks, but a chest band will run for a year or so on a coin cell. Using GPS on a smart watch burns through the battery much more quickly, so that there's little or no battery-life ...


7

Problem with Optical HR is it is unreliable, not inaccurate. For HR accuracy within a few percent won't make a lot of difference to most people, but if your watch locks to the wrong thing, you get silly HR readings you know are wrong. This screws your training session and season averages. Optical sensors often have trouble tracking quick changes to HR, so ...


4

One point - the watch is on your wrist, compared to a computer on your handlebars and a phone is in your pocket.. Only one of those can be seen without letting go of the handlebars, briefly for the watch and quite awkwardly for a phone. Therefore the watch is less safe than the computer.


2

I have been useing a sports watch on a bike for many years. It is absolutely fine if recording your ride is what you are mainly after - and that is certainly my case. And regularly checking the time, distance and maybe the current speed from time to time. I use it for all my other outdoor sports, cross country skiing, hiking, running. One cannot check the ...


2

Per our FAQ, we technically don't allow most opinion-based questions. I'll instead focus on things to consider if you're choosing between a basic head unit/GPS bike computer (many of which aren't made by Garmin!) and a smart watch. Some smart watches are all-rounders (the Apple Watches are one obvious example) and some are more sport-focused. We are all ...


1

The watch is only good on a bicycle when you wear short sleeves. Otherwise it is usually gets obstructed by the clothes on your hand. If not outright below the glove, then the jacket is covering it enough. Mobile phone has another problem - the display may not be viewable in direct sunlight. As a result, probably the dedicated bicycle computer is the best ...


1

The answer is a bit different is you speak about generalities, or if you want to purchase new devices and weight in the different options. The first one has already been addressed in the other answers, so my answer will be focused on the second one. If you consider purchasing new devices, it is important to consider the additional specs required by cycling, ...


1

Here's my feedback on this. What I indicate as "Komoot" is the itinerary as planned with Komoot, what I indicate by "Wahoo" is the recording by my cycle computer (Wahoo Elmnt Bolt 2nd generation — color screen, with barometric altimeter), Apple is an Apple Watch Series 6 + iPhone SE 1st gen (I don't know what device is used for ...


1

A new alternative is the Apple AirTag or the Samsung SmartTag (possibly similar systems from other companies exist or will come soon). These are small tags with Low Energy Bluetooth technology that the smartphone can locate. As they are small (ca. 4x4x1cm) and the battery (CR2032, ubiquitous battery in various items like fitness trackes or kitchen scales) is ...


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